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Special Issue "Recent Advances and Future Perspective in Microbiota and Probiotics"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Andreas Schwiertz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Microecology, 35745 Herborn, Germany
Interests: microbiota; probiotics; sequencing; metabolomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A number of diseases are associated with alterations in the composition of the microbiota of various niches of higher organisms. Although, in most cases, it is unclear if these alterations are the cause or the consequence of disease, they provide a rationale for therapeutic or prophylactic manipulation of a dysbiotic microbiota. Approaches to manipulate the microbiome often include administration of live bacteria, so-called probiotics.

Probiotics are generally defined as live microorganisms that upon use in specific and sufficient numbers confer health benefits to the host. Recognition of the beneficial effects of some bacteria has encouraged the development of probiotics as treatment for disease. There are several bacterial strains or products, which have a long tradition of use and a somehow interesting history.

In this Special Issue, we want to create a platform for high-quality publications on the various aspects of the history, application, and especially molecular interactions of probiotics in plants, animals, and humans.

Prof. Dr. Andreas Schwiertz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Microbiota
  • History of probiotics
  • Plant probiotics
  • Animal probiotics
  • Human probiotics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Production of a Potentially Probiotic Product for Animal Feed and Evaluation of Some of Its Probiotic Properties
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(18), 10004; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms221810004 - 16 Sep 2021
Viewed by 364
Abstract
Nowadays, probiotics have been proposed for substituting antibiotics in animal feed since the European Union banned the latter compounds in 2006 to avoid serious side effects on human health. Therefore, this work aimed to produce a probiotic product for use in animal feed [...] Read more.
Nowadays, probiotics have been proposed for substituting antibiotics in animal feed since the European Union banned the latter compounds in 2006 to avoid serious side effects on human health. Therefore, this work aimed to produce a probiotic product for use in animal feed by fed-batch fermentation of whey with a combination of kefir grains, AGK1, and the fermented whole milk used to activate these kefir grains. The probiotic culture obtained was characterized by high levels of biomass (8.03 g/L), total viability (3.6 × 108 CFU/mL) and antibacterial activity (28.26 Activity Units/mL). Some probiotic properties of the probiotic culture were investigated in vitro, including its survival at low pH values, under simulated gastrointestinal conditions, after freezing in skim milk at −20 °C, and in the commercial feed during storage at room temperature. The viable cells of lactic and acetic acid bacteria and yeasts exhibited higher tolerance to acidic pH and simulated gastrointestinal conditions when the cells were protected with skim milk and piglet feed, compared with washed cells. The results indicated the feasibility of producing a probiotic product at a low cost with a potential application in animal feed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Future Perspective in Microbiota and Probiotics)
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Article
Identification of Potential Probiotics Producing Bacteriocins Active against Listeria monocytogenes by a Combination of Screening Tools
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(16), 8615; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22168615 - 10 Aug 2021
Viewed by 655
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen and a serious concern to food industries. Bacteriocins are antimicrobial peptides produced naturally by a wide range of bacteria mostly belonging to the group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which also comprises many strains used as [...] Read more.
Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen and a serious concern to food industries. Bacteriocins are antimicrobial peptides produced naturally by a wide range of bacteria mostly belonging to the group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which also comprises many strains used as starter cultures or probiotic supplements. Consequently, multifunctional strains that produce bacteriocins are an attractive approach to combine a green-label approach for food preservation with an important probiotic trait. Here, a collection of bacterial isolates from raw cow’s milk was typed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and MALDI-Biotyping and supernatants were screened for the production of antimicrobial compounds. Screening was performed with live Listeria monocytogenes biosensors using a growth-dependent assay and pHluorin, a pH-dependent protein reporting membrane damage. Purification by cation exchange chromatography and further investigation of the active compounds in supernatants of two isolates belonging to the species Pediococcus acidilactici and Lactococcus garvieae suggest that their antimicrobial activity is related to heat-stable proteins/peptides that presumably belong to the class IIa bacteriocins. In conclusion, we present a pipeline of methods for high-throughput screening of strain libraries for potential starter cultures and probiotics producing antimicrobial compounds and their identification and analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Future Perspective in Microbiota and Probiotics)
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Review

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Review
Interactions between the Gut Microbiome, Lung Conditions, and Coronary Heart Disease and How Probiotics Affect These
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(18), 9700; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22189700 - 08 Sep 2021
Viewed by 514
Abstract
The importance of a healthy microbiome cannot be overemphasized. Disturbances in its composition can lead to a variety of symptoms that can extend to other organs. Likewise, acute or chronic conditions in other organs can affect the composition and physiology of the gut [...] Read more.
The importance of a healthy microbiome cannot be overemphasized. Disturbances in its composition can lead to a variety of symptoms that can extend to other organs. Likewise, acute or chronic conditions in other organs can affect the composition and physiology of the gut microbiome. Here, we discuss interorgan communication along the gut–lung axis, as well as interactions between lung and coronary heart diseases and between cardiovascular disease and the gut microbiome. This triangle of organs, which also affects the clinical outcome of COVID-19 infections, is connected by means of numerous receptors and effectors, including immune cells and immune-modulating factors such as short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and trimethlamine–N–oxide (TMAO). The gut microbiome plays an important role in each of these, thus affecting the health of the lungs and the heart, and this interplay occurs in both directions. The gut microbiome can be influenced by the oral uptake of probiotics. With an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for interorgan communication, we can start to define what requirements an ‘ideal’ probiotic should have and its role in this triangle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Future Perspective in Microbiota and Probiotics)
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Review
The Impact of Probiotics on Intestinal Mucositis during Chemotherapy for Colorectal Cancer: A Comprehensive Review of Animal Studies
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(17), 9347; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22179347 - 28 Aug 2021
Viewed by 487
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in females (incidence 16.4/10,000) and the third in males (incidence 23.4/10,000) worldwide. Surgery, chemotherapy (CTx), radiation therapy (RTx), or a combined treatment of those are the current treatment modalities for primary CRC. Chemotherapeutic [...] Read more.
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in females (incidence 16.4/10,000) and the third in males (incidence 23.4/10,000) worldwide. Surgery, chemotherapy (CTx), radiation therapy (RTx), or a combined treatment of those are the current treatment modalities for primary CRC. Chemotherapeutic drug-induced gastrointestinal (GIT) toxicity mainly presents as mucositis and diarrhea. Preclinical studies revealed that probiotic supplementation helps prevent CTx-induced side effects by reducing oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine production and promoting crypt cell proliferation. Moreover, probiotics showed significant results in preventing the loss of body weight (BW) and reducing diarrhea. However, further clinical studies are needed to elucidate the exact doses and most promising combination of strains to reduce or prevent chemotherapy-induced side effects. The aim of this review is to overview currently available literature on the impact of probiotics on CTx-induced side effects in animal studies concerning CRC treatment and discuss the potential mechanisms based on experimental studies’ outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Future Perspective in Microbiota and Probiotics)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Tentative title: Intraspecific diversity of Microbial Anti-inflammatory Molecule (MAM) from Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

Author: Sandrine Auger1, Camille Kropp1, Esther Borras-Nogues1, Wasaporn Chanput1, Gwenaelle Andre-Leroux2, Oscar Gitton-Quent1, Leandro Benevides1 , Natalia Breyner1, Vasco Azevedo3, Philippe Langella1 and Jean-Marc Chatel1.

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