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Special Issue "Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (17 March 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Cory J. Xian
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
Interests: growth plate biology and bone growth; mechanisms of injury repair and regeneration; skeletal cells and bone remodeling; biological treatments

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bones support the body and enable its movement; they also house stem cells, produce blood cells, and act as a mineral reservoir and as an endocrine organ. Bone growth and maintenance occur via modeling and remodeling, and bone formation and bone resorption are two coordinated processes by which bone mass, integrity, and strength are maintained. Recently, there have been significant molecular and cellular research advances on bone development, bone remodeling, bone fracture healing, and the pathophysiology of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis and other disorders. A better understanding of their physiological or pathophysiological mechanisms could facilitate development of better strategies to optimize bone growth, build peak bone mass, promote fracture healing, and prevent/treat osteoporosis and other disorders. The purpose of this Special Issue is to report advances in molecular and cellular research into bone growth, remodeling, fracture healing, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and other disorders.

Original research or review articles are invited that report on:

  • Mechanisms regulating skeletal cells or their precursor cells, bone angiogenesis, bone modeling and remodeling;
  • Regulatory signals for fracture repair and pathophysiology for impaired healing or non-union;
  • Genetics and pathogenesis of osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and other disorders;
  • New treatment strategies for bone fractures and other bone disorders.

Prof. Dr. Cory J. Xian
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (25 papers)

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Research

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Article
A Simple Procedure for the Evaluation of Bone Vitality by Staining with a Tetrazolium Salt
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(8), 1646; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18081646 - 28 Jul 2017
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2208
Abstract
Presently, no intra-operative method for a direct assessment of bone vitality exists. Therefore, we set out to test the applicability of tetrazolium-based staining on bone samples. The explanted femoral heads of 37 patients were used to obtain either cancellous bone fragments or bone [...] Read more.
Presently, no intra-operative method for a direct assessment of bone vitality exists. Therefore, we set out to test the applicability of tetrazolium-based staining on bone samples. The explanted femoral heads of 37 patients were used to obtain either cancellous bone fragments or bone slices. Samples were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyl-2H-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) or 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (thiazolyl blue, MTT) at different times (one to twelve hours) after explantation. Staining was quantified either spectrophotometrically after extraction of the dyes or by densitometric image analysis. TTC-staining of cancellous bone fragments and bone slices, respectively, indicated the detectability of vital cells in both types of samples in a window of up to six hours after explantation. Staining intensity at later time-points was indistinguishable from the staining of untreated samples or sodium azide treated samples, which represent dead cells. In contrast, MTT-staining of bone slices revealed intense unspecific staining, which obscured the evaluation of the vitality of the samples. The lack of a detectable increase of colour intensity in TTC-stained bone samples, which were treated more than six hours after explantation, corresponds to reduced fracture healing. The described simple procedure could provide a basis for an intraoperative decision by the orthopaedic surgeon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
FGF-2 Gene Polymorphism in Osteoporosis among Guangxi’s Zhuang Chinese
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(7), 1358; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18071358 - 27 Jun 2017
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2041
Abstract
Osteoporosis is a complex multifactorial disorder of gradual bone loss and increased fracture risk. While previous studies have shown the importance of many genetic factors in determining peak bone mass and fragility fractures and in suggesting involvement of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis is a complex multifactorial disorder of gradual bone loss and increased fracture risk. While previous studies have shown the importance of many genetic factors in determining peak bone mass and fragility fractures and in suggesting involvement of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) in bone metabolism and bone mass, the relationship of FGF-2 genetic diversity with bone mass/osteoporosis has not yet been revealed. The current study investigated the potential relevance of FGF-2 gene polymorphism in osteoporosis among a Zhuang ethnic Chinese cohort of 623, including 237 normal bone mass controls, 227 osteopenia, and 159 osteoporosis of different ages. Bone density was examined by calcaneus ultrasound attenuation measurement, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and linkage disequilibrium analyses were performed on five SNP loci of FGF-2 gene. Significant differences were found in bone mass in males between the 45-year-old and ≥70-year-old groups (p < 0.01), and in females among 55, 60, 65 and 70-year-old groups (p < 0.05). Males had higher bone mass values than females in the same age (over 55-year-old) (p < 0.05). The proportions of individuals with normal bone mass decreased with age (65.2% to 40% in males, and 50% to 0% in females), whereas prevalence of osteoporosis increased with age (15.4% to 30% in men, and 7.7% to 82% in women). Out of five FGF-2 SNP loci, the TA genotype of rs308442 in the osteoporosis group (40.2%) was higher than in the control group (29.5%) (p < 0.05). The TA genotype was significantly correlated with the risk of osteoporosis (odds ratio OR = 1.653), 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.968–1.441). Strong linkage disequilibrium in FGF-2 gene was also detected between rs12644427 and rs3747676, between rs12644427 and rs3789138, and between rs3747676 and rs3789138 (D’ > 0.8, and r2 > 0.33). Thus, the rs308442 locus of FGF-2 gene is closely correlated to osteoporosis in this Zhuang ethnic Chinese cohort, and the TA may be the risk genotype of osteoporosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
Quantification of Bone Fatty Acid Metabolism and Its Regulation by Adipocyte Lipoprotein Lipase
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(6), 1264; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18061264 - 13 Jun 2017
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 3403
Abstract
Adipocytes are master regulators of energy homeostasis. Although the contributions of classical brown and white adipose tissue (BAT and WAT, respectively) to glucose and fatty acid metabolism are well characterized, the metabolic role of adipocytes in bone marrow remains largely unclear. Here, we [...] Read more.
