ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Regenerative Medicine: Role of Stem Cells and Innovative Biomaterials 2.0"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is a continuation of our previous Special Issue on “Regenerative Medicine: Role of Stem Cells and Innovative Biomaterials”.

Regenerative medicine is a growing area of the medical sciences that has the unique peculiarity of involving both the biological pathways and the clinical applications. Currently, the main actors of tissue regeneration are stem cells and biomaterials: The proper combination of these factors is the key to successfully treating damaged or lost tissues, to promoting tissue formation, and to restoring, at the same time, aesthetics and function. Future regenerative strategies will be aimed at developing innovative biologically-friendly and smart biomaterials, as well as at triggering stem cells towards specific lineages in clinical-grade conditions, also through the use of MSC-derived conditioned medium, exosomes or small molecules. The next approaches should overcome the current biological and clinical limitations and be able to use those autologous factors that can naïvely induce and promote the biological conditions that could guide and improve any kind of tissue regeneration. The biomedical applications of innovative coatings or functionalized surfaces have recently boosted the theranostic use of novel biomaterials. This Special Issue will highlight the most promising applications of tissue engineering in the future diagnostic and therapeutic procedures applied to the medical sciences.

Dr. Marco Tatullo
Prof. Dr. Adriano Piattelli
Prof. Dr. Barbara Zavan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Regenerative medicine
  • Biomaterials
  • Scaffolds
  • Stem cells
  • Smart materials
  • Exosomes
  • Functionalized surfaces
  • Coatings
  • Bioactive surfaces
  • Theranostics

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Therapy in Novel Porcine Model of Diffuse Liver Damage Induced by Repeated Biliary Obstruction
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(9), 4304; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22094304 - 21 Apr 2021
Viewed by 706
Abstract
In liver surgery, biliary obstruction can lead to secondary biliary cirrhosis, a life-threatening disease with liver transplantation as the only curative treatment option. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to improve liver function in both acute and chronic liver disease models. This [...] Read more.
In liver surgery, biliary obstruction can lead to secondary biliary cirrhosis, a life-threatening disease with liver transplantation as the only curative treatment option. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to improve liver function in both acute and chronic liver disease models. This study evaluated the effect of allogenic MSC transplantation in a large animal model of repeated biliary obstruction followed by partial hepatectomy. MSC transplantation supported the growth of regenerated liver tissue after 14 days (MSC group, n = 10: from 1087 ± 108 (0 h) to 1243 ± 92 mL (14 days); control group, n = 11: from 1080 ± 95 (0 h) to 1100 ± 105 mL (14 days), p = 0.016), with a lower volume fraction of hepatocytes in regenerated liver tissue compared to resected liver tissue (59.5 ± 10.2% vs. 70.2 ± 5.6%, p < 0.05). Volume fraction of connective tissue, blood vessels and bile vessels in regenerated liver tissue, serum levels of liver enzymes (AST, ALT, ALP and GGT) and liver metabolites (albumin, bilirubin, urea and creatinine), as well as plasma levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and TGF-β, were not affected by MSC transplantation. In our novel, large animal (pig) model of repeated biliary obstruction followed by partial hepatectomy, MSC transplantation promoted growth of liver tissue without any effect on liver function. This study underscores the importance of translating results between small and large animal models as well as the careful translation of results from animal model into human medicine. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Stem Cells and Their Derivatives—Implications for Alveolar Bone Regeneration: A Comprehensive Review
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(21), 11746; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms222111746 - 29 Oct 2021
Viewed by 332
Abstract
Oral and craniofacial bone defects caused by congenital disease or trauma are widespread. In the case of severe alveolar bone defect, autologous bone grafting has been considered a “gold standard”; however, the procedure has several disadvantages, including limited supply, resorption, donor site morbidity, [...] Read more.
Oral and craniofacial bone defects caused by congenital disease or trauma are widespread. In the case of severe alveolar bone defect, autologous bone grafting has been considered a “gold standard”; however, the procedure has several disadvantages, including limited supply, resorption, donor site morbidity, deformity, infection, and bone graft rejection. In the last few decades, bone tissue engineering combined with stem cell-based therapy may represent a possible alternative to current bone augmentation techniques. The number of studies investigating different cell-based bone tissue engineering methods to reconstruct alveolar bone damage is rapidly rising. As an interdisciplinary field, bone tissue engineering combines the use of osteogenic cells (stem cells/progenitor cells), bioactive molecules, and biocompatible scaffolds, whereas stem cells play a pivotal role. Therefore, our work highlights the osteogenic potential of various dental tissue-derived stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the progress in differentiation techniques of iPSCs into osteoprogenitor cells, and the efforts that have been made to fabricate the most suitable and biocompatible scaffold material with osteoinductive properties for successful bone graft generation. Moreover, we discuss the application of stem cell-derived exosomes as a compelling new form of “stem-cell free” therapy. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review
Stem Cells in Autologous Microfragmented Adipose Tissue: Current Perspectives in Osteoarthritis Disease
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(19), 10197; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms221910197 - 22 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 591
Abstract
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic debilitating disorder causing pain and gradual degeneration of weight-bearing joints with detrimental effects on cartilage volume as well as cartilage damage, generating inflammation in the joint structure. The etiology of OA is multifactorial. Currently, therapies are mainly addressing [...] Read more.
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic debilitating disorder causing pain and gradual degeneration of weight-bearing joints with detrimental effects on cartilage volume as well as cartilage damage, generating inflammation in the joint structure. The etiology of OA is multifactorial. Currently, therapies are mainly addressing the physical and occupational aspects of osteoarthritis using pharmacologic pain treatment and/or surgery to manage the symptomatology of the disease with no specific regard to disease progression or prevention. Herein, we highlight alternative therapeutics for OA specifically considering innovative and encouraging translational methods with the use of adipose mesenchymal stem cells. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Ex Vivo Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy to Regenerate Machine Perfused Organs
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(10), 5233; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22105233 - 15 May 2021
Viewed by 718
Abstract
Transplantation represents the treatment of choice for many end-stage diseases but is limited by the shortage of healthy donor organs. Ex situ normothermic machine perfusion (NMP) has the potential to extend the donor pool by facilitating the use of marginal quality organs such [...] Read more.
Transplantation represents the treatment of choice for many end-stage diseases but is limited by the shortage of healthy donor organs. Ex situ normothermic machine perfusion (NMP) has the potential to extend the donor pool by facilitating the use of marginal quality organs such as those from donors after cardiac death (DCD) and extended criteria donors (ECD). NMP provides a platform for organ quality assessment but also offers the opportunity to treat and eventually regenerate organs during the perfusion process prior to transplantation. Due to their anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and regenerative capacity, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered as an interesting tool in this model system. Only a limited number of studies have reported on the use of MSCs during ex situ machine perfusion so far with a focus on feasibility and safety aspects. At this point, no clinical benefits have been conclusively demonstrated, and studies with controlled transplantation set-ups are urgently warranted to elucidate favorable effects of MSCs in order to improve organs during ex situ machine perfusion. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop