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Special Issue "Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Communication and Their Control"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Xavier Latour
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Microbiology Signals and Microenvironment (LMSM EA 4312), Normandy University (University of Rouen Normandy), 55 rue Saint-Germain, 27000 Evreux, France
Interests: bacterial communication; signaling molecules; quorum-sensing; signaling and metabolic switches; proteomic and metabolomic; quorum-quenching; antivirulence; biocontrol
Dr. Corinne Barbey
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Microbiology Signals and Microenvironment (LMSM EA 4312), Normandy University (University of Rouen Normandy), 55 rue Saint-Germain, 27000 Evreux, France
Interests: plant bacteria interactions; bacterial communication; quorum-sensing; quorum-quenching; biocontrol; regulation of gene expression; molecular biology; proteomic

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ability of a bacterium to colonize and adapt to an ecological niche is highly dependent on its capacity to perceive and analyze its environment, in addition to its ability to interact with its hosts and congeners. Membrane sensors such as two-component systems are powerful tools that fulfill these functions. Bacteria use also cell-to-cell communication systems based on both the synthesis and perception of signaling molecules to synchronize their social behavior. These quorum-sensing systems control diverse functions and require the concerted actions of numerous cells in order to be productive, such as antibiotic synthesis, motility, symbiosis, biofilm maturation, sporulation, and virulence.

This Special Issue welcomes researchers who wish to contribute to the publication of research articles, reviews, and opinions addressing the molecular mechanisms of bacterial communication and/or their control, leading to mechanistic or applied progress.

Prof. Dr. Xavier Latour
Dr. Corinne Barbey
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microbial communication
  • host-microbes interactions and dialog
  • signaling molecules
  • histidine kinase sensors
  • quorum-sensing
  • social behavior
  • biofilm
  • anti-virulence
  • quorum-quenching
  • biocontrol

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Biocontrol of Biofilm Formation: Jamming of Sessile-Associated Rhizobial Communication by Rhodococcal Quorum-Quenching
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(15), 8241; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22158241 - 31 Jul 2021
Viewed by 647
Abstract
Biofilms are complex structures formed by a community of microbes adhering to a surface and/or to each other through the secretion of an adhesive and protective matrix. The establishment of these structures requires a coordination of action between microorganisms through powerful communication systems [...] Read more.
Biofilms are complex structures formed by a community of microbes adhering to a surface and/or to each other through the secretion of an adhesive and protective matrix. The establishment of these structures requires a coordination of action between microorganisms through powerful communication systems such as quorum-sensing. Therefore, auxiliary bacteria capable of interfering with these means of communication could be used to prevent biofilm formation and development. The phytopathogen Rhizobium rhizogenes, which causes hairy root disease and forms large biofilms in hydroponic crops, and the biocontrol agent Rhodococcus erythropolis R138 were used for this study. Changes in biofilm biovolume and structure, as well as interactions between rhizobia and rhodococci, were monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy with appropriate fluorescent biosensors. We obtained direct visual evidence of an exchange of signals between rhizobia and the jamming of this communication by Rhodococcus within the biofilm. Signaling molecules were characterized as long chain (C14) N-acyl-homoserine lactones. The role of the Qsd quorum-quenching pathway in biofilm alteration was confirmed with an R. erythropolis mutant unable to produce the QsdA lactonase, and by expression of the qsdA gene in a heterologous host, Escherichia coli. Finally, Rhizobium biofilm formation was similarly inhibited by a purified extract of QsdA enzyme. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Communication and Their Control)
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Review

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Review
Nitrate- and Nitrite-Sensing Histidine Kinases: Function, Structure, and Natural Diversity
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(11), 5933; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22115933 - 31 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1191
Abstract
Under anaerobic conditions, bacteria may utilize nitrates and nitrites as electron acceptors. Sensitivity to nitrous compounds is achieved via several mechanisms, some of which rely on sensor histidine kinases (HKs). The best studied nitrate- and nitrite-sensing HKs (NSHKs) are NarQ and NarX from [...] Read more.
Under anaerobic conditions, bacteria may utilize nitrates and nitrites as electron acceptors. Sensitivity to nitrous compounds is achieved via several mechanisms, some of which rely on sensor histidine kinases (HKs). The best studied nitrate- and nitrite-sensing HKs (NSHKs) are NarQ and NarX from Escherichia coli. Here, we review the function of NSHKs, analyze their natural diversity, and describe the available structural information. In particular, we show that around 6000 different NSHK sequences forming several distinct clusters may now be found in genomic databases, comprising mostly the genes from Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria as well as from Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi, including those from anaerobic ammonia oxidation (annamox) communities. We show that the architecture of NSHKs is mostly conserved, although proteins from Bacteroidetes lack the HAMP and GAF-like domains yet sometimes have PAS. We reconcile the variation of NSHK sequences with atomistic models and pinpoint the structural elements important for signal transduction from the sensor domain to the catalytic module over the transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions spanning more than 200 Å. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Communication and Their Control)
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