Adipocytes are master regulators of energy homeostasis. Although the contributions of classical brown and white adipose tissue (BAT and WAT, respectively) to glucose and fatty acid metabolism are well characterized, the metabolic role of adipocytes in bone marrow remains largely unclear. Here, we quantify bone fatty acid metabolism and its contribution to systemic nutrient handling in mice. Whereas in parts of the skeleton the specific amount of nutrients taken-up from the circulation was lower than in other metabolically active tissues such as BAT or liver, the overall contribution of the skeleton as a whole organ was remarkable, placing it among the top organs involved in systemic glucose as well as fatty acid clearance. We show that there are considerable site-specific variations in bone marrow fatty acid composition throughout the skeleton and that, especially in the tibia, marrow fatty acid profiles resemble classical BAT and WAT. Using a mouse model lacking lipoprotein lipase (LPL), a master regulator of plasma lipid turnover specifically in adipocytes, we show that impaired fatty acid flux leads to reduced amounts of dietary essential fatty acids while there was a profound increase in de novo produced fatty acids in both bone marrow and cortical bone. Notably, these changes in fatty acid profiles were not associated with any gross skeletal phenotype. These results identify LPL as an important regulator of fatty acid transport to skeletal compartments and demonstrate an intricate functional link between systemic and skeletal fatty acid and glucose metabolism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
A Histopathological Scheme for the Quantitative Scoring of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration and the Therapeutic Utility of Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Intervertebral Disc Regeneration
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 1049; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18051049 - 12 May 2017
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 2823
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to develop a quantitative histopathological scoring scheme to evaluate disc degeneration and regeneration using an ovine annular lesion model of experimental disc degeneration. Toluidine blue and Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining were used to evaluate cellular morphology: [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to develop a quantitative histopathological scoring scheme to evaluate disc degeneration and regeneration using an ovine annular lesion model of experimental disc degeneration. Toluidine blue and Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining were used to evaluate cellular morphology: (i) disc structure/lesion morphology; (ii) proteoglycan depletion; (iii) cellular morphology; (iv) blood vessel in-growth; (v) cell influx into lesion; and (vi) cystic degeneration/chondroid metaplasia. Three study groups were examined: 5 × 5 mm lesion; 6 × 20 mm lesion; and 6 × 20 mm lesion plus mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) treatment. Lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs) were scored under categories (i–vi) to provide a cumulative score, which underwent statistical analysis using STATA software. Focal proteoglycan depletion was associated with 5 × 5 mm annular rim lesions, bifurcations, annular delamellation, concentric and radial annular tears and an early influx of blood vessels and cells around remodeling lesions but the inner lesion did not heal. Similar features in 6 × 20 mm lesions occurred over a 3–6-month post operative period. MSCs induced a strong recovery in discal pathology with a reduction in cumulative histopathology degeneracy score from 15.2 to 2.7 (p = 0.001) over a three-month recovery period but no recovery in carrier injected discs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
Decrease of miR-195 Promotes Chondrocytes Proliferation and Maintenance of Chondrogenic Phenotype via Targeting FGF-18 Pathway
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 975; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18050975 - 04 May 2017
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 2783
Abstract
Slow growth and rapid loss of chondrogenic phenotypes are the major problems affecting chronic cartilage lesions. The role of microRNA-195 (miR-195) and its detailed working mechanism in the fore-mentioned process remains unknown. Fibroblastic growth factor 18 (FGF-18) plays a key role in cartilage [...] Read more.
Slow growth and rapid loss of chondrogenic phenotypes are the major problems affecting chronic cartilage lesions. The role of microRNA-195 (miR-195) and its detailed working mechanism in the fore-mentioned process remains unknown. Fibroblastic growth factor 18 (FGF-18) plays a key role in cartilage homeostasis; whether miR-195 could regulate FGF-18 and its downstream signal pathway in chondrocyte proliferation and maintenance of chondrogenic phenotypes still remains unclear. The present research shows elevated miR-195 but depressed FGF-18 expressed in joint fluid specimens of 20 patients with chronic cartilage lesions and in CH1M and CH3M chondrocytes when compared with that in joint fluid specimens without cartilage lesions and in CH1W and CH2W chondrocytes, respectively. The following loss of function test revealed that downregulation of miR-195 by transfection of miR-195 inhibitors promoted chondrocyte proliferation and expression of a type II collagen α I chain (Col2a1)/aggrecan. Through the online informatics analysis we theoretically predicted that miR-195 could bind to a FGF-18 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR), also, we verified that a miR-195 could regulate the FGF-18 and its downstream pathway. The constructed dual luciferase assay further confirmed that FGF-18 was a direct target of miR-195. The executed anti-sense experiment displayed that miR-195 could regulate chondrocyte proliferation and Col2a1/aggrecan expression via the FGF-18 pathway. Finally, through an in vivo anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model, downregulation of miR-195 presented a significantly protective effect on chronic cartilage lesions. Evaluating all of the outcomes of the current research revealed that a decrease of miR-195 protected chronic cartilage lesions by promoting chondrocyte proliferation and maintenance of chondrogenic phenotypes via the targeting of the FGF-18 pathway and that the miR-195/FGF-18 axis could be a potential target in the treatment of cartilage lesions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
Role of RHEB in Regulating Differentiation Fate of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage and Bone Regeneration
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 880; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18040880 - 24 Apr 2017
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2868
Abstract
Advances in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cell replacement therapies are promising approaches to treat cartilage and bone defects since substantial differentiation capacities of MSCs match the demands of tissue regeneration. Our understanding of the dynamic process requiring indispensable differentiation of MSCs remains [...] Read more.
Advances in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cell replacement therapies are promising approaches to treat cartilage and bone defects since substantial differentiation capacities of MSCs match the demands of tissue regeneration. Our understanding of the dynamic process requiring indispensable differentiation of MSCs remains limited. Herein, we describe the role of RHEB (Ras homolog enriched in brain) regulating gene signature for differentiation of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) into chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic lineages. RHEB-overexpression increases the proliferation of the ASCs. RHEB enhances the chondrogenic differentiation of ASCs in 3D culture via upregulation of SOX9 with concomitant increase in glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and type II collagen (COL2). RHEB increases the osteogenesis via upregulation of runt related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) with an increase in the calcium and phosphate contents. RHEB also increases the expression of osteogenic markers, osteonectin and osteopontin. RHEB knockdown ASCs were incapable of expressing sufficient SRY (Sex determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9) and RUNX2, and therefore had decreased chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation. RHEB-overexpression impaired ASCs differentiation into adipogenic lineage, through downregulation of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPβ). Conversely, RHEB knockdown abolished the negative regulation of adipogenesis. We demonstrate that RHEB is a novel regulator, with a critical role in ASCs lineage determination, and RHEB-modulated ASCs may be useful as a cell therapy for cartilage and bone defect treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
A Pronounced Inflammatory Activity Characterizes the Early Fracture Healing Phase in Immunologically Restricted Patients
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(3), 583; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18030583 - 08 Mar 2017
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 3853
Abstract
Immunologically restricted patients such as those with autoimmune diseases or malignancies often suffer from delayed or insufficient fracture healing. In human fracture hematomas and the surrounding bone marrow obtained from immunologically restricted patients, we analyzed the initial inflammatory phase on cellular and humoral [...] Read more.
Immunologically restricted patients such as those with autoimmune diseases or malignancies often suffer from delayed or insufficient fracture healing. In human fracture hematomas and the surrounding bone marrow obtained from immunologically restricted patients, we analyzed the initial inflammatory phase on cellular and humoral level via flow cytometry and multiplex suspension array. Compared with controls, we demonstrated higher numbers of immune cells like monocytes/macrophages, natural killer T (NKT) cells, and activated T helper cells within the fracture hematomas and/or the surrounding bone marrow. Also, several pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin (IL)-6 and Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), chemokines (e.g., Eotaxin and RANTES), pro-angiogenic factors (e.g., IL-8 and Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: MIF), and regulatory cytokines (e.g., IL-10) were found at higher levels within the fracture hematomas and/or the surrounding bone marrow of immunologically restricted patients when compared to controls. We conclude here that the inflammatory activity on cellular and humoral levels at fracture sites of immunologically restricted patients considerably exceeds that of control patients. The initial inflammatory phase profoundly differs between these patient groups and is probably one of the reasons for prolonged or insufficient fracture healing often occurring within immunologically restricted patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
Methyl Gallate Inhibits Osteoclast Formation and Function by Suppressing Akt and Btk-PLCγ2-Ca2+ Signaling and Prevents Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Bone Loss
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(3), 581; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18030581 - 07 Mar 2017
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2405
Abstract
In the field of bone research, various natural derivatives have emerged as candidates for osteoporosis treatment by targeting abnormally elevated osteoclastic activity. Methyl gallate, a plant-derived phenolic compound, is known to have numerous pharmacological effects against inflammation, oxidation, and cancer. Our purpose was [...] Read more.
In the field of bone research, various natural derivatives have emerged as candidates for osteoporosis treatment by targeting abnormally elevated osteoclastic activity. Methyl gallate, a plant-derived phenolic compound, is known to have numerous pharmacological effects against inflammation, oxidation, and cancer. Our purpose was to explore the relation between methyl gallate and bone metabolism. Herein, we performed screening using methyl gallate by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and revealed intracellular mechanisms responsible for methyl gallate-mediated regulation of osteoclastogenesis by Western blotting and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Furthermore, we assessed the effects of methyl gallate on the characteristics of mature osteoclasts. We found that methyl gallate significantly suppressed osteoclast formation through Akt and Btk-PLCγ2-Ca2+ signaling. The blockade of these pathways was confirmed through transduction of cells with a CA-Akt retrovirus and evaluation of Ca2+ influx intensity (staining with Fluo-3/AM). Indeed, methyl gallate downregulated the formation of actin ring-positive osteoclasts and resorption pit areas. In agreement with in vitro results, we found that administration of methyl gallate restored osteoporotic phenotype stimulated by acute systemic injection of lipopolysaccharide in vivo according to micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. Our data strongly indicate that methyl gallate may be useful for the development of a plant-based antiosteoporotic agent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
Evidence of the Role of R-Spondin 1 and Its Receptor Lgr4 in the Transmission of Mechanical Stimuli to Biological Signals for Bone Formation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(3), 564; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18030564 - 07 Mar 2017
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 3471
Abstract
The bone can adjust its mass and architecture to mechanical stimuli via a series of molecular cascades, which have been not yet fully elucidated. Emerging evidence indicated that R-spondins (Rspos), a family of secreted agonists of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, had important roles [...] Read more.
The bone can adjust its mass and architecture to mechanical stimuli via a series of molecular cascades, which have been not yet fully elucidated. Emerging evidence indicated that R-spondins (Rspos), a family of secreted agonists of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, had important roles in osteoblastic differentiation and bone formation. However, the role of Rspo proteins in mechanical loading-influenced bone metabolism has never been investigated. In this study, we found that Rspo1 was a mechanosensitive protein for bone formation. Continuous cyclic mechanical stretch (CMS) upregulated the expression of Rspo1 in mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), while the expression of Rspo1 in BMSCs in vivo was downregulated in the bones of a mechanical unloading mouse model (tail suspension (TS)). On the other hand, Rspo1 could promote osteogenesis of BMSCs under CMS through activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and could rescue the bone loss induced by mechanical unloading in the TS mice. Specifically, our results suggested that Rspo1 and its receptor of leucine-rich repeat containing G-protein-coupled receptor 4 (Lgr4) should be a novel molecular signal in the transmission of mechanical stimuli to biological signal in the bone, and this signal should be in the upstream of Wnt/β-catenin signaling for bone formation. Rspo1/Lgr4 could be a new potential target for the prevention and treatment of disuse osteoporosis in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
Bajijiasu Abrogates Osteoclast Differentiation via the Suppression of RANKL Signaling Pathways through NF-κB and NFAT
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(1), 203; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18010203 - 19 Jan 2017
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 3359
Abstract
Pathological osteolysis is commonly associated with osteoporosis, bone tumors, osteonecrosis, and chronic inflammation. It involves excessive resorption of bone matrix by activated osteoclasts. Suppressing receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) signaling pathways has been proposed to be a good target for inhibiting osteoclast [...] Read more.
Pathological osteolysis is commonly associated with osteoporosis, bone tumors, osteonecrosis, and chronic inflammation. It involves excessive resorption of bone matrix by activated osteoclasts. Suppressing receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) signaling pathways has been proposed to be a good target for inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. Bajijiasu—a natural compound derived from Morinda officinalis F. C. How—has previously been shown to have anti-oxidative stress property; however, its effect and molecular mechanism of action on osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption remains unclear. In the present study, we found that Bajijiasu dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption from 0.1 mM, and reached half maximal inhibitory effects (IC50) at 0.4 mM without toxicity. Expression of RANKL-induced osteoclast specific marker genes including cathepsin K (Ctsk), nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP), vacuolar-type H+-ATPase V0 subunit D2 (V-ATPase d2), and (matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) was inhibited by Bajijiasu treatment. Luciferase reporter gene studies showed that Bajijiasu could significantly reduce the expression and transcriptional activity of NFAT as well as RANKL-induced NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner. Further, Bajijiasu was found to decrease the RANKL-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), inhibitor of κB-α (IκB-α), NFAT, and V-ATPase d2. Taken together, this study revealed Bajijiasu could attenuate osteoclast formation and bone resorption by mediating RANKL signaling pathways, indicative of a potential effect of Bajijiasu on osteolytic bone diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
Hydrostatic Pressure Regulates MicroRNA Expression Levels in Osteoarthritic Chondrocyte Cultures via the Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(1), 133; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18010133 - 12 Jan 2017
Cited by 46 | Viewed by 3006
Abstract
Mechanical loading and hydrostatic pressure (HP) regulate chondrocytes’ metabolism; however, how mechanical stimulation acts remain unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in cartilage homeostasis, mechanotransduction, and in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). This study investigated the effects of a cyclic HP (1–5 [...] Read more.
