ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Epigenetics, Exosomes, and MicroRNAs in Metabolic Disorders"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Marcelina Prrizas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratori de Diabetis i Obesitat, CIBERDEM, Barcelona-08036, Spain
Interests: metabolic disorders (particularly type 2 diabetes and obesity); epigenetics; exosomes; microRNAs and tissue crosstalk in the regulation of metabolism
Dr. Carlos Castaño
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Laboratori de Diabetis i Obesitat, CIBERDEM, Barcelona-08036, Spain
Interests: exosomes; metabolism; diabetes; obesity; animal physiology and surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Maintenance of metabolic homeostasis requires the coordinated action of many cell types. This organismal-level communication is mediated by a variety of secreted factors that regulate cellular function to optimize nutrient fluxes. However, environmental influences may induce aberrant epigenetic modifications and disturb tissue crosstalk, leading to decompensations in fuel use that ultimately result in insulin resistance, obesity, and overt disease. Exosomes and other small vesicles released by, amongst other things, the adipose tissue, regulate gene expression in other tissues through microRNA (miRNA) transfer, hence modulating inter-organ crosstalk.

This Special Issue aims to highlight the latest research on the role of epigenetic modifications and exosome-mediated tissue crosstalk in the development of metabolic disorders. The topics that we intend to cover include the following:

- epigenetics and metabolism;

- exosomes and exosomal miRNAs in the regulation of metabolism;

- exosomes and exosomal miRNAs as biomarkers for metabolic disorders; and

- use of exosomes and extracellular vesicles as therapeutic agents and vectors for the treatment of metabolic disorders.

Dr. Marcelina Prrizas
Guest Editor
Dr. Carlos Castaño
Co-Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • extracellular vesicles
  • microRNAs
  • epigenetic modifications
  • tissue crosstalk
  • diabetes
  • obesity
  • non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • biomarkers
  • therapy

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Postnatal Smoke Exposure Further Increases the Hepatic Nicotine Metabolism in Prenatally Smoke Exposed Male Offspring and Is Linked with Aberrant Cyp2a5 Methylation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(1), 164; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22010164 - 26 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 947
Abstract
Prenatal smoke exposure (PreSE) is a risk factor for nicotine dependence, which is further enhanced by postnatal smoke exposure (PostSE). One susceptibility gene to nicotine dependence is Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2A6, an enzyme responsible for the conversion of nicotine to cotinine in the [...] Read more.
Prenatal smoke exposure (PreSE) is a risk factor for nicotine dependence, which is further enhanced by postnatal smoke exposure (PostSE). One susceptibility gene to nicotine dependence is Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2A6, an enzyme responsible for the conversion of nicotine to cotinine in the liver. Higher CYP2A6 activity is associated with nicotine dependence and could be regulated through DNA methylation. In this study we investigated whether PostSE further impaired PreSE-induced effects on nicotine metabolism, along with Cyp2a5, orthologue of CYP2A6, mRNA expression and DNA methylation. Using a mouse model where prenatally smoke-exposed adult offspring were exposed to cigarette smoke for 3 months, enzyme activity, mRNA levels, and promoter methylation of hepatic Cyp2a5 were evaluated. We found that in male offspring, PostSE increased PreSE-induced cotinine levels and Cyp2a5 mRNA expression. In addition, both PostSE and PreSE changed Cyp2a5 DNA methylation in male groups. PreSE however decreased cotinine levels whereas it had no effect on Cyp2a5 mRNA expression or methylation. These adverse outcomes of PreSE and PostSE were most prominent in males. When considered in the context of the human health aspects, the combined effect of prenatal and adolescent smoke exposure could lead to an accelerated risk for nicotine dependence later in life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetics, Exosomes, and MicroRNAs in Metabolic Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Recent Highlights of Research on miRNAs as Early Potential Biomarkers for Cardiovascular Complications of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(6), 3153; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22063153 - 19 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 746
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its complications pose a serious threat to the life and health of patients around the world. The most dangerous complications of this disease are vascular complications. Microvascular complications of T2DM include retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. In turn, [...] Read more.
Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its complications pose a serious threat to the life and health of patients around the world. The most dangerous complications of this disease are vascular complications. Microvascular complications of T2DM include retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. In turn, macrovascular complications include coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and cerebrovascular disease. The currently used diagnostic methods do not ensure detection of the disease at an early stage, and they also do not predict the risk of developing specific complications. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, endogenous, noncoding molecules that are involved in key processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Recent research has assigned them an important role as potential biomarkers for detecting complications related to diabetes. We suggest that utilizing miRNAs can be a routine approach for early diagnosis and prognosis of diseases and may enable the development of better therapeutic approaches. In this paper, we conduct a review of the latest reports demonstrating the usefulness of miRNAs as biomarkers in the vascular complications of T2DM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetics, Exosomes, and MicroRNAs in Metabolic Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop