Special Issue "Emotion, Cognition, and Empathy in Extended Reality Applications"

A special issue of Informatics (ISSN 2227-9709).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Arindam Dey
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia
Interests: empathic computing, extended reality, human-computer interaction
Prof. Dr. Mark Billinghurst
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, AUCKLAND 1010, New Zealand
Interests: augmented reality; empathic computing; virtual reality; interaction design; gesture based interfaces; multimodal interfaces

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Extended reality (XR) applications have now become advanced enough to be used in real-world use cases such as medicine, education, training, gaming, and remote collaboration. Over the last couple of decades, the majority of XR research primarily focused on engineering aspects of the system and recently has started focusing on the usability of the XR systems.

A new area of research in the XR domain is focusing on the emotional and cognitive aspects of the applications. The advent of mobile and affordable bio-sensors such as electroencephalography (EEG), electrocardiogram (ECG), and photoplethysmogram (PPG) have made it possible to measure and, in some cases, use neural activities and physiological signals in real-time during the usage of the XR applications.

In this Special Issue, we are inviting submissions where multidisciplinary work involving XR and Affective and/or Empathic Computing is performed. We are open to both original research and review articles. The scope of the submissions includes but is not limited to the following:

  • Extended reality (AR/VR/MR/XR)
  • Empathic computing in XR
  • Affective computing in XR
  • Adaptive XR interfaces
  • Measuring emotions and cognition in XR

Dr. Arindam Dey
Prof. Dr. Mark Billinghurst
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Informatics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Extended reality
  • Augmented reality
  • Virtual reality
  • Mixed reality
  • Empathic computing
  • Affective computing
  • Cognition
  • Emotion
  • Empathy
  • Remote collaboration

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
A Review of Hyperscanning and Its Use in Virtual Environments
Informatics 2020, 7(4), 55; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/informatics7040055 - 09 Dec 2020
Viewed by 1138
Abstract
Hyperscanning is a technique which simultaneously records the neural activity of two or more people. This is done using one of several neuroimaging methods, such as electroencephalography (EEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The use of hyperscanning has [...] Read more.
Hyperscanning is a technique which simultaneously records the neural activity of two or more people. This is done using one of several neuroimaging methods, such as electroencephalography (EEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The use of hyperscanning has seen a dramatic rise in recent years to monitor social interactions between two or more people. Similarly, there has been an increase in the use of virtual reality (VR) for collaboration, and an increase in the frequency of social interactions being carried out in virtual environments (VE). In light of this, it is important to understand how interactions function within VEs, and how they can be enhanced to improve their quality in a VE. In this paper, we present some of the work that has been undertaken in the field of social neuroscience, with a special emphasis on hyperscanning. We also cover the literature detailing the work that has been carried out in the human–computer interaction domain that addresses remote collaboration. Finally, we present a way forward where these two research domains can be combined to explore how monitoring the neural activity of a group of participants in VE could enhance collaboration among them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotion, Cognition, and Empathy in Extended Reality Applications)
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