Mechanical loading and hydrostatic pressure (HP) regulate chondrocytes’ metabolism; however, how mechanical stimulation acts remain unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in cartilage homeostasis, mechanotransduction, and in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). This study investigated the effects of a cyclic HP (1–5 MPa), in both normal and OA human chondrocytes, on the expression of miR-27a/b, miR-140, miR-146a/b, and miR-365, and of their target genes (MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, IGFBP-5, and HDAC-4). Furthermore, we assessed the possible involvement of Wnt/β-catenin pathway in response to HP. Chondrocytes were exposed to HP for 3h and the evaluations were performed immediately after pressurization, and following 12, 24, and 48 h. Total RNA was extracted and used for real-time PCR. β-catenin was detected by Western blotting analysis and immunofluorescence. In OA chondrocytes, HP induced a significant increase (p < 0.01) of the expression levels of miR-27a/b, miR-140, and miR-146a, and a significant reduction (p < 0.01) of miR-365 at all analyzed time points. MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, and HDAC-4 were significantly downregulated following HP, while no significant modification was found for IGFBP-5. β-catenin levels were significantly increased (p < 0.001) in OA chondrocytes at basal conditions and significantly reduced (p < 0.01) by HP. Pressurization did not cause any significant modification in normal cells. In conclusion, in OA chondrocytes, HP restores the expression levels of some miRNAs, downregulates MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, and HDAC-4, and modulates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
Evaluation of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Labeled Chondrocytes Cultivated on a Type II Collagen–Chitosan/Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid Biphasic Scaffold
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(1), 87; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18010087 - 04 Jan 2017
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 2735
Abstract
Chondral or osteochondral defects are still controversial problems in orthopedics. Here, chondrocytes labeled with magnetic nanoparticles were cultivated on a biphasic, type II collagen–chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold in an attempt to develop cultures with trackable cells exhibiting growth, differentiation, and regeneration. Rabbit chondrocytes were [...] Read more.
Chondral or osteochondral defects are still controversial problems in orthopedics. Here, chondrocytes labeled with magnetic nanoparticles were cultivated on a biphasic, type II collagen–chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold in an attempt to develop cultures with trackable cells exhibiting growth, differentiation, and regeneration. Rabbit chondrocytes were labeled with magnetic nanoparticles and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron (TEM) microscopy, and gene and protein expression analyses. The experimental results showed that the magnetic nanoparticles did not affect the phenotype of chondrocytes after cell labeling, nor were protein and gene expression affected. The biphasic type II collagen–chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid scaffold was characterized by SEM, and labeled chondrocytes showed a homogeneous distribution throughout the scaffold after cultivation onto the polymer. Cellular phenotype remained unaltered but with increased gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan, as indicated by cell staining, indicating chondrogenesis. Decreased SRY-related high mobility group-box gene (Sox-9) levels of cultured chondrocytes indicated that differentiation was associated with osteogenesis. These results are encouraging for the development of techniques for trackable cartilage regeneration and osteochondral defect repair which may be applied in vivo and, eventually, in clinical trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
Dmp1 Promoter-Driven Diphtheria Toxin Receptor Transgene Expression Directs Unforeseen Effects in Multiple Tissues
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(1), 29; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18010029 - 26 Dec 2016
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2571
Abstract
Mice harbouring a dentin matrix protein 1 (Dmp1) promoter-driven human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor (HDTR) transgene (Tg) have recently been used to attain targeted ablation of osteocytes by diphtheria toxin (DT) treatment in order to define osteocyte function. Use [...] Read more.
Mice harbouring a dentin matrix protein 1 (Dmp1) promoter-driven human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor (HDTR) transgene (Tg) have recently been used to attain targeted ablation of osteocytes by diphtheria toxin (DT) treatment in order to define osteocyte function. Use of these Tg mice has asserted mechano- and novel paracrine regulatory osteocyte functions. To explore osteocyte roles fully, we sought to confirm the selectivity of DT effects in these transgenic mice. However, our findings revealed incomplete DT-induced osteocyte ablation, prevalent HDTR misexpression, as well as more prominent histopathological DT-induced changes in multiple organs in Tg than in wild-type (WT) littermate mice. Mechanistic evidence for DT action, via prominent regulation of phosphorylation status of elongation factor-2 (EF-2), was also found in many non-skeletal tissues in Tg mice; indicative of direct “off-target” DT action. Finally, very rapid deterioration in health and welfare status in response to DT treatment was observed in these Tg when compared to WT control mice. Together, these data lead us to conclude that alternative models for osteocyte ablation should be sought and caution be exercised when drawing conclusions from experiments using these Tg mice alone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
Neuropeptide Y1 Receptor Regulates Glucocorticoid-Induced Inhibition of Osteoblast Differentiation in Murine MC3T3-E1 Cells via ERK Signaling
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(12), 2150; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17122150 - 21 Dec 2016
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3444
Abstract
High dose glucocorticoid (GC) administration impairs the viability and function of osteoblasts, thus causing osteoporosis and osteonecrosis. Neuropeptide Y1 receptor (Y1 receptor) is expressed in bone tissues and cells, and regulates bone remodeling. However, the role of Y1 receptor in glucocorticoid-induced inhibition of [...] Read more.
