Special Issue "Visual Text Analysis in Digital Humanities"

A special issue of Information (ISSN 2078-2489). This special issue belongs to the section "Information Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 October 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Stefan Jänicke
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
Interests: information visualization; visualization in applications; digital humanities; text visualization; geovisualization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since Franco Moretti introduced the term “distant reading”, visualization as a means to quantitatively analyze textual data has become increasingly important for digital humanities applications in recent years. The utility of visualization to verify and generate hypotheses, and to provide new perspectives on text is well-documented in various publications published in different venues. At the same time, there are many open challenges, for example, concerning the visual analysis of large text corpora or the visualization of textual uncertainties.

This Special Issue seeks contributions reporting on recent advancements concerning visual text analysis from scholars who engage in the context of digital humanities and visualization. This includes novel techniques to visually communicate textual features, as well as the discussion of visual exploration frameworks and visual analytics systems that might bear on or combine well-established visualization techniques, but support textual scholars’ tasks for which no appropriate solutions existed before. Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Digital close reading;
  • Distant readings of text;
  • Corpus analysis;
  • Discourse analysis;
  • News and social media analysis;
  • Translation studies;
  • Textual variation;
  • Text re-use detection and analysis;
  • Digital libraries;
  • Visual depictions of textual uncertainty (fragmentary availability, imprecise OCR, uncertain metadata, authorship attribution, etc.).

In addition to application-driven contributions, this Special Issue also welcomes submissions with extensive reflections on interdisciplinary collaborations between textual scholars and visualization experts. These papers will act as a guide for researchers working on the intersection of digital humanities and visualization, and will be useful for scholars who follow participatory design approaches involving experts from various research domains.

Dr. Stefan Jänicke
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • text visualization
  • close reading visualization
  • distant reading visualization
  • digital humanities
  • visual exploration
  • visual text analysis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Impresso Inspect and Compare. Visual Comparison of Semantically Enriched Historical Newspaper Articles
Information 2021, 12(9), 348; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/info12090348 - 27 Aug 2021
Viewed by 519
Abstract
The automated enrichment of mass-digitised document collections using techniques such as text mining is becoming increasingly popular. Enriched collections offer new opportunities for interface design to allow data-driven and visualisation-based search, exploration and interpretation. Most such interfaces integrate close and distant reading and [...] Read more.
The automated enrichment of mass-digitised document collections using techniques such as text mining is becoming increasingly popular. Enriched collections offer new opportunities for interface design to allow data-driven and visualisation-based search, exploration and interpretation. Most such interfaces integrate close and distant reading and represent semantic, spatial, social or temporal relations, but often lack contrastive views. Inspect and Compare (I&C) contributes to the current state of the art in interface design for historical newspapers with highly versatile side-by-side comparisons of query results and curated article sets based on metadata and semantic enrichments. I&C takes search queries and pre-curated article sets as inputs and allows comparisons based on the distributions of newspaper titles, publication dates and automatically generated enrichments, such as language, article types, topics and named entities. Contrastive views of such data reveal patterns, help humanities scholars to improve search strategies and to facilitate a critical assessment of the overall data quality. I&C is part of the impresso interface for the exploration of digitised and semantically enriched historical newspapers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Text Analysis in Digital Humanities)
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