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Special Issue "Recent Advances in Molecular Research of Metabolic Disorders"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Maria S. Fernandez-Alfonso
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto Pluridisciplinar and Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad ComplutenseMadrid, Spain
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Marta Gil-Ortega
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, San Pablo CEU University, Ctra. Boadilla del Monte Km5.300, 28925-Alcorcón, Spain
Interests: Obesity; blood pressure
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, metabolic disorders are considered to be a major health problem affecting a huge percentage of the population worldwide. They are associated with chronic diseases like obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, or cardiovascular alterations, among others, as well as with a higher incidence of all-cause mortality.

For the last few years, a large number of studies have deepened and progressed our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the development of metabolic disorders. In this regard, special attention has been focused on oxidative stress, inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, alterations on glucose and/or lipid metabolism, insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, etc. Nevertheless, further studies are required in order to identify new potential mechanisms implicated in the development of these alterations and/or potential targets (i.e., new adipokines, signaling molecules, exosomes, epigenetic reprogramming, biomarkers, etc.) that could help to develop new strategies and drugs aimed at preventing and/or reversing the complications associated with metabolic disorders.

This Special Issue aims to review current advances in the field of metabolic disorders associated with obesity, diabetes, and non-alcoholic fatty liver and cardiovascular disease, with the purpose of better understanding the pathways involved in these alterations. Contributions to both animal models and/or humans are encouraged so as to shed light on the development of new therapeutic approaches to improve the clinical management of the cardiometabolic complications derived from metabolic disorders.

Prof. Dr. Maria S. Fernandez-Alfonso
Prof. Dr. Marta Gil-Ortega
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • obesity
  • diabetes
  • insulin resistance
  • oxidative stress
  • inflammation
  • non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • cardiovascular alterations
  • endoplasmic reticulum stress
  • lipids
  • glucose
  • adipokines
  • exosomes
  • epigenetics
  • biomarkers

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Chronic Inflammation in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(8), 3923; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22083923 - 10 Apr 2021
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Abstract
Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine–metabolic disorder affecting a vast population worldwide; it is linked with anovulation, mitochondrial dysfunctions and hormonal disbalance. Mutations in mtDNA have been identified in PCOS patients and likely play an important role in PCOS aetiology [...] Read more.
Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine–metabolic disorder affecting a vast population worldwide; it is linked with anovulation, mitochondrial dysfunctions and hormonal disbalance. Mutations in mtDNA have been identified in PCOS patients and likely play an important role in PCOS aetiology and pathogenesis; however, their causative role in PCOS development requires further investigation. As a low-grade chronic inflammation disease, PCOS patients have permanently elevated levels of inflammatory markers (TNF-α, CRP, IL-6, IL-8, IL-18). In this review, we summarise recent data regarding the role of mtDNA mutations and mitochondrial malfunctions in PCOS pathogenesis. Furthermore, we discuss recent papers dedicated to the identification of novel biomarkers for early PCOS diagnosis. Finally, traditional and new mitochondria-targeted treatments are discussed. This review intends to emphasise the key role of oxidative stress and chronic inflammation in PCOS pathogenesis; however, the exact molecular mechanism is mostly unknown and requires further investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Molecular Research of Metabolic Disorders)
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Open AccessReview
NLRP3 Inflammasome: Potential Role in Obesity Related Low-Grade Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(6), 3254; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22063254 - 23 Mar 2021
Viewed by 522
Abstract
Among multiple mechanisms, low-grade inflammation is critical for the development of insulin resistance as a feature of type 2 diabetes. The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family (NOD-like) pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome has been linked to the development of insulin resistance in [...] Read more.
Among multiple mechanisms, low-grade inflammation is critical for the development of insulin resistance as a feature of type 2 diabetes. The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family (NOD-like) pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome has been linked to the development of insulin resistance in various tissues; however, its role in the development of insulin resistance in the skeletal muscle has not been explored in depth. Currently, there is limited evidence that supports the pathological role of NLRP3 inflammasome activation in glucose handling in the skeletal muscle of obese individuals. Here, we have centered our focus on insulin signaling in skeletal muscle, which is the main site of postprandial glucose disposal in humans. We discuss the current evidence showing that the NLRP3 inflammasome disturbs glucose homeostasis. We also review how NLRP3-associated interleukin and its gasdermin D-mediated efflux could affect insulin-dependent intracellular pathways. Finally, we address pharmacological NLRP3 inhibitors that may have a therapeutical use in obesity-related metabolic alterations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Molecular Research of Metabolic Disorders)
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Open AccessReview
Mushroom-Derived Medicine? Preclinical Studies Suggest Potential Benefits of Ergothioneine for Cardiometabolic Health
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(6), 3246; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22063246 - 23 Mar 2021
Viewed by 700
Abstract
Medicinal use of mushrooms has been documented since ancient times, and in the modern world, mushrooms have a longstanding history of use in Eastern medicine. Recent interest in plant-based diets in Westernized countries has brought increasing attention to the use of mushrooms and [...] Read more.
Medicinal use of mushrooms has been documented since ancient times, and in the modern world, mushrooms have a longstanding history of use in Eastern medicine. Recent interest in plant-based diets in Westernized countries has brought increasing attention to the use of mushrooms and mushroom-derived compounds in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. Edible mushrooms are the most abundant food sources of the modified amino acid, ergothioneine. This compound has been shown to accumulate in almost all cells and tissues, but preferentially in those exposed to oxidative stress and injury. The demonstrated cytoprotectant effect of ergothioneine has led many to suggest a potential therapeutic role for this compound in chronic conditions that involve ongoing oxidative stress and inflammation, including cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. However, the in vivo effects of ergothioneine and its underlying therapeutic mechanisms in the whole organism are not as clear. Moreover, there are no well-defined, clinical prevention and intervention trials of ergothioneine in chronic disease. This review highlights the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of ergothioneine and its potential as a Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicine for the promotion of cardiometabolic health and the management of the most common manifestations of cardiometabolic disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Molecular Research of Metabolic Disorders)
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