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Special Issue "Diet and Metabolism: Molecular Mechanisms of Health and Disease"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sabrina Battista
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto per l’Endocrinologia e l’Oncologia Sperimentale “G. Salvatore” (IEOS), CNR, Naples, Italy
Interests: stem cells; cancer stem cells; carcinogenesis; glioblastoma; high mobility group proteins; asymmetric division; diet; adipose tissue; obesity; differentiation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Francesca Puca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
MD Anderson Cancer Center, Dept. Genomic Medicine, Houston, TX
Interests: metabolism; cancer biology; brain cancer; cancer metabolism; lipid metabolism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrients are, by definition, the building blocks for energy generation and tissue homeostasis. The plethora of coordinated pathways that define their molecular fate altogether constitute our metabolism. In the last decades, metabolic alterations, caused by poor eating habits or congenital mutations, have emerged to dramatically affect human health and to foster the onset of diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer.

This Special issue calls for original articles, reviews, and perspectives addressing, but not limited to, the following:

  • the beneficial and detrimental impact of diet on human health
  • nutrients’ effect on stem cells, including cancer stem cells
  • the importance of diet in cancer prevention and response to therapies
  • the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor cellular metabolism
  • the molecular effects of caloric restriction and obesity
  • the role of diet and metabolism in immunity and autoimmune diseases
  • the action of dietary bioactive compounds
  • the crosstalk between the metabolism and microbiome
  • metabolism and cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, and diabetes

Dr. Sabrina Battista
Dr. Francesca Puca
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • diet
  • metabolism
  • nutrients
  • stem cell
  • cancer stem cell
  • cancer metabolism
  • bioactive compounds
  • glucose
  • lipids
  • obesity
  • caloric restriction
  • high fat diet
  • cardiovascular disease
  • diabetes
  • oxygen
  • hypoxia
  • immune system
  • microbiota
  • autoimmune disease
  • insulin resistance
  • nutraceutics
  • cancer prevention
  • tumor cell metabolism
  • biosynthesis
  • energy
  • glycolysis
  • carbohydrates
  • amino acids
  • homeostasis
  • sirtuins
  • mTOR
  • exercise

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Restriction of Manganese Intake Prevents the Onset of Brain Manganese Overload in Zip14−/− Mice
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(13), 6773; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22136773 - 24 Jun 2021
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Abstract
As a newly identified manganese transport protein, ZIP14 is highly expressed in the small intestine and liver, which are the two principal organs involved in regulating systemic manganese homeostasis. Loss of ZIP14 function leads to manganese overload in both humans and mice. Excess [...] Read more.
As a newly identified manganese transport protein, ZIP14 is highly expressed in the small intestine and liver, which are the two principal organs involved in regulating systemic manganese homeostasis. Loss of ZIP14 function leads to manganese overload in both humans and mice. Excess manganese in the body primarily affects the central nervous system, resulting in irreversible neurological disorders. Therefore, to prevent the onset of brain manganese accumulation becomes critical. In this study, we used Zip14−/− mice as a model for ZIP14 deficiency and discovered that these mice were born without manganese loading in the brain, but started to hyper-accumulate manganese within 3 weeks after birth. We demonstrated that decreasing manganese intake in Zip14−/− mice was effective in preventing manganese overload that typically occurs in these animals. Our results provide important insight into future studies that are targeted to reduce the onset of manganese accumulation associated with ZIP14 dysfunction in humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Metabolism: Molecular Mechanisms of Health and Disease)
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Review

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Review
Epithelial Cell Transformation and Senescence as Indicators of Genome Aging: Current Advances and Unanswered Questions
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(14), 7544; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22147544 - 14 Jul 2021
Viewed by 434
Abstract
The recent advances in deciphering the human genome allow us to understand and evaluate the mechanisms of human genome age-associated transformations, which are largely unclear. Genome sequencing techniques assure comprehensive mapping of human genetics; however, understanding of gene functional interactions, specifically of time/age-dependent [...] Read more.
The recent advances in deciphering the human genome allow us to understand and evaluate the mechanisms of human genome age-associated transformations, which are largely unclear. Genome sequencing techniques assure comprehensive mapping of human genetics; however, understanding of gene functional interactions, specifically of time/age-dependent modifications, remain challenging. The age of the genome is defined by the sum of individual (inherited) and acquired genomic traits, based on internal and external factors that impact ontogenesis from the moment of egg fertilization and embryonic development. The biological part of genomic age opens a new perspective for intervention. The discovery of single cell-based mechanisms for genetic change indicates the possibility of influencing aging and associated disease burden, as well as metabolism. Cell populations with transformed genetic background were shown to serve as the origin of common diseases during extended life expectancy (superaging). Consequently, age-related cell transformation leads to cancer and cell degeneration (senescence). This article aims to describe current advances in the genomic mechanisms of senescence and its role in the spatiotemporal spread of epithelial clones and cell evolution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Metabolism: Molecular Mechanisms of Health and Disease)
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Review
Impact of One-Carbon Metabolism-Driving Epitranscriptome as a Therapeutic Target for Gastrointestinal Cancer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(14), 7278; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22147278 - 06 Jul 2021
Viewed by 663
Abstract
One-carbon (1C) metabolism plays a key role in biological functions linked to the folate cycle. These include nucleotide synthesis; the methylation of DNA, RNA, and proteins in the methionine cycle; and transsulfuration to maintain the redox condition of cancer stem cells in the [...] Read more.
One-carbon (1C) metabolism plays a key role in biological functions linked to the folate cycle. These include nucleotide synthesis; the methylation of DNA, RNA, and proteins in the methionine cycle; and transsulfuration to maintain the redox condition of cancer stem cells in the tumor microenvironment. Recent studies have indicated that small therapeutic compounds affect the mitochondrial folate cycle, epitranscriptome (RNA methylation), and reactive oxygen species reactions in cancer cells. The epitranscriptome controls cellular biochemical reactions, but is also a platform for cell-to-cell interaction and cell transformation. We present an update of recent advances in the study of 1C metabolism related to cancer and demonstrate the areas where further research is needed. We also discuss approaches to therapeutic drug discovery using animal models and propose further steps toward developing precision cancer medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Metabolism: Molecular Mechanisms of Health and Disease)
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