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Special Issue "Unravelling the Mysteries of Cytomegalovirus"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Patricia Price
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
Interests: CMV; NK cells; HCV; HIV; non tuberculous mycobacteria

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Most of us are CMV seropositive and have been so all our lives, but investigations of its impact have generated more questions than answers. Here are a few:

  • CMV induces novel populations of NK and gdT cells. What do these cells do?
  • CMV DNA is rarely detectable in the blood of healthy older people who have up to a third of their T-cells specific for its antigens. How does this happen and is it good for us?
  • CMV encodes homologues of human immune-related genes. These are not needed for viral replication so what do they do?
  • CMV causes pneumonitis in transplant recipients, retinitis in AIDS patients, and brain damage in babies – is it the same virus or is the host response different?
  • CMV replicates in the salivary gland and is shed in saliva, so how do some people remain seronegative? Have they never shared a spoon?

If you think you can answer one or more of these questions (or any others), then you may like to contribute to this Special Issue.

Assoc. Prof. Patricia Price
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cytomegalovirus
  • CMV
  • saliva
  • diversity
  • endothelium
  • homologues of immune-related genes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Review
A Review of Murine Cytomegalovirus as a Model for Human Cytomegalovirus Disease—Do Mice Lie?
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(1), 214; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22010214 - 28 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 894
Abstract
Since murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) was first described in 1954, it has been used to model human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) diseases. MCMV is a natural pathogen of mice that is present in wild mice populations and has been associated with diseases such as myocarditis. The [...] Read more.
Since murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) was first described in 1954, it has been used to model human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) diseases. MCMV is a natural pathogen of mice that is present in wild mice populations and has been associated with diseases such as myocarditis. The species-specific nature of HCMV restricts most research to cell culture-based studies or to the investigation of non-invasive clinical samples, which may not be ideal for the study of disseminated disease. Initial MCMV research used a salivary gland-propagated virus administered via different routes of inoculation into a variety of mouse strains. This revealed that the genetic background of the laboratory mice affected the severity of disease and altered the extent of subsequent pathology. The advent of genetically modified mice and viruses has allowed new aspects of disease to be modeled and the opportunistic nature of HCMV infection to be confirmed. This review describes the different ways that MCMV has been used to model HCMV diseases and explores the continuing difficulty faced by researchers attempting to model HCMV congenital cytomegalovirus disease using the mouse model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Unravelling the Mysteries of Cytomegalovirus)
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Review
Deciphering the Immunological Phenomenon of Adaptive Natural Killer (NK) Cells and Cytomegalovirus (CMV)
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(22), 8864; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21228864 - 23 Nov 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 926
Abstract
Natural killer (NK) cells play a significant and vital role in the first line of defense against infection through their ability to target cells without prior sensitization. They also contribute significantly to the activation and recruitment of both innate and adaptive immune cells [...] Read more.
Natural killer (NK) cells play a significant and vital role in the first line of defense against infection through their ability to target cells without prior sensitization. They also contribute significantly to the activation and recruitment of both innate and adaptive immune cells through the production of a range of cytokines and chemokines. In the context of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, NK cells and CMV have co-evolved side by side to employ several mechanisms to evade one another. However, during this co-evolution the discovery of a subset of long-lived NK cells with enhanced effector potential, increased antibody-dependent responses and the potential to mediate immune memory has revolutionized the field of NK cell biology. The ability of a virus to imprint on the NK cell receptor repertoire resulting in the expansion of diverse, highly functional NK cells to this day remains a significant immunological phenomenon that only occurs in the context of CMV. Here we review our current understanding of the development of these NK cells, commonly referred to as adaptive NK cells and their current role in transplantation, infection, vaccination and cancer immunotherapy to decipher the complex role of CMV in dictating NK cell functional fate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Unravelling the Mysteries of Cytomegalovirus)
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