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Special Issue "Advanced Research in Plant Responses to Environmental Stresses"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Magdalena Arasimowicz-Jelonek
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plant Ecophysiology, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznan, Poland
Interests: plant immunity, cross-resistance; stress memory; reactive nitrogen species; oomycetes
Prof. Dr. Arkadiusz Kosmala
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Plant Physiology Team, Institute of Plant Genetics Polish Academy of Sciences, Strzeszyńska 34, 60-479 Poznań, Poland
Interests: plant physiology; drought tolerance; freezing tolerance; winterhardiness; photosynthesis
Dr. Ewa Sobieszczuk-Nowicka
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Biology, Department of Plant Physiology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Uniwersytetu Poznańskiego 6, 61-614 Poznań, Poland
Interests: barley; cell death; cell survival; epigenetics; leaf senescence; plant memory; stress responses
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plants constantly face various types of abiotic and biotic stresses that adversely affect plant fitness and crop yields. Plants’ survival and reproduction under these unfavorable conditions depend on their ability to respond quickly to the changing environment. In this respect, plants transduce the external stimuli through complex intracellular signaling pathways and networks to develop a coordinated molecular and physiological response at the local and systemic levels to minimize the deleterious effects of stress on their growth and development.

The aim of the Special Issue is an integrative and more in-depth understanding of the plant mechanisms through which plants respond to various environmental challenges. Articles on novel molecular mechanisms of stress responses, especially those involving small RNA molecules, chromatin modulation, and DNA/RNA modifications, are welcome. In addition, innovative contributions giving an overview of signaling events or presenting new signals and metabolites engaged in the stress response will help to understand the sophisticated mechanisms underlying stress resistance or tolerance at the whole plant level.

Prof. Dr. Magdalena Arasimowicz-Jelonek
Prof. Dr. Arkadiusz Kosmala
Dr. Ewa Sobieszczuk-Nowicka
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • abiotic/biotic stress
  • priming
  • cross-resistance
  • stress recognition and signaling
  • transgenerational stress memory
  • epimutations
  • epitranscriptional and co-translational control of stress responses
  • small RNAs and stress-responsive genes
  • RNA-directed DNA methylation
  • stress tolerance/plant immunity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
PDF1.5 Enhances Adaptation to Low Nitrogen Levels and Cadmium Stress
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(19), 10455; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms221910455 - 28 Sep 2021
Viewed by 190
Abstract
Environmental acclimation ability plays a key role in plant growth, although the mechanism remains unclear. Here, we determined the involvement of Arabidopsis thaliana PLANT DEFENSIN 1 gene AtPDF1.5 in the adaptation to low nitrogen (LN) levels and cadmium (Cd) stress. Histochemical analysis revealed [...] Read more.
Environmental acclimation ability plays a key role in plant growth, although the mechanism remains unclear. Here, we determined the involvement of Arabidopsis thaliana PLANT DEFENSIN 1 gene AtPDF1.5 in the adaptation to low nitrogen (LN) levels and cadmium (Cd) stress. Histochemical analysis revealed that AtPDF1.5 was mainly expressed in the nodes and carpopodium and was significantly induced in plants exposed to LN conditions and Cd stress. Subcellular localization analysis revealed that AtPDF1.5 was cell wall- and cytoplasm-localized. AtPDF1.5 overexpression significantly enhanced adaptation to LN and Cd stress and enhanced the distribution of metallic elements. The functional disruption of AtPDF1.5 reduced adaptations to LN and Cd stress and impaired metal distribution. Under LN conditions, the nitrate transporter AtNRT1.5 expression was upregulated. Nitrate transporter AtNRT1.8 expression was downregulated when AtPDF1.5 was overexpressed, resulting in enhanced transport of NO3 to shoots. In response to Cd treatment, AtPDF1.5 regulated the expression of metal transporter genes AtHMP07, AtNRAMP4, AtNRAMP1, and AtHIPP3, resulting in higher Cd accumulation in the shoots. We conclude that AtPDF1.5 is involved in the processing or transmission of signal substances and plays an important role in the remediation of Cd pollution and LN adaptation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research in Plant Responses to Environmental Stresses)
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Article
Behavioral and Physiological Plasticity Provides Insights into Molecular Based Adaptation Mechanism to Strain Shift in Spodoptera frugiperda
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(19), 10284; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms221910284 - 24 Sep 2021
Viewed by 314
Abstract
How herbivorous insects adapt to host plants is a key question in ecological and evolutionary biology. The fall armyworm, (FAW) Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), although polyphagous and a major pest on various crops, has been reported to have a rice and corn (maize) [...] Read more.
