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Special Issue "Health Benefits of Resveratrol 3.0"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Giulia Malaguarnera
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Center “The Great Senescence”, University of Catania, 95100 Catania, Italy
Interests: gut microbiota; metabolites; metabolism; Alzheimer’s disease; retina; diabetes; nutrition; pharmacology; gastrointestinal diseases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Resveratrol (RV) is a natural phenol found in red grapes, mulberries, peanuts, wines and tea, and can be extracted from red wine during fermentation of grape skin. The mechanism by which RV exerts favorable effects is related to induction of genes for oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial biogenesis. It has been reported that RV plays a role as an antinflammatory, antioxidant, antiviral, and exerts anticancer activities through many different mechanisms. Patients with higher anxiety traits, depression, and fatigue showed a distinct metabolic profile, indicative of a different energy homeostasis, hormonal metabolism and gut microbial activity. The daily consumption of RV resulted in a significant modification in the microbial metabolism, with potential long-term health consequences. A human intervention study indicated that consumption of RV increased the number of Enterococcus, Prevotella, and Bacterioides uniformis. Several beneficial effects have been observed in human beings, but others studies are mandatory to continue with the scientific research in this field. Indeed, new knowledge concerning the “Health Benefits of Resveratrol” could enable the development of novel functional foods or nutraceuticals, incorporating resveratrol, suitable for preventing or treating diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, obesity, dislipemia, insulin resistance and diabetes, liver diseases, and other disorders.

Dr. Giulia Malaguarnera
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Resveratrol supplementation
  • Resveratrol metabolites
  • Sirtuins
  • Aging
  • Epigenetic
  • Benefits in chronic disease
  • Treatment

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Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Article
Resveratrol Attenuates the Proliferation of Prostatic Stromal Cells in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia by Regulating Cell Cycle Progression, Apoptosis, Signaling Pathways, BPH Markers, and NF-κB Activity
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(11), 5969; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22115969 - 31 May 2021
Viewed by 859
Abstract
Resveratrol can inhibit cell proliferation and metastasis and induce apoptosis. However, the mechanisms of action through which resveratrol inhibits the abnormal proliferation of prostate stromal cells, causing prostatic hyperplasia, have not been fully elucidated. Here, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on [...] Read more.
Resveratrol can inhibit cell proliferation and metastasis and induce apoptosis. However, the mechanisms of action through which resveratrol inhibits the abnormal proliferation of prostate stromal cells, causing prostatic hyperplasia, have not been fully elucidated. Here, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on cell proliferation associated with prostatic hyperplasia using WPMY-1 cells. Our results showed that resveratrol inhibited the proliferation of WPMY-1 cells via the induction of G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest, which was caused by downregulated expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases regulated by increased p21WAF1 and p27KIP1 expression level. In addition, resveratrol treatment suppressed the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. The expression levels of molecular markers affecting prostate development were also reduced by treatment with resveratrol. Finally, resveratrol attenuated the binding activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB in WPMY-1 cells, and accelerated apoptotic cell death via intrinsic cascade pathway. These results indicate that resveratrol may be useful for the prevention or treatment of prostatic hyperplasia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Benefits of Resveratrol 3.0)
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Article
Resveratrol Butyrate Esters Inhibit BPA-Induced Liver Damage in Male Offspring Rats by Modulating Antioxidant Capacity and Gut Microbiota
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(10), 5273; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22105273 - 17 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 688
Abstract
Resveratrol can affect the physiology or biochemistry of offspring in the maternal–fetal animal model. However, it exhibits low bioavailability in humans and animals. Fifteen-week SD pregnant female rats were orally administered bisphenol A (BPA) and/or resveratrol butyrate ester (RBE), and the male offspring [...] Read more.
Resveratrol can affect the physiology or biochemistry of offspring in the maternal–fetal animal model. However, it exhibits low bioavailability in humans and animals. Fifteen-week SD pregnant female rats were orally administered bisphenol A (BPA) and/or resveratrol butyrate ester (RBE), and the male offspring rats (n = 4–8 per group) were evaluated. The results show that RBE treatment (BPA + R30) compared with the BPA group can reduce the damage caused by BPA (p < 0.05). RBE enhanced the expression of selected genes and induced extramedullary hematopoiesis and mononuclear cell infiltration. RBE increased the abundance of S24-7 and Adlercreutzia in the intestines of the male offspring rats, as well as the concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the feces. RBE also increased the antioxidant capacity of the liver by inducing Nrf2, promoting the expression of HO-1, SOD, and CAT. It also increased the concentration of intestinal SCFAs, enhancing the barrier formed by intestinal cells, thereby preventing BPA-induced metabolic disruption in the male offspring rats, and reduced liver inflammation. This study identified a potential mechanism underlying the protective effects of RBE against the liver damage caused by BPA exposure during the peri-pregnancy period, and the influence of the gut microbiota on the gut–liver axis in the offspring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Benefits of Resveratrol 3.0)
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Article
Resveratrol Protects Cardiac Tissue in Experimental Malignant Hypertension Due to Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Anti-Apoptotic Properties
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(9), 5006; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22095006 - 08 May 2021
Viewed by 652
Abstract
Hypertension is one of the most prevalent and powerful contributors of cardiovascular diseases. Malignant hypertension is a relatively rare but extremely severe form of hypertension accompanied with heart, brain, and renal impairment. Resveratrol, a recently described grape-derived, polyphenolic antioxidant molecule, has been proposed [...] Read more.
Hypertension is one of the most prevalent and powerful contributors of cardiovascular diseases. Malignant hypertension is a relatively rare but extremely severe form of hypertension accompanied with heart, brain, and renal impairment. Resveratrol, a recently described grape-derived, polyphenolic antioxidant molecule, has been proposed as an effective agent in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. This study was designed to examine chronic resveratrol administration on blood pressure, oxidative stress, and inflammation, with special emphasis on cardiac structure and function in two models of experimental hypertension. The experiments were performed in spontaneously (SHRs) and malignantly hypertensive rats (MHRs). The chronic administration of resveratrol significantly decreased blood pressure in both spontaneously and malignant hypertensive animals. The resveratrol treatment ameliorated morphological changes in the heart tissue. The immunohistochemistry of the heart tissue after resveratrol treatment showed that both TGF-β and Bax were not present in the myocytes of SHRs and were present mainly in the myocytes of MHRs. Resveratrol suppressed lipid peroxidation and significantly improved oxidative status and release of NO. These results suggest that resveratrol prevents hypertrophic and apoptotic consequences induced by high blood pressure with more pronounced effects in malignant hypertension. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Benefits of Resveratrol 3.0)
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Review

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Review
The Clinical Significance of Drug–Food Interactions of Direct Oral Anticoagulants
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(16), 8531; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22168531 - 08 Aug 2021
Viewed by 558
Abstract
Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in the world. For almost 60 years, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) were the mainstay of anticoagulation therapy, but in recent years direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have become the anticoagulant treatment of choice. DOACs were [...] Read more.
Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in the world. For almost 60 years, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) were the mainstay of anticoagulation therapy, but in recent years direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have become the anticoagulant treatment of choice. DOACs were initially considered drugs with no significant food interactions; however, clinical observations from daily practice have proved otherwise as interactions with food ingredients have been reported. Food, dietary supplements or herbs may contain substances that, when administered concomitantly with DOACs, can potentially affect the plasma concentration of the drugs. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the clinical significance of drug–food interactions of DOACs, such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban and betrixaban. Patients treated with anticoagulants should avoid products containing St. John’s wort and take special care with other food ingredients. As the interest in dietary supplements is on the rise, healthcare providers can contribute to the development of well-designed clinical trials on interactions between DOACs and food, and distribute sufficient knowledge about the proper use of these supplements among patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Benefits of Resveratrol 3.0)
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Review
Effects of Maternal Resveratrol Intake on the Metabolic Health of the Offspring
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(9), 4792; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22094792 - 30 Apr 2021
Viewed by 656
Abstract
Maternal nutritional imbalances, in addition to maternal overweight and obesity, can result in long-term effects on the metabolic health of the offspring, increasing the risk of common non-communicable disorders such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This increased disease risk may also be [...] Read more.
Maternal nutritional imbalances, in addition to maternal overweight and obesity, can result in long-term effects on the metabolic health of the offspring, increasing the risk of common non-communicable disorders such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This increased disease risk may also be transmitted across generations. Unfortunately, lifestyle interventions have shown reduced compliancy and limited efficacy. Resveratrol is a natural polyphenolic compound reported to have pleiotropic beneficial actions including a possible protective effect against the metabolic programming induced by poor dietary habits during development. However, studies to date are inconclusive regarding the potential metabolic benefits of maternal resveratrol supplementation during pregnancy and lactation on the offspring. Moreover, the responses to metabolic challenges are suggested to be different in males and females, suggesting that the effectiveness of treatment strategies may also differ, but many studies have been performed only in males. Here we review the current evidence, both in humans and animal models, regarding the possible beneficial effects of maternal resveratrol intake on the metabolic health of the offspring and highlight the different effects of resveratrol depending on the maternal diet, as well as the differential responses of males and females. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Benefits of Resveratrol 3.0)
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Review
Resveratrol, Metabolic Dysregulation, and Alzheimer’s Disease: Considerations for Neurogenerative Disease
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(9), 4628; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22094628 - 28 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1100
Abstract
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has traditionally been discussed as a disease where serious cognitive decline is a result of Aβ-plaque accumulation, tau tangle formation, and neurodegeneration. Recently, it has been shown that metabolic dysregulation observed with insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes actively [...] Read more.
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has traditionally been discussed as a disease where serious cognitive decline is a result of Aβ-plaque accumulation, tau tangle formation, and neurodegeneration. Recently, it has been shown that metabolic dysregulation observed with insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes actively contributes to the progression of AD. One of the pathologies linking metabolic disease to AD is the release of inflammatory cytokines that contribute to the development of brain neuroinflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction, ultimately resulting in amyloid-beta peptide production and accumulation. Improving these metabolic impairments has been shown to be effective at reducing AD progression and improving cognitive function. The polyphenol resveratrol (RSV) improves peripheral metabolic disorders and may provide similar benefits centrally in the brain. RSV reduces inflammatory cytokine release, improves mitochondrial energetic function, and improves Aβ-peptide clearance by activating SIRT1 and AMPK. RSV has also been linked to improved cognitive function; however, the mechanisms of action are less defined. However, there is evidence to suggest that chronic RSV-driven AMPK activation may be detrimental to synaptic function and growth, which would directly impact cognition. This review will discuss the benefits and adverse effects of RSV on the brain, highlighting the major signaling pathways and some of the gaps surrounding the use of RSV as a treatment for AD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Benefits of Resveratrol 3.0)
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Review
Preventive Aspects of Early Resveratrol Supplementation in Cardiovascular and Kidney Disease of Developmental Origins
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(8), 4210; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22084210 - 19 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 542
Abstract
The increase in the incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and kidney disease has stimulated research for strategies that could prevent, rather than just treat, both interconnected disorders. Resveratrol, a polyphenolic compound with pleiotropic biofunctions, has shown health benefits. Emerging epidemiological data supports that [...] Read more.
The increase in the incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and kidney disease has stimulated research for strategies that could prevent, rather than just treat, both interconnected disorders. Resveratrol, a polyphenolic compound with pleiotropic biofunctions, has shown health benefits. Emerging epidemiological data supports that early life environmental insults are regarded as increased risks of developing CVDs and kidney disease in adulthood. Conversely, both disorders could be reversed or postponed by shifting interventions from adulthood to earlier stage by so-called reprogramming. The purpose of this review is first to highlight current epidemiological studies linking cardiovascular and renal programming to resulting CVD and kidney disease of developmental origins. This will be followed by a summary of how resveratrol could exert a positive influence on CVDs and kidney disease. This review also presents an overview of the evidence documenting resveratrol as a reprogramming agent to protect against CVD and kidney disease of developmental origins from animal studies and to outline the advances in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms. Overall, this review reveals the need for future research to further clarify the reprogramming effects of resveratrol before clinical translation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Benefits of Resveratrol 3.0)
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