Special Issue "Urban Geotechnical Engineering"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. S. Sonny Kim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environmental, Civil, Agricultural, and Mechanical Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
Interests: tidal marsh soils; transportation geotechnics; nondestructive remote sensing and machine learning application in geomaterials
Dr. Jongwan Eun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering College of Engineering, 203C Peter Kiewit Institute, 1110 South 67th Street, Omaha, NE 68182-0176, USA
Interests: geotechnical and geoenvironmental engineering; multiphase mass transport through porous and nonporous medium; unsaturated behavior of geomaterials; advanced application of sensing technics for geosystem; sustainable geotechnics
Dr. Soonkie Nam
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering and Construction, Georgia Southern University, P.O. Box 8077, Statesboro, GA 30460, USA
Interests: unsaturated soils; stability; soil improvement & engineered materials; transportation geotechnics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

President Franklin D. Roosevelt stated that “a nation that destroys its soils destroys itself." Soils form over hundreds of years, and yet can be destroyed by a single event. Construction activities are an example of man-made hazards causing subsequent ground subsidence (i.e., underground cavity). However, man-made geotechnical hazards are an often-overlooked asset, despite being the foundation of urban geotechnical engineering. As such, the accurate acquisition of these assets is strategic for identifying and planning the most effective rehabilitation and maintenance works.

As natural geomaterials and geologic formations commonly involve inherent variability and complexities, the characterization of geotechnical properties in urban areas is one of the most challenging yet important activities required for the successful planning, design, construction, and operation of a resilient civil infrastructure. Geologic fractures and discontinuities (e.g., slip surfaces, joints, and faults) also play a critical role in a wide variety of engineering problems. Examples range from landslides and progressive failures in shallow geotechnical systems, to hydraulic fracturing, geologic CO2 sequestration, and induced seismicity in deep subsurface systems. Transportation geotechnics and tunnelling are also important subjects that should be disseminated to urban geotechnical engineering societies.

This Special Issue focuses on the current practices related to the aforementioned issues, which consider a wide-ranged geotechnical issues covering the following:

  • Case studies of advanced seismic wave-based geo-characterization
  • Simulation of propagating fractures using any standard numerical methods, including the finite element method
  • Multiphase fluid flow for soil improvement
  • Dynamic tunnel modelling by reflecting the operating conditions and ground conditions in real time
  • Application of non-destructive technology to investigate urban geotechnical engineering issues.

Through the Special Issue, the innovative practices, case histories, and significant geotechnical challenges will be shared and disseminated.

Dr. S. Sonny Kim
Dr. Jongwan Eun
Dr. Soonkie Nam
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Urban geotechnical engineering
  • Energy geotechnics
  • Geo-environment
  • Mechanized tunneling
  • Geo-sensing technology
  • Transportation geotechnics
  • Geologic fractures and discontinuities
  • Smart materials

