ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Ovarian Diseases and Dysfunction"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. SiHyun Cho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
Interests: endometriosis; miRNAs; uterine fibroids and adenomyosis
Prof. Dr. Jung Ryeol Lee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea
Interests: fertility preservation; regeneration of reproductive organs
Prof. Dr. Young Sik Choi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clinical science departments, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
Interests: infertility; assisted reproductive technology; reproductive endocrinology; polycystic ovary syndrome; regenerative medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ovary is one of the most dynamic and dramatic organs in the female body. It plays an essential role in human reproduction, with the main functions of steroid hormone and egg production. This can only be achieved by the synchronized interactions of various hormones in the hypothalamic–pituitary–ovarian axis at the appropriate time and place with appropriate quantities. Throughout female reproductive years, the ovaries work vigorously to achieve ovulation and tissue repair processes, ultimately becoming the first organ to age and become vulnerable to external stimulus. Damage to ovarian function can be devastating, leading to infertility and menopause.

We are now facing an era of slowing the ovary aging process and preserving fertility for future use. This Special Issue aims to focus on basic and translational research, as well as molecular and hormonal evidence, toward obtaining a more comprehensive understating of the pathophysiology of various ovarian diseases and dysfunctions that are related to fertility and/or metabolic/endocrine conditions and fertility preservation. Original research articles as well as mini and full reviews, including perspectives, are encouraged to shed light on the advances in the field of ovarian dysfunction and preservation.

Prof. Dr. SiHyun Cho
Prof. Dr. Jung Ryeol Lee
Prof. Dr. Young Sik Choi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ovarian Endometriosis
  • Fertility Preservation
  • Premature Ovarian Failure
  • Ovulatory Disorder
  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
  • Ovarian Reserve
  • Biomarkers
  • Ovarian Folliculogenesis
  • Ovarian Steroidogenesis
  • Regenerative Medicine

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
A Prepubertal Mice Model to Study the Growth Pattern of Early Ovarian Follicles
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(10), 5130; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22105130 - 12 May 2021
Viewed by 159
Abstract
Early folliculogenesis begins with the activation of the follicle and ends with the formation of the follicular antrum, which takes up most of the time of folliculogenesis. In this long process, follicles complete a series of developmental events, including but not limited to [...] Read more.
Early folliculogenesis begins with the activation of the follicle and ends with the formation of the follicular antrum, which takes up most of the time of folliculogenesis. In this long process, follicles complete a series of developmental events, including but not limited to granulosa cell (GC) proliferation, theca folliculi formation, and antrum formation. However, the logical or temporal sequence of these events is not entirely clear. This study demonstrated in a mouse model that completion of early folliculogenesis required a minimum of two weeks. The oocyte reached its largest size in the Type 4–5 stage, which was therefore considered as the optimum period for studying oogenesis. Postnatal days (PD) 10–12 were regarded as the crucial stage of theca folliculi formation, as Lhcgr sharply increased during this stage. PD13–15 was the rapid growth period of early follicles, which was characterized by rapid cell proliferation, the sudden emergence of the antrum, and increased Fshr expression. The ovarian morphology remained stable during PD15–21, but antrum follicles accumulated gradually. Atresia occurred at all stages, with the lowest rate in Type 3 follicles and no differences among early Type 4–6 follicles. The earliest vaginal opening was observed at PD24, almost immediately after the first growing follicular wave. Therefore, the period of PD22–23 could be considered as a suitable period for studying puberty initiation. This study objectively revealed the pattern of early folliculogenesis and provided time windows for the study of biological events in this process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ovarian Diseases and Dysfunction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Altered Composition of Microbiota in Women with Ovarian Endometrioma: Microbiome Analyses of Extracellular Vesicles in the Peritoneal Fluid
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(9), 4608; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22094608 - 27 Apr 2021
Viewed by 382
Abstract
Human microbiota refers to living microorganisms which colonize our body and crucially contribute to the metabolism of nutrients and various physiologic functions. According to recently accumulated evidence, human microbiota dysbiosis in the genital tract or pelvic cavity could be involved in the pathogenesis [...] Read more.
Human microbiota refers to living microorganisms which colonize our body and crucially contribute to the metabolism of nutrients and various physiologic functions. According to recently accumulated evidence, human microbiota dysbiosis in the genital tract or pelvic cavity could be involved in the pathogenesis and/or pathophysiology of endometriosis. We aimed to investigate whether the composition of microbiome is altered in the peritoneal fluid in women with endometriosis. We recruited 45 women with histological evidence of ovarian endometrioma and 45 surgical controls without endometriosis. Following the isolation of extracellular vesicles from peritoneal fluid samples from women with and without endometriosis, bacterial genomic DNA was sequenced using next-generation sequencing of the 16S rDNA V3–V4 regions. Diversity analysis showed significant differences in the microbial community at phylum, class, order, family, and genus levels between the two groups. The abundance of Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Enhydrobacter significantly increased while the abundance of Propionibacterium, Actinomyces, and Rothia significantly decreased in the endometriosis group compared with those in the control group (p < 0.05). These findings strongly suggest that microbiome composition is altered in the peritoneal environment in women with endometriosis. Further studies are necessary to verify whether dysbiosis itself can cause establishment and/or progression of endometriosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ovarian Diseases and Dysfunction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop