Special Issue "Nursing Informatics: Consumer-Centred Digital Health"

A special issue of Informatics (ISSN 2227-9709). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Informatics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2021) | Viewed by 9260

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Diane Skiba
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Nursing, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Center Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
Interests: consumer engagement; digital health tools; informatics education
Dr. Michelle Honey
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Nursing, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Interests: nursing informatics; nursing education; consumer readiness for ICT

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The discipline of nursing informatics has thrived over the last decade. Nursing informaticists are working across the globe to guide the use of technologies to provide safe, efficient, and quality care for patients. In the past, nursing informatics focused on the implementation of electronic health records and other clinical systems. In 2020 and beyond, we will witness the expansion of patient-centered digital health tools within an ever-changing digital health ecosystem. Trends in virtual care, consumer participation, digital health tools, artificial intelligence, robotics, and precision health have all facilitated the transformation of the health care delivery system. In this Special Issue, we are interested in articles related to the use of digital health tools to foster patient- or consumer-centered care.

Prof. Dr. Diane Skiba
Dr. Michelle Honey
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Informatics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Apps
  • Telehealth
  • Virtual visits
  • Preparation of nurses to work in the digital ecosystem
  • Patient portals
  • Health literacy
  • Chatbots
  • Virtual patient monitoring
  • Wearables

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Nursing Informatics: Consumer-Centred Digital Health
Informatics 2021, 8(4), 67; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/informatics8040067 - 30 Sep 2021
Viewed by 832
Abstract
In the past, nursing informatics has tended to focus on the implementation of systems [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing Informatics: Consumer-Centred Digital Health)

Research

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Article
Defining Valid Activity Monitor Data: A Multimethod Analysis of Weight-Loss Intervention Participants’ Barriers to Wear and First 100 Days of Physical Activity
Informatics 2021, 8(2), 39; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/informatics8020039 - 06 Jun 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1578
Abstract
Despite the popularity of commercially available wearable activity monitors (WAMs), there is a paucity of consistent methodology for analyzing large amounts of accelerometer data from these devices. This multimethod study aimed to inform appropriate Fitbit wear thresholds for physical activity (PA) outcomes assessment [...] Read more.
Despite the popularity of commercially available wearable activity monitors (WAMs), there is a paucity of consistent methodology for analyzing large amounts of accelerometer data from these devices. This multimethod study aimed to inform appropriate Fitbit wear thresholds for physical activity (PA) outcomes assessment in a sample of 616 low-income, majority Latina patients with obesity enrolled in a behavioral weight-loss intervention. Secondly, this study aimed to understand intervention participants’ barriers to Fitbit use. We applied a heart rate (HR) criterion (≥10 h/day) and a step count (SC) criterion (≥1000 steps/day) to 100 days of continuous activity monitor data. We examined the prevalence of valid wear and PA outcomes between analytic subgroups of participants who met the HR criterion, SC criterion, or both. We undertook qualitative analysis of research staff notes and participant interviews to explore barriers to valid Fitbit data collection. Overall, one in three participants did not meet the SC criterion for valid wear in Weeks 1 and 13; however, we found the SC criterion to be more inclusive of participants who did not use a smartphone than the HR criterion. Older age, higher body mass index (BMI), barriers to smartphone use, device storage issues, and negative emotional responses to WAM-based self-monitoring may predict higher proportions of invalid WAM data in weight-loss intervention research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing Informatics: Consumer-Centred Digital Health)
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Article
The Intention and Influence Factors of Nurses’ Participation in Telenursing
Informatics 2021, 8(2), 35; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/informatics8020035 - 18 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1393
Abstract
This study aimed to identify factors that significantly affect the behavioral intention of nursing staff to practice telenursing, applying the decomposed theory of planned behavior (DTPB) as the research framework. This cross-sectional survey study collected data from a valid sample of 203 responses [...] Read more.
This study aimed to identify factors that significantly affect the behavioral intention of nursing staff to practice telenursing, applying the decomposed theory of planned behavior (DTPB) as the research framework. This cross-sectional survey study collected data from a valid sample of 203 responses from nurses from a regional hospital in Taipei City, Taiwan. The results of data analysis showed that nursing staff’s attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control toward telenursing correlated positively with behavioral intention to participate in telenursing. Decomposing the main concepts identified two significant predictive determinants that influence nurses’ behavioral intentions: (a) facilitating conditions (β = 0.394, t = 5.817, p = 0.000 < 0.001) and (b) supervisor influence (β= 0.232, t = 3.431, p = 0.001 < 0.01), which together explain 28.6% of the variance for behavioral intention. The results of this study indicated that support and encouragement from nursing supervisors are important factors affecting nurses’ intention to practice telenursing. Education and training, health policies advocacy and the provision of adequate facilitating technologies and recourses are important factors for improving intention to practice telenursing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing Informatics: Consumer-Centred Digital Health)
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Article
Digital Educational Support Groups Administered through WhatsApp Messenger Improve Health-Related Knowledge and Health Behaviors of New Adolescent Mothers in the Dominican Republic: A Multi-Method Study
Informatics 2020, 7(4), 51; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/informatics7040051 - 05 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1383
Abstract
(1) Background: In limited-resource settings such as the Dominican Republic, many factors contribute to poor health outcomes experienced by adolescent mothers, including insufficient support and/or health knowledge. In response, we designed a digital educational support group, administered through WhatsApp Messenger, for new [...] Read more.
(1) Background: In limited-resource settings such as the Dominican Republic, many factors contribute to poor health outcomes experienced by adolescent mothers, including insufficient support and/or health knowledge. In response, we designed a digital educational support group, administered through WhatsApp Messenger, for new adolescent mothers. The purpose of this study was to assess if participation in this digital support group could improve health outcomes and health behaviors. (2) Methods: Participants completed questionnaires with a health literacy screener, demographic items, knowledge questions, the Index of Autonomous Functioning, and five Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System scales before and after the moderator-led intervention. Differences between pre- and post-intervention scores were calculated and perceptions of the intervention were explored through in-depth interviews analyzed with content analysis. Participants’ well-baby visit attendance and contraceptive use were compared to that of controls and a national sample. (3) Results: Participants’ (N = 58) knowledge scores increased (p < 0.05). Participants were 6.58 times more likely to attend well-baby visits than controls (95% CI: 2.23–19.4) and their contraceptive use was higher than that of the national sample (p < 0.05). Participants indicated the intervention was enjoyable and beneficial. (4) Conclusion: This adolescent-centered digital intervention is a promising method to improve health outcomes and health behaviors of young mothers in limited-resource settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing Informatics: Consumer-Centred Digital Health)

