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Special Issue "Molecular Mechanisms of Neural Stem Cells (NSC) Development - Systems Approach"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Neurobiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Michal K. Stachowiak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, Jacobs School of Medicine & Biomedical Science, Department of Biomedical Engineering, State University of New York, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA
Interests: cell biology; stem cells; genomics; development; neuroscience; systems biology
Dr. Anirban Dutta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, Jacobs School of Medicine & Biomedical Science, State University of New York, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA
Interests: neural engineering; systems neuroscience

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Stem cell technologies, including the generation of neural stem cells and 3D brain organoids, have opened an unprecedented path toward understanding neural development, pathologies, and their control at the new global systems levels. This has become feasible in the face of recent developments in systems science, including high-throughput genomics, proteomics, and electro-synaptomics, and nanophotonics engineering.

New studies indicate that intra- and inter-chromosomal DNA interactions determine global genome functions and thereby organismal development. Therefore, understanding the relationship between genome physical structure, function, and development of active neuronal networks, and their multilevel controls, is at the basis of transformative research.

A new generation of nanophotonic optogenomic devices, integrated opto-microelectrode-array hybrid platforms, and atomic force microscopy techniques, open the path toward analyzing, and controlling the development and functions of the 3D neuronal networks. These platforms, fortified by the artificial intelligence of powerful computers, will solve, model, and manipulate the genome and neuronal multi-network systems. This Special Issue will publish current studies and progress in all these areas and lay out a map for future studies that will ultimately lead to an integrated genome-neuronal function model constructed by correlating genomic topology, gene activity networks, protein networks, and the properties of the resultant neuronal networks.

Prof. Michal K. Stachowiak
Dr. Anirban Dutta
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Stem cells 
  • Genome topology 
  • Gene activity networks 
  • Genes for mitochondrial proteins 
  • Cerebral organoids 
  • Neural development 
  • Nanophotonics 
  • Proteomics 
  • Brain surface tension 
  • High-density microelectrode arrays (HDMEA) 
  • 3D neuronal networks 
  • Artificial intelligence

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Global Genome Conformational Programming during Neuronal Development Is Associated with CTCF and Nuclear FGFR1—The Genome Archipelago Model
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(1), 347; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22010347 - 31 Dec 2020
Viewed by 769
Abstract
During the development of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) to neuronal committed cells (NCC), coordinated changes in the expression of 2851 genes take place, mediated by the nuclear form of FGFR1. In this paper, widespread differences are demonstrated in the ESC and NCC [...] Read more.
During the development of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) to neuronal committed cells (NCC), coordinated changes in the expression of 2851 genes take place, mediated by the nuclear form of FGFR1. In this paper, widespread differences are demonstrated in the ESC and NCC inter- and intra-chromosomal interactions, chromatin looping, the formation of CTCF- and nFGFR1-linked Topologically Associating Domains (TADs) on a genome-wide scale and in exemplary HoxA-D loci. The analysis centered on HoxA cluster shows that blocking FGFR1 disrupts the loop formation. FGFR1 binding and genome locales are predictive of the genome interactions; likewise, chromatin interactions along with nFGFR1 binding are predictive of the genome function and correlate with genome regulatory attributes and gene expression. This study advances a topologically integrated genome archipelago model that undergoes structural transformations through the formation of nFGFR1-associated TADs. The makeover of the TAD islands serves to recruit distinct ontogenic programs during the development of the ESC to NCC. Full article
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