ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Nutrigenomics in Liver Diseases: An Uncharted Territory"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Paola Dongiovanni
E-Mail
Guest Editor
1. Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Policlinico, Milan, Italy
2.General Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
Interests: liver diseases; genetics; metabolism; molecular biology; NAFLD; NASH; insulin resistance; genetics; biomarkers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Evidence indicates that metabolic disorders develop as a result of a complex interaction between genetics and environmental factors. Furthermore, epigenetic changes such as DNA-methylation and microRNAs, which regulate the liver transcriptome, concur with environmental factors with regard to liver disease onset. The interface between nutritional environment and cellular/genetic processes is referred to as nutritional genomics or “nutrigenomics”. In recent years, nutrigenomics has contributed to our understanding of how nutrition affects the decline from health to disease by modulating the expression of an individual’s genetic makeup.

Papers submitted to this Special Issue must be focused upon the interaction between genetic background and diet with regard to the development of metabolic diseases and related comorbidities, which deepen the mechanisms through which nutrients and dietary patterns may alter the epigenome. Indeed, individuals vary in their nutrient requirements and responses to diet according to their genetic features, and epigenetic changes can be prevented and manipulated by dietary factors, suggesting that personalized nutrition may represent an important individualistic therapeutic approach to liver diseases and their complications.

Dr. Paola Dongiovanni
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Liver diseases and related pathologies
  • Nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD)
  • Obesity
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Hypertension
  • Intestinal inflammatory diseases
  • Gut liver axis
  • Viral hepatitis
  • Alcoholic liver diseases (ALD)
  • Nutrigenomics
  • Nutriepigenetics
  • miRNAs
  • DNA methylation
  • Genetic factors
  • Gut microbiota
  • Nutrients
  • Lipid and glucose metabolism
  • Personalized medicine

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Review
Nutrients, Genetic Factors, and Their Interaction in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Cardiovascular Disease
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(22), 8761; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21228761 - 19 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1116
Abstract
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries and expose patients to increased risk of hepatic and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Both environmental factors and genetic predisposition contribute to the risk. An inappropriate diet, rich [...] Read more.
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries and expose patients to increased risk of hepatic and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Both environmental factors and genetic predisposition contribute to the risk. An inappropriate diet, rich in refined carbohydrates, especially fructose, and saturated fats, and poor in fibers, polyunsaturated fats, and vitamins is one of the main key factors, as well as the polymorphism of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3 gene) for NAFLD and the apolipoproteins and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family for the cardiovascular damage. Beyond genetic influence, also epigenetics modifications are responsible for various clinical manifestations of both hepatic and CV disease. Interestingly, data are accumulating on the interplay between diet and genetic and epigenetic modifications, modulating pathogenetic pathways in NAFLD and CV disease. We report the main evidence from literature on the influence of both macro and micronutrients in NAFLD and CV damage and the role of genetics either alone or combined with diet in increasing the risk of developing both diseases. Understanding the interaction between metabolic alterations, genetics and diet are essential to treat the diseases and tailoring nutritional therapy to control NAFLD and CV risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics in Liver Diseases: An Uncharted Territory)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Diet, Microbiota and Brain Health: Unraveling the Network Intersecting Metabolism and Neurodegeneration
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(20), 7471; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21207471 - 10 Oct 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1704
Abstract
Increasing evidence gives support for the idea that extra-neuronal factors may affect brain physiology and its predisposition to neurodegenerative diseases. Epidemiological and experimental studies show that nutrition and metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes increase the risk of Alzheimer’s and [...] Read more.
Increasing evidence gives support for the idea that extra-neuronal factors may affect brain physiology and its predisposition to neurodegenerative diseases. Epidemiological and experimental studies show that nutrition and metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes increase the risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases after midlife, while the relationship with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is uncertain, but suggests a protective effect of features of metabolic syndrome. The microbiota has recently emerged as a novel factor engaging strong interactions with neurons and glia, deeply affecting their function and behavior in these diseases. In particular, recent evidence suggested that gut microbes are involved in the seeding of prion-like proteins and their spreading to the central nervous system. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the impact of metabolism, diet and microbiota in neurodegeneration, by affecting simultaneously several aspects of health regarding energy metabolism, immune system and neuronal function. Advancing technologies may allow researchers in the future to improve investigations in these fields, allowing the buildup of population-based preventive interventions and development of targeted therapeutics to halt progressive neurologic disability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics in Liver Diseases: An Uncharted Territory)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
From Environment to Genome and Back: A Lesson from HFE Mutations
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(10), 3505; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21103505 - 15 May 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1563
Abstract
The environment and the human genome are closely entangled and many genetic variations that occur in human populations are the result of adaptive selection to ancestral environmental (mainly dietary) conditions. However, the selected mutations may become maladaptive when environmental conditions change, thus becoming [...] Read more.
The environment and the human genome are closely entangled and many genetic variations that occur in human populations are the result of adaptive selection to ancestral environmental (mainly dietary) conditions. However, the selected mutations may become maladaptive when environmental conditions change, thus becoming candidates for diseases. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a potentially lethal disease leading to iron accumulation mostly due to mutations in the HFE gene. Indeed, homozygosity for the C282Y HFE mutation is associated with the primary iron overload phenotype. However, both penetrance of the C282Y variant and the clinical manifestation of the disease are extremely variable, suggesting that other genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors play a role in the development of HH, as well as, and in its progression to end-stage liver diseases. Alcohol consumption and dietary habits may impact on the phenotypic expression of HFE-related hemochromatosis. Indeed, dietary components and bioactive molecules can affect iron status both directly by modulating its absorption during digestion and indirectly by the epigenetic modification of genes involved in its uptake, storage and recycling. Thus, the premise of this review is to discuss how environmental pressures led to the selection of HFE mutations and whether nutritional and lifestyle interventions may exert beneficial effects on HH outcomes and comorbidities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics in Liver Diseases: An Uncharted Territory)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Nutrients and Porphyria: An Intriguing Crosstalk
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(10), 3462; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21103462 - 14 May 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1758
Abstract
Porphyria refers to a group of fascinating diseases from a metabolic and nutritional standpoint as it provides an example of how metabolic manipulation can be used for therapeutic purposes. It is characterized by defects in heme synthesis, particularly in the erythrocytes and liver. [...] Read more.
Porphyria refers to a group of fascinating diseases from a metabolic and nutritional standpoint as it provides an example of how metabolic manipulation can be used for therapeutic purposes. It is characterized by defects in heme synthesis, particularly in the erythrocytes and liver. Specific enzymes involved in heme biosynthesis directly depend on adequate levels of vitamins and minerals in the tissues. Moreover, micronutrients that are required for producing succinyl CoA and other intermediates in the Krebs (TCA) cycle are indirectly necessary for heme metabolism. This review summarizes articles that describe the nutritional status, supplements intake, and dietary practices of patients affected by porphyria, paying special attention to the therapeutic use of nutrients that may help or hinder this group of diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics in Liver Diseases: An Uncharted Territory)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Nutrition and Genetics in NAFLD: The Perfect Binomium
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(8), 2986; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21082986 - 23 Apr 2020
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3268
Abstract
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a global healthcare burden since it is epidemiologically related to obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). It embraces a wide spectrum of hepatic injuries, which include simple steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, cirrhosis and [...] Read more.
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a global healthcare burden since it is epidemiologically related to obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). It embraces a wide spectrum of hepatic injuries, which include simple steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The susceptibility to develop NAFLD is highly variable and it is influenced by several cues including environmental (i.e., dietary habits and physical activity) and inherited (i.e., genetic/epigenetic) risk factors. Nonetheless, even intestinal microbiota and its by-products play a crucial role in NAFLD pathophysiology. The interaction of dietary exposure with the genome is referred to as ‘nutritional genomics,’ which encompasses both ‘nutrigenetics’ and ‘nutriepigenomics.’ It is focused on revealing the biological mechanisms that entail both the acute and persistent genome-nutrient interactions that influence health and it may represent a promising field of study to improve both clinical and health nutrition practices. Thus, the premise of this review is to discuss the relevance of personalized nutritional advices as a novel therapeutic approach in NAFLD tailored management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics in Liver Diseases: An Uncharted Territory)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop