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Special Issue "Oral Health Promotion by Controlling the Composition of the Oral Microbiome"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Masahiro Yoneda
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka, Japan
Interests: oral bacteriology; halitosis; periodontitis; dental education; dental materials
Prof. Daniel Grenier
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
Interests: periodontal disease; natural plant compounds; pathogenic microorganisms; virulence factors; biofilm
Dr. Yasunori Yoshinaga
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka, Japan
Interests: periodontology; bone resorption; immunology
Prof. Dr. Nao Suzuki
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka, Japan
Interests: oral malodor; oral microbiome; probiotics; salivary components

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal diseases, oral malodor, root canal infections, and candidiasis are caused by microorganisms. More than 700 species of commensal microorganisms inhabit the human oral cavity, many of which have been of great interest to researchers due to their pathogenic properties and their association with specific oral infections. The interactions between these pathogens and other commensal bacteria are still not well understood. The use of antimicrobial agents, including antibiotics, is one strategy to prevent and treat oral diseases. However, the abuse and inappropriate use of antimicrobial agents may lead to drug-resistance or microbial substitution. Several research groups are developing novel strategies to transform the oral microbiome from a pathogenic one to a healthy one. Some are focusing on the application of probiotic therapies that may promote a healthy oral microbiome, while others are investigating natural plant compounds that can be used as antimicrobial, anti-biofilm, and anti-adhesion agents. Even some commonly dental materials have been found to exert beneficial effects on oral health. We are launching a call for papers that focus on the aspects mentioned above. Articles related to the molecular mechanisms behind the pharmaceutical effects are welcome. Clinical submissions with biomolecular experiments are also welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Masahiro Yoneda
Prof. Daniel Grenier
Dr. Yasunori Yoshinaga
Prof. Dr. Nao Suzuki
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral flora composition
  • probiotics
  • natural plant compounds
  • kampo medicine
  • dental materials
  • dental caries
  • periodontal diseases
  • root canal infections
  • oral malodor
  • candidiasis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Taxonomic and Gene Category Analyses of Subgingival Plaques from a Group of Japanese Individuals with and without Periodontitis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(10), 5298; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22105298 - 18 May 2021
Viewed by 813
Abstract
Periodontitis is an inflammation of tooth-supporting tissues, which is caused by bacteria in the subgingival plaque (biofilm) and the host immune response. Traditionally, subgingival pathogens have been investigated using methods such as culturing, DNA probes, or PCR. The development of next-generation sequencing made [...] Read more.
Periodontitis is an inflammation of tooth-supporting tissues, which is caused by bacteria in the subgingival plaque (biofilm) and the host immune response. Traditionally, subgingival pathogens have been investigated using methods such as culturing, DNA probes, or PCR. The development of next-generation sequencing made it possible to investigate the whole microbiome in the subgingival plaque. Previous studies have implicated dysbiosis of the subgingival microbiome in the etiology of periodontitis. However, details are still lacking. In this study, we conducted a metagenomic analysis of subgingival plaque samples from a group of Japanese individuals with and without periodontitis. In the taxonomic composition analysis, genus Bacteroides and Mycobacterium demonstrated significantly different compositions between healthy sites and sites with periodontal pockets. The results from the relative abundance of functional gene categories, carbohydrate metabolism, glycan biosynthesis and metabolism, amino acid metabolism, replication and repair showed significant differences between healthy sites and sites with periodontal pockets. These results provide important insights into the shift in the taxonomic and functional gene category abundance caused by dysbiosis, which occurs during the progression of periodontal disease. Full article
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