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Special Issue "Molecular Mechanisms of Immunothrombosis, Autoimmunity, and Development of Next Generation Anticoagulants"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Nicola Pozzi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Edward. A Doisy Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
Interests: structure-function of clotting and complement factors; structure-function of thiol-oxidoreductases; single-molecule FRET; coagulation; autoimmunity; antiphospholipid syndrome; thrombosis; innate immunity; protein engineering; protein-protein interactions; protein-small molecule interactions; allosteric regulation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Immunothrombosis is a physiological process initiated by the innate immune system that links coagulation to the recognition, containment, and destruction of microbial pathogens. While protective during microbial infections, a growing body of evidence supports a model whereby its dysregulation exacerbates the severity of multiple diseases, such as sepsis, cancer, and autoimmunity, thus representing a potential target for pharmacological intervention.

In this Special Issue, the focus will be on the molecular mechanisms linking immunothrombosis to the onset and development of human pathology, and strategies for achieving safe anticoagulation by down regulating the activation of the innate immune system and modulating of the initiation and propagation of the clotting cascade. One relevant example of disease in which immunothtombosis plays an important role is the systemic autoimmune disorder Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS), in which antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) targeting phospholipids and phospholipid-binding proteins are responsible for vascular thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity. Another one is Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), in which SARS-CoV-2 infection leads to coagulopathy. Experimental papers and original reviews which provide new structural and functional insights into how complement and clotting factors dynamically interact with the microenvironment, how they bind and assemble onto phospholipid bilayers and negatively charged surfaces, how they are activated, regulated and cleared from the circulation, and how they interact with cell receptors, autoantibodies and viruses are welcome. Articles describing new molecular pathways through which complement and coagulation cascades crosstalk as well as new pharmacological and genetic strategies for preventing thrombosis in the context of upregulated immunothrombosis are also welcome.

Dr. Nicola Pozzi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Innate immunity
  • Complement cascade
  • Coagulation cascade
  • Autoimmunity
  • Thrombosis
  • Structural biology
  • Structure-function relationships
  • Anticoagulants
  • Enzymology
  • Drug discovery
  • Immuothrombosis
  • Sepsis
  • Cancer
  • Antiphospholipid Syndrome
  • COVID-19

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
The Role of P-Selectin in COVID-19 Coagulopathy: An Updated Review
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(15), 7942; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22157942 - 26 Jul 2021
Viewed by 495
Abstract
In severe COVID-19, which is characterized by blood clots and neutrophil-platelet aggregates in the circulating blood and different tissues, an increased incidence of cardiovascular complications and venous thrombotic events has been reported. The inflammatory storm that characterizes severe infections may act as a [...] Read more.
In severe COVID-19, which is characterized by blood clots and neutrophil-platelet aggregates in the circulating blood and different tissues, an increased incidence of cardiovascular complications and venous thrombotic events has been reported. The inflammatory storm that characterizes severe infections may act as a driver capable of profoundly disrupting the complex interplay between platelets, endothelium, and leukocytes, thus contributing to the definition of COVID-19-associated coagulopathy. In this frame, P-selectin represents a key molecule expressed on endothelial cells and on activated platelets, and contributes to endothelial activation, leucocyte recruitment, rolling, and tissue migration. Briefly, we describe the current state of knowledge about P-selectin involvement in COVID-19 pathogenesis, its possible use as a severity marker and as a target for host-directed therapeutic intervention. Full article
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