ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Metal Homeostasis and Resistance in Microbes"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Cheol-Won Yun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 02841, Korea
Interests: metal biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Virtually all living organisms require essential trace metal elements, which are required to carry out diverse physiological functions in numerous living organisms including microorganisms. However, the acquisition and utilization of trace metals is strictly regulated because of their toxicity. Microorganisms live in diverse environments ranging from mild to harsh conditions, and their fast adaptation to harsh conditions is an advantage of microorganisms. Hence, microorganisms have developed various mechanisms to maintain cellular metal homeostasis under various conditions and to survive against to metal stresses. The regulatory mechanisms of metal homeostasis, as well as simultaneous stress responses and resistance mechanisms against metal toxicity, have been studied extensively in various microbial model systems. Furthermore, the interaction between different metals in microorganisms also has an important function in maintaining metal homeostasis. However, the detailed mechanisms of cellular metal homeostasis and resistance against metal toxicity at the molecular level remained unsolved. This Special Issue is aimed at identifying the exact mechanisms of metal homeostasis and mechanisms of resistance against metal toxicity in microorganisms at the molecular level.

Prof. Dr. Cheol-Won Yun
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • iron
  • copper
  • zinc
  • manganese
  • nickel
  • pathogens
  • microorganism
  • homeostasis
  • resistance
  • toxicity

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Cadmium Stress Reprograms ROS/RNS Homeostasis in Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(21), 8375; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21218375 - 08 Nov 2020
Viewed by 623
Abstract
Heavy metal pollution causes many soils to become a toxic environment not only for plants, but also microorganisms; however, little is known how heavy metal contaminated environment affects metabolism of phytopathogens and their capability of infecting host plants. In this study the oomycete [...] Read more.
Heavy metal pollution causes many soils to become a toxic environment not only for plants, but also microorganisms; however, little is known how heavy metal contaminated environment affects metabolism of phytopathogens and their capability of infecting host plants. In this study the oomycete Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, the most harmful pathogen of potato, growing under moderate cadmium stress (Cd, 5 mg/L) showed nitro-oxidative imbalance associated with an enhanced antioxidant response. Cadmium notably elevated the level of nitric oxide, superoxide and peroxynitrite that stimulated nitrative modifications within the RNA and DNA pools in the phytopathogen structures. In contrast, the protein pool undergoing nitration was diminished confirming that protein tyrosine nitration is a flexible element of the oomycete adaptive strategy to heavy metal stress. Finally, to verify whether Cd is able to modify P. infestans pathogenicity, a disease index and molecular assessment of disease progress were analysed indicating that Cd stress enhanced aggressiveness of vr P. infestans towards various potato cultivars. Taken together, Cd not only affected hyphal growth rate and caused biochemical changes in P. infestans structures, but accelerated the pathogenicity as well. The nitro-oxidative homeostasis imbalance underlies the phytopathogen adaptive strategy and survival in the heavy metal contaminated environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Homeostasis and Resistance in Microbes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Role of Zinc in Copper Homeostasis of Aspergillus fumigatus
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(20), 7665; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21207665 - 16 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 476
Abstract
Copper is an essential metal ion that performs many physiological functions in living organisms. Deletion of Afmac1, which is a copper-responsive transcriptional activator in A. fumigatus, results in a growth defect on aspergillus minimal medium (AMM). Interestingly, we found that zinc starvation [...] Read more.
Copper is an essential metal ion that performs many physiological functions in living organisms. Deletion of Afmac1, which is a copper-responsive transcriptional activator in A. fumigatus, results in a growth defect on aspergillus minimal medium (AMM). Interestingly, we found that zinc starvation suppressed the growth defect of the Δafmac1 strain on AMM. In addition, the growth defect of the Δafmac1 strain was recovered by copper supplementation or introduction of the CtrC gene into the Δafmac1 strain. However, chelation of copper by addition of BCS to AMM failed to recover the growth defect of the Δafmac1 strain. Through Northern blot analysis, we found that zinc starvation upregulated CtrC and CtrA2, which encode membrane copper transporters. Interestingly, we found that the conserved ZafA binding motif 5′-CAA(G)GGT-3′ was present in the upstream region of CtrC and CtrA2 and that mutation of the binding motif led to failure of ZafA binding to the upstream region of CtrC and upregulation of CtrC expression under zinc starvation. Furthermore, the binding activity of ZafA to the upstream region of CtrC was inversely proportional to the zinc concentration, and copper inhibited the binding of ZafA to the upstream region of CtrC under a low zinc concentration. Taken together, these results suggest that ZafA upregulates copper metabolism by binding to the ZafA binding motif in the CtrC promoter region under low zinc concentration, thus regulating copper homeostasis. Furthermore, we found that copper and zinc interact in cells to maintain metal homeostasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Homeostasis and Resistance in Microbes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop