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Special Issue "Matricellular Proteins: Modifiers of Cell Behavior in Development, Disease & Tissue Remodeling"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Douglas Hamilton
Website
Guest Editor
Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St, London, ON N6A 5C1, Canada
Interests: non-healing skin wounds; the adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation of immune cells
Prof. Dr. Kim S. Midwood
Website
Guest Editor
The university of Oxford
Prof. Dr. Kurt D. Hankenson
Website
Guest Editor
University of Michigan Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ann Arbor, United States
Dr. Olga Stenina Adognravi

Guest Editor
Lerner Research Institute, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Matricellular proteins were first described by the Bornstein group in 1995. Since then, they have become a major focus of research in the area of extracellular matrix and cell biology. As a class of matrix proteins, matricellular proteins are characterized by their ability to modify the cell phenotype in health and disease and have been implicated in numerous cancer types, acute healing, and fibrosis. Matricellular proteins are important during development, but are typically restricted to tissue remodeling, wound repair, and remodeling in the normal adult. Matricellular proteins interact with cell surface receptors, such as integrins, and are able to bind growth factors as well as the structural components of the matrix, such as collagen. Galectins, tenascins, thrombospondins, SPARC, osteopontin, hevin, periostin, and bone sialoprotein are all classed as matricellular proteins, each with varying functions. Gene-deletion technology has shown that matricellular proteins have very specific functions, and few compensatory effects are evident. Indeed, the deletion of most matricellular proteins only becomes apparent after wounding of tissues in mice. Therefore, it appears that matricellular proteins are essential to the tissue response to pathological insults.

Assoc. Prof. Douglas Hamilton
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers

This special issue is now open for submission.
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