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Layer Composition of Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement Optimized Using a Regression Analysis Method
Infrastructures 2021, 6(4), 56; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/infrastructures6040056 - 06 Apr 2021
Viewed by 248
Abstract
A procedure for determining the optimized composition of layer properties for a continuously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) system was constructed using field tests, finite element (FE) analysis, and regression analysis methods. The field support characteristics of a rigid pavement system were investigated using [...] Read more.
A procedure for determining the optimized composition of layer properties for a continuously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) system was constructed using field tests, finite element (FE) analysis, and regression analysis methods. The field support characteristics of a rigid pavement system were investigated using a falling weight deflectometer (FWD), dynamic cone penetrometer (DCP), and a static plate load test. The subgrade layer exhibited a more uniform condition than the aggregate base, and the modulus of the subgrade reaction of the aggregate base and subgrade combination (effective k-value) was improved by about 1.5 times by introducing a 2 inch (50.8 mm) asphalt stabilized base (ASB) layer. Thereafter, FE support models describing the actual field conditions were studied. The effects of the thickness of the stabilized base layer, the elastic modulus of the stabilized base material, and the effective k-value on the composite k-value of the support system were identified using a regression analysis method, and the results showed that the variables had a similar effect when determining the composite k-value. Afterward, a procedure for selecting the layer properties for producing a suitable composite k-value was constructed, and we identified that the maximum stress in the concrete slab was induced at different levels, even with identical composite k-values. Lastly, regression relationships were derived to estimate the maximum stress in the concrete slab by considering both the support layer properties and the concrete slab. Subsequently, an algorithm for selecting an optimized layer composition of the CRCP structure was construction considering the economical aspect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Geotechnical Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
In Situ Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste Using Membrane Interface Probe (MIP) and Hydraulic Profiling Tool (HPT) in an Active and Closed Landfill
Infrastructures 2021, 6(3), 33; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/infrastructures6030033 - 01 Mar 2021
Viewed by 319
Abstract
Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills near a metropolitan area are renewable energy resources to produce heat and methane that can generate electricity. However, it is difficult to use those sources productively because disposed MSW in landfills are spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Regarding the [...] Read more.
Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills near a metropolitan area are renewable energy resources to produce heat and methane that can generate electricity. However, it is difficult to use those sources productively because disposed MSW in landfills are spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Regarding the prediction of the sources, the analysis of in situ MSW properties is an alternative way to reduce the uncertainty and to understand complex processes undergoing in the landfill effectively. A hydraulic profiling tool (HPT) and membrane interface probe (MIP) test measures the continuous profile of MSW properties with depth, including hydraulic pressure, temperature, electrical conductivity (EC), and the relative concentration of methane at the field. In this study, we conducted a series of the tests to investigate the MSW characteristics of active and closed landfills. MIP results showed that the methane existed closer to right below the top cover in the active landfill and several peak concentrations at different layers of the closed landfill. As the depth and age of the waste increased, the hydraulic pressure increased for both landfills. The average EC results showed that the electrical conductivity decreased with the landfill age. The results of hydraulic properties, temperature, and EC obtained from active and closed sites could be used to estimate the waste age and help designing energy recovery systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Geotechnical Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Estimating Hydraulic Conductivity of Overconsolidated Soils Based on Piezocone Penetration Test (PCPT)
Infrastructures 2021, 6(3), 32; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/infrastructures6030032 - 28 Feb 2021
Viewed by 320
Abstract
Overconsolidated (OC) soils may develop a low or negative pore pressure during PCPT. Thus, it is challenging to develop an “on-the-fly” estimation of hydraulic conductivity from PCPT results. This study presents a method to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of OC soils from PCPT [...] Read more.
Overconsolidated (OC) soils may develop a low or negative pore pressure during PCPT. Thus, it is challenging to develop an “on-the-fly” estimation of hydraulic conductivity from PCPT results. This study presents a method to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of OC soils from PCPT results based on a previously developed method for normally consolidated (NC) soils. To apply the existing method, PCPT pore pressure in OC soils is adjusted by using a correction factor. An equation for the correction factor is derived based on the concepts of critical state soil mechanics, cavity expansion, and consolidation theories. Then, it was reformulated so that traditional cone indices could be used as input parameters. It is shown that the correction factor is mainly influenced by the cone tip resistance, pore pressure, and the rigidity index. The comparison of predicted, which is based on corrected pore pressure and measured hydraulic conductivity showed a good match for four well documented data sets. With the findings of the study, it is expected that an “on-the-fly” estimation of hydraulic conductivity of overconsolidated soils is possible. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Geotechnical Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Experimental and Numerical Studies on Thermally-Induced Slip Ratcheting on a Slope
Infrastructures 2021, 6(1), 5; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/infrastructures6010005 - 31 Dec 2020
Viewed by 446
Abstract
Mild temperature fluctuation of a material sitting on a slope may only cause a small slip, but a large number of the repeated temperature changes can amplify the magnitude of the overall slip and eventually bring an issue of structural instability. The slip [...] Read more.
Mild temperature fluctuation of a material sitting on a slope may only cause a small slip, but a large number of the repeated temperature changes can amplify the magnitude of the overall slip and eventually bring an issue of structural instability. The slip accumulation starts from the minor magnitude and reaches the extensive level called “slip ratcheting”. Experimental evidence for such thermally-induced slip ratcheting is first provided in this work. It is implemented with an acryl sheet placed on an inclined wood with a mild angle; it is found that the temperature fluctuation of the acryl sheet causes the sheet to slide down gradually without any additional loading. The numerical model is then attempted to emulate the major findings of the experiments. From the simulation work, the location of a neutral point is found when the acryl plate is heated, and another neutral point is observed when cooled down. The shift of the neutral point appears to be a major reason for the unrecovered slip after a temperature increase and decrease cycle. Finally, a parametric study using the numerical model is carried out to examine which parameters play a major role in the development of residual slips. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Geotechnical Engineering)
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