Special Issue "Metal-Based Anticancer Drugs"

A special issue of Inorganics (ISSN 2304-6740). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioinorganic Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Vladimir Arion
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währinger Str. 42, 1090 Vienna, Austria
Interests: coordination and bioinorganic chemistry, more specifically development of metal-based anticancer drugs based on isomeric indoloquinolines, indolobenzazepines, indolobenzazocines and indolobenzazonines, as well as on thiosemicarbazones; ruthenium-nitrosyl complexes with heterocyclic azoles as NO-releasing molecules and potential aniticancer drugs; bis-(thio)semicarbazide macrocyclic complexes as catalysts in alkane oxidation; transition metal complexes with noninnocent open-chain ligands
Prof. Dr. Debbie C. Crans
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
Interests: vanadium; metals in medicine; drugs and biologically active compounds; lipid and lipid model interfaces; pharmaceutically active compounds; cancer; diabetes; tuberculosis; hydrophobic compounds; spectroscopy; hydrophobic compounds; transition metals; reverse micelles; chemistry in confined spaces
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ignacio E. Leon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Química Inorgánica (CEQUINOR), CONICET‐UNLP, La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Interests: metal-based drugs; anticancer compounds; antimicrobial compounds; medicinal inorganic chemistry; copper, ruthenium, vanadium and platinum complexes; nanoparticles; drug delivery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of metal complexes as anticancer agents revolutionized cancer treatment more than fifty years ago with the discovery of cisplatin, cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2]. Further research led to clinical use of other platinum drugs, namely, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. The main deficiencies of the platinum-based drugs are their severe side effects and drug resistance. New metal-based anticancer drugs including essential and nonessential metals that have a different mode of action might be able to broaden the spectrum of treatable cancers, reduce toxic side effects, and overcome platinum resistance. The concept of selective targeting of cancer cells remains a challenge. Many new approaches to the design of innovative metal-based anticancer drugs are currently emerging. These include prodrugs, dual or multi-action prodrugs, etc. Even though the chemistry of metal-based drugs has made considerable progress, there are other drawbacks such as poor aqueous solubility and pharmacological issues. To enhance the efficacy of new metal-based drugs, prodrug and targeting strategies, as well as suitable drug delivery approaches, are being developed (design and synthesis of new ligands, nanocarriers, etc.). The importance of studies into the underlying mechanisms of action, which have led to new molecular targets for metal-based drugs, is also increasing. This Special Issue aims to highlight the progress in the field of development of new metal-based anticancer drugs.

Prof. Dr. Vladimir Arion
Prof. Dr. Debbie C. Crans
Prof. Dr. Ignacio E. Leon
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Inorganics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • anticancer metallodrugs
  • antimicrobial compounds
  • drug delivery
  • nanocarriers
  • drugs and biologically active compounds
  • pharmaceutically active compounds
  • metals in medicine

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Synthesis, Crystal Structure, Spectroscopic Characterization, DFT Calculations and Cytotoxicity Assays of a New Cu(II) Complex with an Acylhydrazone Ligand Derived from Thiophene
Inorganics 2021, 9(2), 9; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/inorganics9020009 - 20 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 937
Abstract
A new Cu(II) complex is synthetized by the reaction of copper nitrate and a N-acylhydrazone ligand obtained from the condensation of o-vanillin and 2-thiophecarbohydrazide (H2L). The solid-state structure of [Cu(HL)(H2O)](NO3)·H2O, or CuHL for [...] Read more.
A new Cu(II) complex is synthetized by the reaction of copper nitrate and a N-acylhydrazone ligand obtained from the condensation of o-vanillin and 2-thiophecarbohydrazide (H2L). The solid-state structure of [Cu(HL)(H2O)](NO3)·H2O, or CuHL for simplicity, was determined by X-ray diffraction. In the cationic complex, the copper center is in a nearly squared planar environment with the nitrate interacting as a counterion. CuHL was characterized by spectroscopic techniques, including solid-state FTIR, Raman, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and diffuse reflectance and solution UV-Vis electronic spectroscopy. Calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) assisted the interpretation and assignment of the spectroscopic data. The complex does not show relevant antioxidant activity evaluated by the radical cation of 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) method, being even less active than the free ligand as a radical quencher. Cytotoxicity assays of CuHL against three human tumor cell lines, namely MG-63, A549 and HT-29, revealed an important enhancement of the effectiveness as compared with both the ligand and the free metal ion. Moreover, its cytotoxic effect was remarkably stronger than that of the reference metallodrug cisplatin in all cancer cell lines tested, a promissory result in the search for new metallodrugs of essential transition metals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal-Based Anticancer Drugs)
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Review

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Review
Cytochrome c: Using Biological Insight toward Engineering an Optimized Anticancer Biodrug
Inorganics 2021, 9(11), 83; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/inorganics9110083 - 16 Nov 2021
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Abstract
The heme protein cytochrome c (Cyt c) plays pivotal roles in cellular life and death processes. In the respiratory chain of mitochondria, it serves as an electron transfer protein, contributing to the proliferation of healthy cells. In the cell cytoplasm, it activates intrinsic [...] Read more.
The heme protein cytochrome c (Cyt c) plays pivotal roles in cellular life and death processes. In the respiratory chain of mitochondria, it serves as an electron transfer protein, contributing to the proliferation of healthy cells. In the cell cytoplasm, it activates intrinsic apoptosis to terminate damaged cells. Insight into these mechanisms and the associated physicochemical properties and biomolecular interactions of Cyt c informs on the anticancer therapeutic potential of the protein, especially in its ability to subvert the current limitations of small molecule-based chemotherapy. In this review, we explore the development of Cyt c as an anticancer drug by identifying cancer types that would be receptive to the cytotoxicity of the protein and factors that can be finetuned to enhance its apoptotic potency. To this end, some information is obtained by characterizing known drugs that operate, in part, by triggering Cyt c induced apoptosis. The application of different smart drug delivery systems is surveyed to highlight important features for maintaining Cyt c stability and activity and improving its specificity for cancer cells and high drug payload release while recognizing the continuing limitations. This work serves to elucidate on the optimization of the strategies to translate Cyt c to the clinical market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal-Based Anticancer Drugs)
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