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Special Issue "The Role of Magnesium and Other Bio-Elements in Pathoetiology of Human and Animal Ailments"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Martin Kolisek
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Comenius University in Bratislava, Martin, Slovakia
Interests: molecular aspects of Mg2+ transports and cellular Mg homeostasis; SLC transporters; molecular genetics and physiology of neurodegeneration; rare mitochondrial diseases; phosphoproteome
Prof. Dr. Rhian Touyz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Glasgow
Interests: molecular physiology of cardiovascular system; physiology of endothelial cells; Mg in cardiovascular diseases; hypertension; translational and personalized medicine; oxidative stress
Dr. Gerhard Sponder
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Freie Universität Berlin
Interests: molecular biology and genetics of Mg2+ transporters; cellular and subcellular biology; stem cells
Prof. Dr. Andrea Fleig
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
University of Hawai’i
Interests: molecular signaling; electrophysiology; TRPM channels/chanzymes; cellular Mg2+ and Ca2+ homeostasis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Magnesium (Mg) and other biometals (BM) play an essential role in various physiological processes in cells but also at the level of tissue, organ, and of the whole body. Aberrant homeostasis of Mg or other BM can be the consequence of some disease conditions, but it might also be a factor priming the onset of certain diseases. Among serious disease conditions associated with disturbed Mg and other BM homeostasis are cardiovascular, metabolic and also neurological, neurodegenerative, neuromuscular, and psychiatric diseases. In this Special Issue of IJMS, we welcome any original research, review or minireview/hypothesis regarding the role of Mg and of other BM (or their homeostatic factors) in the pathoetiology of human and animal ailments and their use in diagnostics and patient therapy following principles of translational and/or personalized medicine.

Assoc. Prof.Martin Kolisek
Dr. Rhian Touyz
Dr. Gerhard Sponder
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Dietary Mg2+ Intake and the Na+/Mg2+ Exchanger SLC41A1 Influence Components of Mitochondrial Energetics in Murine Cardiomyocytes
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(21), 8221; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21218221 - 03 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 536
Abstract
Cardiomyocytes are among the most energy-intensive cell types. Interplay between the components of cellular magnesium (Mg) homeostasis and energy metabolism in cardiomyocytes is poorly understood. We have investigated the effects of dietary Mg content and presence/functionality of the Na+/Mg2+ exchanger [...] Read more.
Cardiomyocytes are among the most energy-intensive cell types. Interplay between the components of cellular magnesium (Mg) homeostasis and energy metabolism in cardiomyocytes is poorly understood. We have investigated the effects of dietary Mg content and presence/functionality of the Na+/Mg2+ exchanger SLC41A1 on enzymatic functions of selected constituents of the Krebs cycle and complexes of the electron transport chain (ETC). The activities of aconitate hydratase (ACON), isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH), and ETC complexes CI–CV have been determined in vitro in mitochondria isolated from hearts of wild-type (WT) and Slc41a1−/− mice fed a diet with either normal or low Mg content. Our data demonstrate that both, the type of Mg diet and the Slc41a1 genotype largely impact on the activities of enzymes of the Krebs cycle and ETC. Moreover, a compensatory effect of Slc41a1−/− genotype on the effect of low Mg diet on activities of the tested Krebs cycle enzymes has been identified. A machine-learning analysis identified activities of ICDH, CI, CIV, and CV as common predictors of the type of Mg diet and of CII as suitable predictor of Slc41a1 genotype. Thus, our data delineate the effect of dietary Mg content and of SLC41A1 functionality on the energy-production in cardiac mitochondria. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Quantification of Iron Release from Native Ferritin and Magnetoferritin Induced by Vitamins B2 and C
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(17), 6332; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21176332 - 31 Aug 2020
Viewed by 670
Abstract
Various pathological processes in humans are associated with biogenic iron accumulation and the mineralization of iron oxide nanoparticles, especially magnetite. Ferritin has been proposed as a precursor to pathological magnetite mineralization. This study quantifies spectroscopically the release of ferrous ions from native ferritin [...] Read more.