High dose glucocorticoid (GC) administration impairs the viability and function of osteoblasts, thus causing osteoporosis and osteonecrosis. Neuropeptide Y1 receptor (Y1 receptor) is expressed in bone tissues and cells, and regulates bone remodeling. However, the role of Y1 receptor in glucocorticoid-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation remains unknown. In the present study, osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 cultured in osteogenic differentiation medium was treated with or without of 10−7 M dexamethasone (Dex), Y1 receptor shRNA interference, Y1 receptor agonist [Leu31, Pro34]-NPY, and antagonist BIBP3226. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and cleaved caspase expression, respectively. Osteoblast differentiation was evaluated by Alizarin Red S staining and osteogenic marker gene expressions. Protein expression was detected by Western blot analysis. Dex upregulated the expression of Y1 receptor in MC3T3-E1 cells associated with reduced osteogenic gene expressions and mineralization. Blockade of Y1 receptor by shRNA transfection and BIBP3226 significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of Dex on osteoblastic activity. Y1 receptor signaling modulated the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) as well as the expressions of osteogenic genes. Y1 receptor agonist inhibited ERK phosphorylation and osteoblast differentiation, while Y1 receptor blockade exhibited the opposite effects. Activation of ERK signaling by constitutive active mutant of MEK1 (caMEK) abolished Y1 receptor-mediated Dex inhibition of osteoblast differentiation in MC3T3-E1 cells. Taken together, Y1 receptor regulates Dex-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation in murine MC3T3-E1 cells via ERK signaling. This study provides a novel role of Y1 receptor in the process of GC-induced suppression in osteoblast survival and differentiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
Discovery of a New Class of Cathepsin K Inhibitors in Rhizoma Drynariae as Potential Candidates for the Treatment of Osteoporosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(12), 2116; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17122116 - 16 Dec 2016
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2670
Abstract
Rhizoma Drynariae (RD), as one of the most common clinically used folk medicines, has been reported to exert potent anti-osteoporotic activity. The bioactive ingredients and mechanisms that account for its bone protective effects are under active investigation. Here we adopt a novel in [...] Read more.
Rhizoma Drynariae (RD), as one of the most common clinically used folk medicines, has been reported to exert potent anti-osteoporotic activity. The bioactive ingredients and mechanisms that account for its bone protective effects are under active investigation. Here we adopt a novel in silico target fishing method to reveal the target profile of RD. Cathepsin K (Ctsk) is one of the cysteine proteases that is over-expressed in osteoclasts and accounts for the increase in bone resorption in metabolic bone disorders such as postmenopausal osteoporosis. It has been the focus of target based drug discovery in recent years. We have identified two components in RD, Kushennol F and Sophoraflavanone G, that can potentially interact with Ctsk. Biological studies were performed to verify the effects of these compounds on Ctsk and its related bone resorption process, which include the use of in vitro fluorescence-based Ctsk enzyme assay, bone resorption pit formation assay, as well as Receptor Activator of Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis using murine RAW264.7 cells. Finally, the binding mode and stability of these two compounds that interact with Ctsk were determined by molecular docking and dynamics methods. The results showed that the in silico target fishing method could successfully identify two components from RD that show inhibitory effects on the bone resorption process related to protease Ctsk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
Amyloid β Peptide Enhances RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Activation through NF-κB, ERK, and Calcium Oscillation Signaling
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(10), 1683; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17101683 - 10 Oct 2016
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 3959
Abstract
Osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are common chronic degenerative disorders which are strongly associated with advanced age. We have previously demonstrated that amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, accumulated abnormally in osteoporotic bone specimens in addition to having [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are common chronic degenerative disorders which are strongly associated with advanced age. We have previously demonstrated that amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, accumulated abnormally in osteoporotic bone specimens in addition to having an activation effect on osteoclast (Bone 2014,61:164-75). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Activation of NF-κB, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylates, and calcium oscillation signaling pathways by receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL) plays a pivotal role in osteoclast activation. Targeting this signaling to modulate osteoclast function has been a promising strategy for osteoclast-related diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of Aβ on RANKL-induced osteoclast signaling pathways in vitro. In mouse bone marrow monocytes (BMMs), Aβ exerted no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis but promoted osteoclastic bone resorption. In molecular levels, Aβ enhanced NF-κB activity and IκB-α degradation, activated ERK phosphorylation and stimulated calcium oscillation, thus leading to upregulation of NFAT-c1 expression during osteoclast activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Aβ enhances RANKL-induced osteoclast activation through IκB-α degradation, ERK phosphorylation, and calcium oscillation signaling pathways and that Aβ may be a promising agent in the treatment of osteoclast-related disease such as osteoporosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Article
Phenotype-Genotype Association Analysis of ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma and Its Molecular Link to Patient Osteoporosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(10), 1654; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17101654 - 29 Sep 2016
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3079
Abstract
Adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma, also known as Cushing disease (CD), is rare and causes metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis due to hypercortisolism. However, the molecular pathogenesis of CD is still unclear because of a lack of human cell lines and animal models. [...] Read more.
Adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma, also known as Cushing disease (CD), is rare and causes metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis due to hypercortisolism. However, the molecular pathogenesis of CD is still unclear because of a lack of human cell lines and animal models. Here, we study 106 clinical characteristics and gene expression changes from 118 patients, the largest cohort of CD in a single-center. RNA deep sequencing is used to examine genotypic changes in nine paired female ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas and adjacent nontumorous pituitary tissues (ANPT). We develop a novel analysis linking disease clinical characteristics and whole transcriptomic changes, using Pearson Correlation Coefficient to discover a molecular network mechanism. We report that osteoporosis is distinguished from the phenotype and genotype analysis. A cluster of genes involved in osteoporosis is identified using Pearson correlation coefficient analysis. Most of the genes are reported in the bone related literature, confirming the feasibility of phenotype-genotype association analysis, which could be used in the analysis of almost all diseases. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1), collagen type I α 1 chain (COL1A1), 5′-nucleotidase ecto (NT5E), HtrA serine peptidase 1 (HTRA1) and angiopoietin 1 (ANGPT1) and their signalling pathways are shown to be involved in osteoporosis in CD patients. Our discoveries provide a molecular link for osteoporosis in CD patients, and may open new potential avenues for osteoporosis intervention and treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Development of Bone Targeting Drugs
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(7), 1345; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18071345 - 23 Jun 2017
Cited by 42 | Viewed by 3728
Abstract
The skeletal system, comprising bones, ligaments, cartilage and their connective tissues, is critical for the structure and support of the body. Diseases that affect the skeletal system can be difficult to treat, mainly because of the avascular cartilage region. Targeting drugs to the [...] Read more.
The skeletal system, comprising bones, ligaments, cartilage and their connective tissues, is critical for the structure and support of the body. Diseases that affect the skeletal system can be difficult to treat, mainly because of the avascular cartilage region. Targeting drugs to the site of action can not only increase efficacy but also reduce toxicity. Bone-targeting drugs are designed with either of two general targeting moieties, aimed at the entire skeletal system or a specific cell type. Most bone-targeting drugs utilize an affinity to hydroxyapatite, a major component of the bone matrix that includes a high concentration of positively-charged Ca2+. The strategies for designing such targeting moieties can involve synthetic and/or biological components including negatively-charged amino acid peptides or bisphosphonates. Efficient delivery of bone-specific drugs provides significant impact in the treatment of skeletal related disorders including infectious diseases (osteoarthritis, osteomyelitis, etc.), osteoporosis, and metabolic skeletal dysplasia. Despite recent advances, however, both delivering the drug to its target without losing activity and avoiding adverse local effects remain a challenge. In this review, we investigate the current development of bone-targeting moieties, their efficacy and limitations, and discuss future directions for the development of these specific targeted treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Review
Osteoblast Role in Rheumatic Diseases
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(6), 1272; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18061272 - 15 Jun 2017
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 2338
Abstract
Alterations in osteoblast growth, differentiation and activity play a role in the pathogenesis of several rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritides, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis. In fact, in these rheumatic diseases, abnormal activity of Wnt signaling, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK)-RANK ligand [...] Read more.
Alterations in osteoblast growth, differentiation and activity play a role in the pathogenesis of several rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritides, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis. In fact, in these rheumatic diseases, abnormal activity of Wnt signaling, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK)-RANK ligand (RANKL)-osteoprotegerin (OPG) signaling, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) pathway and other mechanisms have been described in osteoblasts. This review article is focused on current knowledge on the role of osteoblast dysregulation occurring in rheumatic diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Review
The Roles of Long Non-Protein-Coding RNAs in Osteo-Adipogenic Lineage Commitment
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(6), 1236; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18061236 - 09 Jun 2017
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 2409
Abstract
Osteoblasts and adipocytes share a common mesenchymal progenitor in the bone marrow. This implies that a reciprocal relationship exists between osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Further, cells of osteoblast lineage transdifferentiate into adipocytes under some circumstances. Dysregulation of osteo-adipogenic fate-determination leads to bone diseases [...] Read more.
Osteoblasts and adipocytes share a common mesenchymal progenitor in the bone marrow. This implies that a reciprocal relationship exists between osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Further, cells of osteoblast lineage transdifferentiate into adipocytes under some circumstances. Dysregulation of osteo-adipogenic fate-determination leads to bone diseases such as osteoporosis, accompanied by an increase in bone marrow adipose tissue. Thus, the fine-tuning of osteo-adipogenesis is necessary for bone homeostasis. Osteo-adipogenic progression is governed by a complex crosstalk of extrinsic signals, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Long non-protein-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) act in part as epigenetic regulators in a broad range of biological activities, such as chromatin organization, transcriptional regulation, post-translational modifications, and histone modification. In this review, we highlight the roles of epigenetic regulators, particularly lncRNAs, in the osteo-adipogenic lineage commitment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and the adipogenic transdifferentiation of osteoblasts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Review
Trauma and Stem Cells: Biology and Potential Therapeutic Implications
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(3), 577; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18030577 - 07 Mar 2017
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3255
Abstract
Trauma may cause irreversible tissue damage and loss of function despite current best practice. Healing is dependent both on the nature of the injury and the intrinsic biological capacity of those tissues for healing. Preclinical research has highlighted stem cell therapy as a [...] Read more.
Trauma may cause irreversible tissue damage and loss of function despite current best practice. Healing is dependent both on the nature of the injury and the intrinsic biological capacity of those tissues for healing. Preclinical research has highlighted stem cell therapy as a potential avenue for improving outcomes for injuries with poor healing capacity. Additionally, trauma activates the immune system and alters stem cell behaviour. This paper reviews the current literature on stem cells and its relevance to trauma care. Emphasis is placed on understanding how stem cells respond to trauma and pertinent mechanisms that can be utilised to promote tissue healing. Research involving notable difficulties in trauma care such as fracture non-union, cartilage damage and trauma induced inflammation is discussed further. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Review
Gene Expression in Osteolysis: Review on the Identification of Altered Molecular Pathways in Preclinical and Clinical Studies
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(3), 499; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18030499 - 25 Feb 2017
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 2037
Abstract
Aseptic loosening (AL) due to osteolysis is the primary cause of joint prosthesis failure. Currently, a second surgery is still the only available treatment for AL, with its associated drawbacks. The present review aims at identifying genes whose expression is altered in osteolysis, [...] Read more.
Aseptic loosening (AL) due to osteolysis is the primary cause of joint prosthesis failure. Currently, a second surgery is still the only available treatment for AL, with its associated drawbacks. The present review aims at identifying genes whose expression is altered in osteolysis, and that could be the target of new pharmacological treatments, with the goal of replacing surgery. This review also aims at identifying the molecular pathways altered by different wear particles. We reviewed preclinical and clinical studies from 2010 to 2016, analyzing gene expression of tissues or cells affected by osteolysis. A total of 32 in vitro, 16 in vivo and six clinical studies were included. These studies revealed that genes belonging to both inflammation and osteoclastogenesis pathways are mainly involved in osteolysis. More precisely, an increase in genes encoding for the following factors were observed: Interleukins 6 and 1β (IL16 and β), Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), Nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATC1), Cathepsin K (CATK) and Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). Titanium (Ti) and Polyethylene (PE) were the most studied particles, showing that Ti up-regulated inflammation and osteoclastogenesis related genes, while PE up-regulated primarily osteoclastogenesis related genes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Review
Osteogenic Differentiation in Healthy and Pathological Conditions
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(1), 41; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18010041 - 27 Dec 2016
Cited by 58 | Viewed by 4358
Abstract
This review focuses on the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), bone formation and turn-over in good and ill skeletal fates. The interacting molecular pathways which control bone remodeling in physiological conditions during a lifelong process are described. Then, alterations of the [...] Read more.
This review focuses on the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), bone formation and turn-over in good and ill skeletal fates. The interacting molecular pathways which control bone remodeling in physiological conditions during a lifelong process are described. Then, alterations of the molecular pathways regulating osteogenesis are addressed. In the aging process, as well as in glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, bone loss is caused not only by an unbalanced bone resorption activity, but also by an impairment of MSCs’ commitment towards the osteogenic lineage, in favour of adipogenesis. Mutations affecting the expression of key genes involved in the control of bone development occur in several heritable bone disorders. A few examples are described in order to illustrate the pathological consequences of perturbation in different steps of osteogenic commitment, osteoblast maturation, and matrix mineralization, respectively. The involvement of abnormal MSC differentiation in cancer is then discussed. Finally, a brief overview of clinical applications of MSCs in bone regeneration and repair is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Review
A Possible Role of Intestinal Microbiota in the Pathogenesis of Ankylosing Spondylitis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(12), 2126; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17122126 - 17 Dec 2016
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 6366
Abstract
Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease primarily affecting the sacroiliac joints and the spine, for which the pathogenesis is thought to be a result of the combination of host genetic factors and environmental triggers. However, the precise factors that determine one’s [...] Read more.
Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease primarily affecting the sacroiliac joints and the spine, for which the pathogenesis is thought to be a result of the combination of host genetic factors and environmental triggers. However, the precise factors that determine one’s susceptibility to AS remain to be unraveled. With 100 trillion bacteria residing in the mammalian gut having established a symbiotic relation with their host influencing many aspects of host metabolism, physiology, and immunity, a growing body of evidence suggests that intestinal microbiota may play an important role in AS. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain the potential role of the microbiome in the etiology of AS, such as alterations of intestinal permeability, stimulation of immune responses, and molecular mimicry. In this review, the existing evidence for the involvement of the microbiome in AS pathogenesis was discussed and the potential of intestinal microbiome-targeting strategies in the prevention and treatment of AS was evaluated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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Review
Role of Osteogenic Growth Peptide (OGP) and OGP(10–14) in Bone Regeneration: A Review
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1885; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17111885 - 22 Nov 2016
Cited by 32 | Viewed by 3385
Abstract
Bone regeneration is a process that involves several molecular mediators, such as growth factors, which directly affect the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone-related cells. The osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) and its C-terminal pentapeptide OGP(10–14) have been shown to stimulate the proliferation, differentiation, [...] Read more.
Bone regeneration is a process that involves several molecular mediators, such as growth factors, which directly affect the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone-related cells. The osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) and its C-terminal pentapeptide OGP(10–14) have been shown to stimulate the proliferation, differentiation, alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix mineralization of osteoblastic lineage cells. However, the exact molecular mechanisms that promote osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation are not completely understood. This review presents the main chemical characteristics of OGP and/or OGP(10–14), and also discusses the potential molecular pathways induced by these growth factors to promote proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Furthermore, since these peptides have been extensively investigated for bone tissue engineering, the clinical applications of these peptides for bone regeneration are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bone and Cartilage Research)
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