Other

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Systematic Review
A Systematic Review of Design Workshops for Health Information Technologies
Informatics 2021, 8(2), 34; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/informatics8020034 - 14 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1619
Abstract
Background: Design workshops offer effective methods in eliciting end-user participation from design inception to completion. Workshops unite stakeholders in the utilization of participatory methods, coalescing in the best possible creative solutions. Objective: This systematic review aimed to identify design approaches whilst providing guidance [...] Read more.
Background: Design workshops offer effective methods in eliciting end-user participation from design inception to completion. Workshops unite stakeholders in the utilization of participatory methods, coalescing in the best possible creative solutions. Objective: This systematic review aimed to identify design approaches whilst providing guidance to health information technology designers/researchers in devising and organizing workshops. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in five medical/library databases identifying 568 articles. The initial duplication removal resulted in 562 articles. A criteria-based screening of the title field, abstracts, and pre-full-texts reviews resulted in 72 records for full-text review. The final review resulted in 10 article exclusions. Results: 62 publications were included in the review. These studies focused on consumer facing and clinical health information technologies. The studied technologies involved both clinician and patients and encompassed an array of health conditions. Diverse workshop activities and deliverables were reported. Only seven publications reported workshop evaluation data. Discussion: This systematic review focused on workshops as a design and research activity in the health informatics domain. Our review revealed three themes: (1) There are a variety of ways of conducting design workshops; (2) Workshops are effective design and research approaches; (3) Various levels of workshop details were reported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing Informatics: Consumer-Centred Digital Health)
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Opinion
Patient Care, Information, Communication and Social Media Influencing Bias—A Discourse
Informatics 2021, 8(2), 28; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/informatics8020028 - 18 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1255
Abstract
Misinformation and disinformation are prevalent across society today, their rise to prominence developed mainly through the expansion of social media. Communication has always been recognised in health and care settings as the most important element between people who are receiving care and those [...] Read more.
Misinformation and disinformation are prevalent across society today, their rise to prominence developed mainly through the expansion of social media. Communication has always been recognised in health and care settings as the most important element between people who are receiving care and those delivering, managing, and evaluating care. This paper, through a discourse approach, will explore communication through the perception of information formed following personal selection of influencers and try to determine how such affects patient care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing Informatics: Consumer-Centred Digital Health)
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