ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Interaction between Gut Microbiome and Mucosal Immunity in the Gastrointestinal Disorders"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Hirokazu Fukui
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Japan
Interests: inflammation; microbiome; carcinogenesis; molecular pathology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Toshihiko Tomita
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Japan

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This section aims enable rapid publication of contributions on all aspects of molecular pathology. Not only experimental studies but also translational research and clinical trials are acceptable. Clinical trials/data only are not acceptable.

The gut microbiome plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of various gastrointestinal disorders. Indeed, dysbiosis is significantly involved in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease, functional gastrointestinal disorders, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and gastrointestinal cancers. However, it remains unclear how the gut microbiome plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of those diseases. To clarify this issue, the interaction between gut microbiome and mucosal immunity is certainly a key phenomenon, and the disruption of mucosal barrier function is integrally involved in such an interaction as a cause and/or a result. On the other hand, various factors including antibiotics, psychological stress or diet are known to alter not only the gut microbiome profile but also mucosal barrier function, inducing mucosal immune system activation and gastrointestinal minimal inflammation. In these contexts, this Special Issue aims to collect original research and review articles concerning new insights into the interaction between gut microbiome and gastrointestinal immune system in the gastrointestinal disorders, focusing its associated factors (antibiotics, psychological stress or diet, etc.) and resultant gastrointestinal minimal inflammation.

Dr. Hirokazu Fukui
Dr. Toshihiko Tomita
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • inflammation
  • carcinogenesis
  • functional gastrointestinal disorders
  • gut hormone
  • microbiome
  • intestinal mucosal immunity
  • mucosal barrier
  • metabolic disorder
  • molecular pathology
  • genetic and epigenetic mechanism

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Review
The Potential Role of REG Family Proteins in Inflammatory and Inflammation-Associated Diseases of the Gastrointestinal Tract
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(13), 7196; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22137196 - 03 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1040
Abstract
Regenerating gene (REG) family proteins serve as multifunctional secretory molecules with trophic, antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and probably immuno-regulatory effects. Since their discovery, accumulating evidence has clarified the potential roles of the REG family in the occurrence, progression and development of a wide range [...] Read more.
Regenerating gene (REG) family proteins serve as multifunctional secretory molecules with trophic, antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and probably immuno-regulatory effects. Since their discovery, accumulating evidence has clarified the potential roles of the REG family in the occurrence, progression and development of a wide range of inflammatory and inflammation-associated diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, significant gaps still exist due to the undefined nature of certain receptors, regulatory signaling pathways and possible interactions among distinct Reg members. In this narrative review, we first describe the structural features, distribution pattern and purported regulatory mechanisms of REG family proteins. Furthermore, we summarize the established and proposed roles of REG proteins in the pathogenesis of various inflammation-associated pathologies of the GI tract and the body as a whole, focusing particularly on carcinogenesis in the ulcerative colitis—colitic cancer sequence and gastric cancer. Finally, the clinical relevance of REG products in the context of diagnosis, treatment and prognostication are also discussed in detail. The current evidence suggests a need to better understanding the versatile roles of Reg family proteins in the pathogenesis of inflammatory-associated diseases, and their broadened future usage as therapeutic targets and prognostic biomarkers is anticipated. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop