Special Issue "Advanced Functional Biomaterials for Dental Implants"

A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Vincenzo Grassia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Dental Specialties, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, 80138 Naples, Italy
Interests: dentofacial orthopedics; orthodontic biomechanics; clear aligners; miniscrews; multidisciplinary treatments
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dentistry, as a specialty, is believed to have commenced about 300 B.C. Cavities in teeth have been replaced or restored since ancient times with a variety of materials including stone chips, cork, metal foils, or sometimes human teeth. The main goal of dentistry is to enhance the quality of the life of dental patients. This can be achieved by the development and selection of biocompatible and durable tooth-filling materials, i.e., prosthetic materials that are able to stand the adverse conditions of our oral environment.

During the last decades, we have seen the development, characterization, and usage of new materials to repair and replace teeth. Four main groups of dental materials are used today, metals, ceramics, composites, and polymers. The recent focus of the dental materials involves the study of the composition, structure, and properties of the materials that dentists and laboratories are using and the way in which they are placed. It is true to say that dentists and dental technicians have a wider variety of materials than any other comparable professions.

Recent advances in this field, not only include synthesis and fabrication, but also the characterization of these materials, which has allowed us to understand these materials better and tailor them to specific applications, resulting in the creation of new and novel materials that are added to the armory of dental clinicians. Furthermore, the characterization techniques have allowed us to understand the properties of natural hard and soft tissues in detail providing a better understanding of their functions.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Vincenzo Grassia
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Biomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dental materials
  • glass–ionomers, characterization, bioactive materials
  • biocompatibility
  • oral cancer
  • dental tissue

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Bioactivity of an Experimental Dental Implant with Anodized Surface
J. Funct. Biomater. 2021, 12(2), 39; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jfb12020039 - 07 Jun 2021
Viewed by 804
Abstract
Background: Several studies proved that anodic oxidation improves osseointegration. This study aimed to optimize osseointegration through anodization in dental implants, obtaining anatase phase and controlled nanotopography. Methods: The division of the groups with 60 titanium implants was: control (CG); sandblasted (SG); anodized (AG): [...] Read more.
Background: Several studies proved that anodic oxidation improves osseointegration. This study aimed to optimize osseointegration through anodization in dental implants, obtaining anatase phase and controlled nanotopography. Methods: The division of the groups with 60 titanium implants was: control (CG); sandblasted (SG); anodized (AG): anodized pulsed current (duty cycle 30%, 30 V, 0.2 A and 1000 Hz). Before surgery, surface characterization was performed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy (EDS) and Raman Spectroscopy. For in vivo tests, 10 New Zealand white rabbits received an implant from each group. The sacrifice period was 2 and 6 weeks (n = 5) and the specimens were subjected to computed microtomography (μCT) and reverse torque test. Results: AFM and SEM demonstrated a particular nanotopography on the surface in AG; the anatase phase was proved by Raman spectroscopy. In the μCT and in the reverse torque test, the AG group presented better results than the other groups. Conclusion: The chemical composition and structure of the TiO2 film were positively affected by the anodizing technique, intensifying the biological characteristics in osseointegration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Biomaterials for Dental Implants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Aesthetic Outcomes and Peri-Implant Health of Angled Screw Retained Implant Restorations Compared with Cement Retained Crowns: Medium Term Follow-Up
J. Funct. Biomater. 2021, 12(2), 35; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jfb12020035 - 16 May 2021
Viewed by 668
Abstract
Single tooth implant restorations in the aesthetic area are a demanding challenge. If a complete osseointegration is mandatory, the final result has to result in a higher standard of biomimetic and soft tissue health among natural teeth. This outcome is traditionally pursued by [...] Read more.
Single tooth implant restorations in the aesthetic area are a demanding challenge. If a complete osseointegration is mandatory, the final result has to result in a higher standard of biomimetic and soft tissue health among natural teeth. This outcome is traditionally pursued by cementing crowns over individualized abutments. However, in recent years, the need for controlling peri-implant health and the preference towards a retrievable solution has led to an increase in screw-retained crowns, which is not always applicable when the implant axis is not ideal. In the aesthetic area, the use of a novel technical solution represented by the angled screw channel (ASC) of the abutment has been proposed in order to match the advantages of the screwed solution with the aesthetic demands. The aim of this study was to compare ASC crowns to cemented crowns (CC) in single implant restorations using the white esthetic score (WES) and pink esthetic score (PES) at the crown delivery and at a follow-up of a minimum of 2 years. Peri-implant health and marginal bone loss (MBL) were also evaluated. The mean follow-up was 44.3 months, with a mean MBL of 0.22 mm in the ASC group and 0.29 mm in the CC group. The total WES/PES score was 16.6 for ASC, compared with 17.3 for CC at baseline, and 16.2 and 17.1, respectively, at follow-up. Both of the groups reached a high WES/PES, and this was maintained over time, without signs of peri-implant diseases or bone loss, regardless of the choice of connection. In conclusion, ASC can be adopted in cases where the implant axis is not ideal, with aesthetic and functional results that are comparable to implants restored by cemented crowns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Biomaterials for Dental Implants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Implant Placement Following Crestal Sinus Lift with Sequential Drills and Osteotomes: Five Years after Final Loading Results from a Retrospective Study
J. Funct. Biomater. 2021, 12(1), 10; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jfb12010010 - 04 Feb 2021
Viewed by 637
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective study was to clinically evaluate the five-year outcomes of implants placed following a combined approach to the sinus, consisting of sequential drills and osteotomes. Medical records of patients with implants placed in combination with crestal sinus lift using [...] Read more.
The aim of this retrospective study was to clinically evaluate the five-year outcomes of implants placed following a combined approach to the sinus, consisting of sequential drills and osteotomes. Medical records of patients with implants placed in combination with crestal sinus lift using sequential drills and osteotomes, with a residual alveolar bone crest between 4 to 8 mm, and a follow-up of at least five years after final loading, were evaluated. Outcomes were implant and prosthetic survival and success rates, any complication, and marginal bone loss. Data from 96 patients (53 women and 43 men; mean age 54.7 years; range 23–79 years) were collected. A total of 105 single implants were analyzed. After five years of function, two implants were lost and two prostheses failed. No major biological or prosthetic complications occurred. At the five-year examination, the marginal bone loss was 1.24 ± 0.28 mm. Within the limitations of this retrospective study it can be concluded that implants placed following a combined approach to the sinus consisting of sequential drills and osteotomes seem to be a viable option for the treatment of posterior atrophic edentulous maxilla. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Biomaterials for Dental Implants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Mechanical Evaluation of the Stability of One or Two Miniscrews under Loading on Synthetic Bone
J. Funct. Biomater. 2020, 11(4), 80; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jfb11040080 - 05 Nov 2020
Viewed by 852
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the primary stability of a two-miniscrew system inserted into a synthetic bone and to compare the system with the traditional one. Forty-five bi-layered polyurethane blocks were used to simulate maxillary cancellous and cortical bone [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the primary stability of a two-miniscrew system inserted into a synthetic bone and to compare the system with the traditional one. Forty-five bi-layered polyurethane blocks were used to simulate maxillary cancellous and cortical bone densities. Samples were randomly assigned to three groups—one-miniscrew system (Group A, N = 23), two-miniscrew system (Group B, N = 22) and archwire-only (Group C, N = 10). A total of 67 new miniscrews were subdivided into Group A (23 singles) and Group B (22 couples). 30 mm of 19″ × 25″ archwires were tied to the miniscrew. The load was applied perpendicularly to the archwire. Maximum Load Value (MLV), Yield Load (YL) and Loosening Load (LL) were recorded for each group. The YL of Group B and C had a mean value respectively of 4.189 ± 0.390 N and 3.652 ± 0.064 N. The MLV of Group A, B and C had a mean value respectively of 1.871 ± 0.318N, of 4.843 ± 0.515 N and 4.150 ± 0.086 N. The LL of Group A and B had a mean value respectively of 1.871 ± 0.318 N and of 2.294 ± 0.333 N. A two- temporary anchorage device (TAD) system is on average stiffer than a one-TAD system under orthodontic loading. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Biomaterials for Dental Implants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Morphological Characteristics of the Osteoplastic Potential of Synthetic CaSiO3/HAp Powder Biocomposite
J. Funct. Biomater. 2020, 11(4), 68; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jfb11040068 - 23 Sep 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 994
Abstract
The study describes the influence of synthetic CaSiO3/HAp powder biocomposite on the process of regeneration in osseous tissue in the alveolar ridges in terms of the morphological characteristics of the osteoplastic potential. The authors investigated the osteoinduction and osteoconduction “in vivo” [...] Read more.
The study describes the influence of synthetic CaSiO3/HAp powder biocomposite on the process of regeneration in osseous tissue in the alveolar ridges in terms of the morphological characteristics of the osteoplastic potential. The authors investigated the osteoinduction and osteoconduction “in vivo” processes during bone tissue regeneration in the mandible defect area of an experimental animal (rabbit). The possibility of angiogenesis in the graft as an adaptation factor was studied in the process of bone tissue regeneration. The results of the histological study that included the qualitative parameters of bone tissue regeneration, the morphometric parameters (microarchitectonics) of the bone, the parameters of osteosynthesis (thickness of the osteoid plates), and resorption (volume density of the eroded surface) were presented. The results allowed the authors to characterize the possibility of the practical adaptation for synthetic powder biocomposite as an osteoplastic graft for the rehabilitation of osseous defects in dentistry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Biomaterials for Dental Implants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Novel Coatings to Minimize Bacterial Adhesion and Promote Osteoblast Activity for Titanium Implants
J. Funct. Biomater. 2020, 11(2), 42; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jfb11020042 - 16 Jun 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1748
Abstract
Titanium nitride (TiN) and silicon carbide (SiC) adhesion properties to biofilm and the proliferation of human osteoblasts were studied. Quaternized titanium nitride (QTiN) was produced by converting the surface nitrogen on TiN to a positive charge through a quaternization process to further improve [...] Read more.
Titanium nitride (TiN) and silicon carbide (SiC) adhesion properties to biofilm and the proliferation of human osteoblasts were studied. Quaternized titanium nitride (QTiN) was produced by converting the surface nitrogen on TiN to a positive charge through a quaternization process to further improve the antibacterial efficiency. The SiC required a nitridation within the plasma chamber of the surface layer before quaternization could be carried out to produce quaternized SiC (QSiC). The antimicrobial activity was evaluated on the reference strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis for 4 h by fluorescence microscopy using a live/dead viability kit. All the coatings exhibited a lower biofilm coverage compared to the uncoated samples (Ti—85.2%; TiN—24.22%; QTiN—11.4%; SiC—9.1%; QSiC—9.74%). Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images confirmed the reduction in P. gingivalis bacteria on the SiC and TiN-coated groups. After 24 h of osteoblast cultivation on the samples, the cell adhesion was observed on all the coated and uncoated groups. Fluorescence images demonstrated that the osteoblast cells adhered and proliferated on the surfaces. TiN and SiC coatings can inhibit the attachment of Porphyromonas gingivalis and promote osteoblast adhesion on the titanium used for implants. These coatings may possess the ability to prevent the development of peri-implantitis and stimulate osteointegration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Biomaterials for Dental Implants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop