Special Issue "Organomanganese Chemistry"

A special issue of Inorganics (ISSN 2304-6740). This special issue belongs to the section "Organometallic Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. David C. Lacy
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260, USA
Interests: organomanganese; Mn(I) catalyzed; catalysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Much of our modern view of reactions in organometallic chemistry had its beginnings in studies involving organometallic manganese compounds. For instance, the migratory insertion reaction and M–M bonds were first systematically studies on manganese carbonyl complexes. However, organomanganese compounds faded into the background, while second and third-row transition metals took center stage. This of course was warranted because of their excellent catalytic properties, such as palladium cross coupling, olefin metathesis, and asymmetric hydrogenation, to name a few societally relevant organotransition metal catalyzed reactions. Until recently, organomanganese catalysts were limited to C–H bond functionalizations or niche applications. The metal–ligand cooperative paradigm, discovered and applied first in ruthenium-based hydrogenations, applied to Mn compounds has revitalized the field of organomanganese chemistry. This Special Issue on organomanganese chemistry emerges as part of this resurgence, but it is not limited to Mn(I) compounds that rely on metal–ligand cooperativity. The goal is to provide an open access resource for those exploring the exciting field of organometallic chemistry of the third-most abundant transition metal on Earth in all its forms that fit into the broadly defined class of organometallic chemistry.

Prof. Dr. David C. Lacy
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Inorganics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • organomanganese
  • catalysis
  • Mn(I)
  • earth-abundant transition metals

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Hydrosilylation of Aldehydes by a Manganese α-Diimine Complex
Inorganics 2020, 8(11), 61; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/inorganics8110061 - 10 Nov 2020
Viewed by 889
Abstract
This paper describes the catalytic activity of air stable and easy to handle manganese complexes towards the hydrosilylation of aldehydes. These catalysts incorporate a bulky diazabutadiene ligand and exhibit good functional group tolerance and chemoselectivity in the hydrosilylation of aldehydes, utilizing primary silanes [...] Read more.
This paper describes the catalytic activity of air stable and easy to handle manganese complexes towards the hydrosilylation of aldehydes. These catalysts incorporate a bulky diazabutadiene ligand and exhibit good functional group tolerance and chemoselectivity in the hydrosilylation of aldehydes, utilizing primary silanes as the reducing agent. The reactions proceed with turnover frequencies approaching 150 h−1 in some instances, similar to those observed for other manganese-based catalysts. The conversion of aromatic aldehydes to the corresponding alcohols was found to be more efficient than that for the analogous aliphatic systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organomanganese Chemistry)
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Review

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Review
Redox-Active Manganese Pincers for Electrocatalytic CO2 Reduction
Inorganics 2020, 8(11), 62; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/inorganics8110062 - 11 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 914
Abstract
The decrease of total amount of atmospheric CO2 is an important societal challenge in which CO2 reduction has an important role to play. Electrocatalytic CO2 reduction with homogeneous catalysts is based on highly tunable catalyst design and exploits an abundant [...] Read more.
The decrease of total amount of atmospheric CO2 is an important societal challenge in which CO2 reduction has an important role to play. Electrocatalytic CO2 reduction with homogeneous catalysts is based on highly tunable catalyst design and exploits an abundant C1 source to make valuable products such as fuels and fuel precursors. These methods can also take advantage of renewable electricity as a green reductant. Mn-based catalysts offer these benefits while incorporating a relatively cheap and abundant first-row transition metal. Historically, interest in this field started with Mn(bpy-R)(CO)3X, whose performance matched that of its Re counterparts while achieving substantially lower overpotentials. This review examines an emerging class of homogeneous Mn-based electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction, Mn complexes with meridional tridentate coordination also known as Mn pincers, most of which contain redox-active ligands that enable multi-electron catalysis. Although there are relatively few examples in the literature thus far, these catalysts bring forth new catalytic mechanisms not observed for the well-established Mn(bpy-R)(CO)3X catalysts, and show promising reactivity for future studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organomanganese Chemistry)
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