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Special Issue "The Links between Nutrition, Energy Metabolism, Aging and Cognition"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Fabien Pifferi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UMR CNRS/MNHN 7179 MECADEV, Team BIOADAPT, 1 Avenue du Petit Château, 91800 Brunoy, France
Interests: nutrition; neurophysiology; aging; chronobiology; energy metabolism
Dr. Jérémy Terrien
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UMR CNRS/MNHN 7179 MECADEV, Team BIOADAPT, 1 Avenue du Petit Château, 91800 Brunoy, France
Interests: ecophysiology; neurophysiology; energy metabolism; chronobiology; aging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In modern societies, humans have evolved from physically active hunter-gatherers with a diet rich in fibers but low in sugar to sedentary persons with low physical activity and easy access to extremely rich food. If a modification of diet composition during evolution might have contributed to the expansion of human brain mass and complexity, the recent changes in diet (e.g., more sugar, more fat) might explain in part the increasing prevalence of obesity and associated metabolic disorders. At the same time, medical and social progress has led to an extension of lifespan, but with a rising prevalence of age-related diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases. Studies in humans report that metabolic disorders (such as obesity or insulin resistance) are often comorbidities of cognitive declines and could be considered as risk factors for neurodegenerative diseases.

Gut microbiota, which stand at the interface between the environment and the organism, have also been extensively associated with energy homeostasis and metabolic control, in particular in relation to the effects of microbial metabolites on the gut–brain axis. More precisely, gut microbiota have a major impact on digestive efficiency and on the nutrients that are rendered available for energy homeostasis. It is well described that gut microbiota composition is flexible, in particular, in response to food composition, and, in turn, how the loss of intestinal microbial diversity is detrimental to energy balance and mental health.

This Special Issue will review current advances in the field of energy and metabolic regulations in relation to nutrition, with a specific emphasis on the role of gut microbiota. The focus will be on the effects of nutrition on brain function, and more specifically on the mechanisms that underline the neurodegeneration process. Contributions to both animal models and/or humans, as well as evolutionary perspectives, are encouraged.

Dr. Fabien Pifferi
Dr. Jérémy Terrien
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aging
  • nutrition
  • metabolism
  • energy balance
  • behavior
  • cognition
  • brain
  • neurodegeneration
  • neuroinflammation
  • environment
  • microbiota
  • development
  • season
  • flexibility

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Resveratrol Supplementation Attenuates Cognitive and Molecular Alterations under Maternal High-Fat Diet Intake: Epigenetic Inheritance over Generations
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(3), 1453; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22031453 - 01 Feb 2021
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Abstract
Environmental factors such as maternal high-fat diet (HFD) intake can increase the risk of age-related cognitive decline in adult offspring. Epigenetic mechanisms are a possible link between diet effect and neurodegeneration across generations. Here, we found a significant decrease in triglyceride levels in [...] Read more.
Environmental factors such as maternal high-fat diet (HFD) intake can increase the risk of age-related cognitive decline in adult offspring. Epigenetic mechanisms are a possible link between diet effect and neurodegeneration across generations. Here, we found a significant decrease in triglyceride levels in a high-fat diet with resveratrol (RSV) HFD + RSV group and the offspring. Firstly, we obtained better cognitive performance in HFD+RSV groups and their offspring. Molecularly, a significant increase in DNA methylation (5-mC) levels, as well as increased gene expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) and Dnmt3a in HFD + RSV F1 group, were found. Furthermore, a significant increase of N6-Methyladenosine methylation (m6A) levels in HFD+RSV F1, as well as changes in gene expression of its enzymes Methyltransferase like 3 (Mettl3) and FTO alpha-ketoglutarate dependent dioxygenase (Fto) were found. Moreover, we found a decrease in gene expression levels of pro-inflammatory markers such as Interleukin 1β (Il1-β), Interleukin 6 (Il-6), Tumor necrosis factor-α (Tnf-α), C-X-C motifchemokine ligand 10 (Cxcl-10), the pro-inflammatory factors monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (Mcp-1) and Tumor growth factor-β1 (Tgf-β1) in HFD+RSV and HFD+RSV F1 groups. Moreover, there was increased gene expression of neurotrophins such as Neural growth factor (Ngf), Neurotrophin-3 (Nt3), and its receptors Tropomyosin receptor kinase TrkA and TrkB. Likewise, an increase in protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phospho-protein kinase B (p-Akt) in HFD+RSV F1 was found. These results suggest that maternal RSV supplementation under HFD intake prevents cognitive decline in senescence-accelerated mice prone 8 (SAMP8) adult offspring, promoting a reduction in triglycerides and leptin plasma levels, changes in the pro-inflammatory profile, and restoring the epigenetic landscape as well as synaptic plasticity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Links between Nutrition, Energy Metabolism, Aging and Cognition)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Interaction of Diet and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Aging and Cognition
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(7), 3574; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22073574 - 30 Mar 2021
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Abstract
Aging is inevitable and it is one of the major contributors to cognitive decline. However, the mechanisms underlying age-related cognitive decline are still the object of extensive research. At the biological level, it is unknown how the aging brain is subjected to progressive [...] Read more.
Aging is inevitable and it is one of the major contributors to cognitive decline. However, the mechanisms underlying age-related cognitive decline are still the object of extensive research. At the biological level, it is unknown how the aging brain is subjected to progressive oxidative stress and neuroinflammation which determine, among others, mitochondrial dysfunction. The link between mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive impairment is becoming ever more clear by the presence of significant neurological disturbances in human mitochondrial diseases. Possibly, the most important lifestyle factor determining mitochondrial functioning is nutrition. Therefore, with the present work, we review the latest findings disclosing a link between nutrition, mitochondrial functioning and cognition, and pave new ways to counteract cognitive decline in late adulthood through diet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Links between Nutrition, Energy Metabolism, Aging and Cognition)
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