How herbivorous insects adapt to host plants is a key question in ecological and evolutionary biology. The fall armyworm, (FAW) Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), although polyphagous and a major pest on various crops, has been reported to have a rice and corn (maize) feeding strain in its native range in the Americas. The species is highly invasive and has recently established in China. We compared behavioral changes in larvae and adults of a corn population (Corn) when selected on rice (Rice) and the molecular basis of these adaptational changes in midgut and antennae based on a comparative transcriptome analysis. Larvae of S. frugiperda reared on rice plants continuously for 20 generations exhibited strong feeding preference for with higher larval performance and pupal weight on rice than on maize plants. Similarly, females from the rice selected population laid significantly more eggs on rice as compared to females from maize population. The most highly expressed DEGs were shown in the midgut of Rice vs. Corn. A total of 6430 DEGs were identified between the populations mostly in genes related to digestion and detoxification. These results suggest that potential adaptations for feeding on rice crops, may contribute to the current rapid spread of fall armyworm on rice crops in China and potentially elsewhere. Consistently, highly expressed DEGs were also shown in antennae; a total of 5125 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) s were identified related to the expansions of major chemosensory genes family in Rice compared to the Corn feeding population. These results not only provide valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms in host plants adaptation of S. frugiperda but may provide new gene targets for the management of this pest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research in Plant Responses to Environmental Stresses)
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Article
Proteome Changes Reveal the Protective Roles of Exogenous Citric Acid in Alleviating Cu Toxicity in Brassica napus L.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(11), 5879; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22115879 - 30 May 2021
Viewed by 992
Abstract
Citric acid (CA), as an organic chelator, plays a vital role in alleviating copper (Cu) stress-mediated oxidative damage, wherein a number of molecular mechanisms alter in plants. However, it remains largely unknown how CA regulates differentially abundant proteins (DAPs) in response to Cu [...] Read more.
Citric acid (CA), as an organic chelator, plays a vital role in alleviating copper (Cu) stress-mediated oxidative damage, wherein a number of molecular mechanisms alter in plants. However, it remains largely unknown how CA regulates differentially abundant proteins (DAPs) in response to Cu stress in Brassica napus L. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the proteome changes in the leaves of B. L. seedlings in response to CA-mediated alleviation of Cu stress. Exposure of 21-day-old seedlings to Cu (25 and 50 μM) and CA (1.0 mM) for 7 days exhibited a dramatic inhibition of overall growth and considerable increase in the enzymatic activities (POD, SOD, CAT). Using a label-free proteome approach, a total of 6345 proteins were identified in differentially treated leaves, from which 426 proteins were differentially expressed among the treatment groups. Gene ontology (GO) and KEGG pathways analysis revealed that most of the differential abundance proteins were found to be involved in energy and carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, protein metabolism, stress and defense, metal detoxification, and cell wall reorganization. Our results suggest that the downregulation of chlorophyll biosynthetic proteins involved in photosynthesis were consistent with reduced chlorophyll content. The increased abundance of proteins involved in stress and defense indicates that these DAPs might provide significant insights into the adaptation of Brassica seedlings to Cu stress. The abundances of key proteins were further verified by monitoring the mRNA expression level of the respective transcripts. Taken together, these findings provide a potential molecular mechanism towards Cu stress tolerance and open a new route in accelerating the phytoextraction of Cu through exogenous application of CA in B. napus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research in Plant Responses to Environmental Stresses)
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