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Special Issue "Yeast Research in the Post-genomic Era"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Monique Bolotin-Fukuhara
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Emeritus CNRS Research Director
Interests: mitochondria; yeast genomics; yeast transcriptional regulation; comparative genomics
Prof. Duccio Cavalieri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Firenze, Italy
Interests: ecology and evolutionary genomics of S. cerevisiae; microbiome analysis; computational metagenomics; ecology and evolutionary genomics of S. cerevisiae; microbiome analysis; computational metagenomics
Prof. Cécile Fairhead
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Université Paris-Saclay, France
Interests: yeast genomics; comparative genomics; sexual reproduction of yeasts; double-strand break repair

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Yeasts research has a long tradition of basic studies which have greatly contributed to unravel the life mechanisms of the cellular eucaryotic cell. Talking of yeasts at the time was mostly talking about Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with some other yeasts such as S. pombe, K. lactis, Yarrowia lypolitica, C. albicans or C. glabrata only being used to examine some very specific questions relating to their physiology.

Everything changed in the 1990s when genomics studies first appeared. If S. cerevisiae was the first eucaryotic genome to be sequenced and functionally analyzed, soon many yeast genomes were being investigated.

This opened the door to the detailed studies of many different yeast genomes and to the field of comparative genomics and evolutionary studies. Yeast provided, for the first time, the ability to understand and unravel the causal relationship between networks of genes and phenotype using forward and reverse genetics, becoming the cradle and stage for modern systems and quantitative biology.

Our aim in this Special Issue is to give to the scientific community some insight into the new avenues which are now processed in this post-genomic era. Evolutionary studies, synthetic biology, population genomics, and biotechnologies have appropriated the new tools and concepts for new research avenues to take place.

Dr. Monique Bolotin-Fukuhara
Prof. Duccio Cavalieri
Prof. Cécile Fairhead
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • yeasts
  • evolutionary genomics
  • comparative genomics
  • synthetic biology
  • population genomics
  • biotechnologies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Metabolic, Organoleptic and Transcriptomic Impact of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis of Linear and Substituted Esters
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(8), 4026; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22084026 - 14 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 545
Abstract
Esters constitute a broad family of volatile compounds impacting the organoleptic properties of many beverages, including wine and beer. They can be classified according to their chemical structure. Higher alcohol acetates differ from fatty acid ethyl esters, whereas a third group, substituted ethyl [...] Read more.
Esters constitute a broad family of volatile compounds impacting the organoleptic properties of many beverages, including wine and beer. They can be classified according to their chemical structure. Higher alcohol acetates differ from fatty acid ethyl esters, whereas a third group, substituted ethyl esters, contributes to the fruitiness of red wines. Derived from yeast metabolism, the biosynthesis of higher alcohol acetates and fatty acid ethyl esters has been widely investigated at the enzymatic and genetic levels. As previously reported, two pairs of esterases, respectively encoded by the paralogue genes ATF1 and ATF2, and EEB1 and EHT1, are mostly involved in the biosynthesis of higher alcohol acetates and fatty acid ethyl esters. These esterases have a moderate effect on the biosynthesis of substituted ethyl esters, which depend on mono-acyl lipases encoded by MGL2 and YJU3. The functional characterization of such genes helps to improve our understanding of substituted ester metabolism in the context of wine alcohol fermentation. In order to evaluate the overall sensorial impact of esters, we attempted to produce young red wines without esters by generating a multiple esterase-free strain (Δatf1, Δatf2, Δeeb1, and Δeht1). Surprisingly, it was not possible to obtain the deletion of MGL2 in the Δatf1atf2/Δeeb1/Δeht1 background, highlighting unsuspected genetic incompatibilities between ATF1 and MGL2. A preliminary RNA-seq analysis depicted the overall effect of the Δatf1atf2/Δeeb1/Δeht1 genotype that triggers the expression shift of 1124 genes involved in nitrogen and lipid metabolism, but also chromatin organization and histone acetylation. These findings reveal unsuspected regulatory roles of ester metabolism in genome expression for the first time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeast Research in the Post-genomic Era)
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Review

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Review
Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a Powerful Model for Studying rRNA Modifications and Their Effects on Translation Fidelity
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(14), 7419; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22147419 - 10 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 595
Abstract
Ribosomal RNA is a major component of the ribosome. This RNA plays a crucial role in ribosome functioning by ensuring the formation of the peptide bond between amino acids and the accurate decoding of the genetic code. The rRNA carries many chemical modifications [...] Read more.
Ribosomal RNA is a major component of the ribosome. This RNA plays a crucial role in ribosome functioning by ensuring the formation of the peptide bond between amino acids and the accurate decoding of the genetic code. The rRNA carries many chemical modifications that participate in its maturation, the formation of the ribosome and its functioning. In this review, we present the different modifications and how they are deposited on the rRNA. We also describe the most recent results showing that the modified positions are not 100% modified, which creates a heterogeneous population of ribosomes. This gave rise to the concept of specialized ribosomes that we discuss. The knowledge accumulated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is very helpful to better understand the role of rRNA modifications in humans, especially in ribosomopathies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeast Research in the Post-genomic Era)
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