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Special Issue "Dietary Bioactive Compounds and Breast Cancer"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Antonio González-Sarrías
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Food and Health, Food and Technology Department, National Council for Scientific Research (CEBAS-CSIC), Murcia, Spain
Interests: food and health; bioactive compounds; polyphenols; cell culture and animal models; clinical trials; cardiovascular; cancer; inflammation
Dr. Juan Antonio Giménez-Bastida
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Food and Health, Food and Technology Department, National Council for Scientific Research (CEBAS-CSIC), Murcia, Spain
Interests: polyphenols; in vitro; in vivo; pharmacology; eicosanoids; inflammation; cardiovascular; health; bioactive molecules

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Breast cancer is the most common occurring cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Over 80% of cases are non-hereditary, and therefore, modifiable extrinsic factors related to lifestyle, including dietary habits, play a key role in its prevention. Plant foodstuff is the most important source of bioactive compounds, including polyphenols, carotenoids, phytosterols and others, that have been reported to exert anticancer effects by playing a broad range of pleiotropic multi-targeted activities on breast cancer cells and animal models. Although many epidemiological and observational studies have inversely correlated the fruits and vegetables consumption with breast cancer incidence, the involvement of their phytochemicals remains still contradictory. Over the past decades, wrong approaches without considering their bioavailability and metabolism have been behind the current gap between preclinical and clinical research.

Therefore, this Special Issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences will publish original research and review papers on the chemopreventive and/or chemosensitization effects to breast cancer of dietary bioactive compounds and/or derived metabolites using physiologically relevant preclinical (cell and animal models) and clinical approaches, that could elucidate if they are responsible for the effects attributed to plant-based foods.

Dr. Antonio González-Sarrías
Dr. Juan Antonio Giménez-Bastida
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • chemoprevention
  • plant foods
  • phytochemicals
  • phytoestrogens
  • polyphenols
  • bioavailability studies
  • clinical trials
  • animal and cellular studies
  • anti-cancer mechanisms

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Chrysoeriol Prevents TNFα-Induced CYP19 Gene Expression via EGR-1 Downregulation in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(20), 7523; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21207523 - 12 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 681
Abstract
Estrogen overproduction is closely associated with the development of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Aromatase, encoded by the cytochrome P450 19 (CYP19) gene, regulates estrogen biosynthesis. This study aimed to identify active flavones that inhibit CYP19 expression and to explore the underlying mechanisms. CYP19 [...] Read more.
Estrogen overproduction is closely associated with the development of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Aromatase, encoded by the cytochrome P450 19 (CYP19) gene, regulates estrogen biosynthesis. This study aimed to identify active flavones that inhibit CYP19 expression and to explore the underlying mechanisms. CYP19 expression was evaluated using reverse transcription PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, and immunoblot analysis. The role of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) in CYP19 expression was assessed using the short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of EGR-1 expression in estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We screened 39 flavonoids containing 26 flavones and 13 flavanones using the EGR1 promoter reporter activity assay and observed that chrysoeriol exerted the highest inhibitory activity on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-induced EGR-1 expression. We further characterized and demonstrated that chrysoeriol inhibits TNFα-induced CYP19 expression through inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2)-mediated EGR-1 expression. Chrysoeriol may be beneficial as a dietary supplement for the prevention of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, or as a chemotherapeutic adjuvant in the treatment of this condition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bioactive Compounds and Breast Cancer)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Why Vitamin C Could Be an Excellent Complementary Remedy to Conventional Therapies for Breast Cancer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(21), 8397; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21218397 - 09 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 717
Abstract
The most frequent cancer in women is breast cancer, which is a major cause of death. Currently, there are many pharmacological therapies that have made possible the cure and resolution of this tumor. However, these therapies are accompanied by numerous collateral effects that [...] Read more.
The most frequent cancer in women is breast cancer, which is a major cause of death. Currently, there are many pharmacological therapies that have made possible the cure and resolution of this tumor. However, these therapies are accompanied by numerous collateral effects that influence the quality of life (QoL) of the patients to varying degrees. For this reason, attention is turning to the use of complementary medicine to improve QoL. In particular, there are increased trials of intravenous injection of vitamin C at high doses to enhance the antitumor activity of drugs and/or decrease their side effects. This review intends to underline the anticancer mechanisms of vitamin C that could explain its efficacy for treating breast cancer, and why the use of vitamin C at high doses could help patients with breast cancer to enhance the efficacy of pharmacological therapies and/or decrease their side effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bioactive Compounds and Breast Cancer)
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Open AccessReview
Dietary Phenolics against Breast Cancer. A Critical Evidence-Based Review and Future Perspectives
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(16), 5718; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21165718 - 10 Aug 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1037
Abstract
Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignancy and the leading cause of cancer-related death in adult women worldwide. Over 85% of BC cases are non-hereditary, caused by modifiable extrinsic factors related to lifestyle, including dietary habits, which play a crucial role in [...] Read more.
Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignancy and the leading cause of cancer-related death in adult women worldwide. Over 85% of BC cases are non-hereditary, caused by modifiable extrinsic factors related to lifestyle, including dietary habits, which play a crucial role in cancer prevention. Although many epidemiological and observational studies have inversely correlated the fruit and vegetable consumption with the BC incidence, the involvement of their phenolic content in this correlation remains contradictory. During decades, wrong approaches that did not consider the bioavailability, metabolism, and breast tissue distribution of dietary phenolics persist behind the large currently existing gap between preclinical and clinical research. In the present review, we provide comprehensive preclinical and clinical evidence according to physiologically relevant in vitro and in vivo studies. Some dietary phenolics such as resveratrol (RSV), quercetin, isoflavones, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), lignans, and curcumin are gaining attention for their chemopreventive properties in preclinical research. However, the clinical evidence of dietary phenolics as BC chemopreventive compounds is still inconclusive. Therefore, the only way to validate promising preclinical results is to conduct clinical trials in BC patients. In this regard, future perspectives on dietary phenolics and BC research are also critically discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bioactive Compounds and Breast Cancer)
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