Various pathological processes in humans are associated with biogenic iron accumulation and the mineralization of iron oxide nanoparticles, especially magnetite. Ferritin has been proposed as a precursor to pathological magnetite mineralization. This study quantifies spectroscopically the release of ferrous ions from native ferritin and magnetoferritin as a model system for pathological ferritin in the presence of potent natural reducing agents (vitamins C and B2) over time. Ferrous cations are required for the transformation of ferrihydrite (physiological) into a magnetite (pathological) mineral core and are considered toxic at elevated levels. The study shows a significant difference in the reduction and iron release from native ferritin compared to magnetoferritin for both vitamins. The amount of reduced iron formed from a magnetoferritin mineral core is two to five times higher than from native ferritin. Surprisingly, increasing the concentration of the reducing agent affects only iron release from native ferritin. Magnetoferritin cores with different loading factors seem to be insensitive to different concentrations of vitamins. An alternative hypothesis of human tissue magnetite mineralization and the process of iron-induced pathology is proposed. The results could contribute to evidence of the molecular mechanisms of various iron-related pathologies, including neurodegeneration. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Review of the Action of Magnesium on Several Processes Involved in the Modulation of Hematopoiesis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(19), 7084; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21197084 - 25 Sep 2020
Viewed by 556
Abstract
Magnesium (Mg2+) is an essential mineral for the functioning and maintenance of the body. Disturbances in Mg2+ intracellular homeostasis result in cell-membrane modification, an increase in oxidative stress, alteration in the proliferation mechanism, differentiation, and apoptosis. Mg2+ deficiency often [...] Read more.
Magnesium (Mg2+) is an essential mineral for the functioning and maintenance of the body. Disturbances in Mg2+ intracellular homeostasis result in cell-membrane modification, an increase in oxidative stress, alteration in the proliferation mechanism, differentiation, and apoptosis. Mg2+ deficiency often results in inflammation, with activation of inflammatory pathways and increased production of proinflammatory cytokines by immune cells. Immune cells and others that make up the blood system are from hematopoietic tissue in the bone marrow. The hematopoietic tissue is a tissue with high indices of renovation, and Mg2+ has a pivotal role in the cell replication process, as well as DNA and RNA synthesis. However, the impact of the intra- and extracellular disturbance of Mg2+ homeostasis on the hematopoietic tissue is little explored. This review deals specifically with the physiological requirements of Mg2+ on hematopoiesis, showing various studies related to the physiological requirements and the effects of deficiency or excess of this mineral on the hematopoiesis regulation, as well as on the specific process of erythropoiesis, granulopoiesis, lymphopoiesis, and thrombopoiesis. The literature selected includes studies in vitro, in animal models, and in humans, giving details about the impact that alterations of Mg2+ homeostasis can have on hematopoietic cells and hematopoietic tissue. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Current Methods of Magnetic Resonance for Noninvasive Assessment of Molecular Aspects of Pathoetiology in Multiple Sclerosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(17), 6117; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21176117 - 25 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 636
Abstract
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease with expanding axonal and neuronal degeneration in the central nervous system leading to motoric dysfunctions, psychical disability, and cognitive impairment during MS progression. The exact cascade of pathological processes (inflammation, demyelination, excitotoxicity, diffuse neuro-axonal degeneration, oxidative [...] Read more.
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease with expanding axonal and neuronal degeneration in the central nervous system leading to motoric dysfunctions, psychical disability, and cognitive impairment during MS progression. The exact cascade of pathological processes (inflammation, demyelination, excitotoxicity, diffuse neuro-axonal degeneration, oxidative and metabolic stress, etc.) causing MS onset is still not fully understood, although several accompanying biomarkers are particularly suitable for the detection of early subclinical changes. Magnetic resonance (MR) methods are generally considered to be the most sensitive diagnostic tools. Their advantages include their noninvasive nature and their ability to image tissue in vivo. In particular, MR spectroscopy (proton 1H and phosphorus 31P MRS) is a powerful analytical tool for the detection and analysis of biomedically relevant metabolites, amino acids, and bioelements, and thus for providing information about neuro-axonal degradation, demyelination, reactive gliosis, mitochondrial and neurotransmitter failure, cellular energetic and membrane alternation, and the imbalance of magnesium homeostasis in specific tissues. Furthermore, the MR relaxometry-based detection of accumulated biogenic iron in the brain tissue is useful in disease evaluation. The early description and understanding of the developing pathological process might be critical for establishing clinically effective MS-modifying therapies. Full article
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