Special Issue "Bioceramics and Bioactive Glass-Based Materials"

A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Anişoara Cîmpean
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Universitatea din Bucuresti, Bucuresti, Romania
Interests: biomaterials and biocompatibility; tissue engineering; stem cells and regenerative medicine; cell biology; clinical biochemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Florin Miculescu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Metallic Materials Science and Physical Metallurgy Department,Politehnica University of Bucharest, 060042 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: design and development of medical devices for bone reconstruction, synthesis, and preparation of calcium phosphates from natural sources; membrane materials; hybrid and composite materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 21st century has brought tremendous interest in bioceramics. They possess several properties which recommend them for biomedical applications, the most important one being tissue-bonding bioactivity.

Bioactivity– the property of materials to bond with tissues in vivo – of calcium phosphate-based materials has been intensely researched in the last decade, both for calcium phosphate bioceramics, as well as calcium phosphate-containing bioglasses. These types of materials can easily bond with hard tissues and under certain conditions even with soft tissues. Therefore, their use in or as different types of scaffolds utilized for tissue engineering has been growing.

In this special issue we aim to collect high-quality research on the following topics related to bioceramics and bioglasses:

  • Synthesis and Preparation
  • High-Resolution Characterisation
  • In Vitro and In Vivo testing
  • Biomedical Applications
  • Tissue Engineering

It is our pleasure to invite all of you to submit your research to this special issue. Research Articles, Short Communications and Review Papers are welcome!

Prof. Anişoara Cîmpean
Prof. Florin Miculescu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Biomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomimetic structures
  • bioceramics
  • bioglass
  • biocomposites
  • bone implants
  • dental
  • osteoconductive materials
  • tissue engineering

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Preparation and Characterization of Moldable Demineralized Bone Matrix/Calcium Sulfate Composite Bone Graft Materials
J. Funct. Biomater. 2021, 12(4), 56; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jfb12040056 - 04 Oct 2021
Viewed by 288
Abstract
Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is a decalcified allo/xenograft retaining collagen and noncollagenous proteins, which has been extensively used because of its osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties. Calcium sulfate (CaSO4, CS) is a synthetic bone substitute used in bone healing with biocompatible, nontoxic, [...] Read more.
Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is a decalcified allo/xenograft retaining collagen and noncollagenous proteins, which has been extensively used because of its osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties. Calcium sulfate (CaSO4, CS) is a synthetic bone substitute used in bone healing with biocompatible, nontoxic, bioabsorbable, osteoconductive, and good mechanical characteristics. This study aims to prepare a DBM/CS composite bone graft material in a moldable putty form without compromising the peculiar properties of DBM and CS. For this purpose, firstly, porcine femur was defatted using chloroform/methanol and extracted by acid for demineralization, then freeze-dried and milled/sieved to obtain DBM powder. Secondly, the α-form and β-form of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CaSO4·0.5H2O, CSH) were produced by heating gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). The morphology and particle sizes of α- and β-CSH were obtained by SEM, and their chemical properties were confirmed by EDS, FTIR and XRD. Furthermore, the DBM-based graft was mixed with α- or β-CSH at a ratio of 9:1, and glycerol/4% HPMC was added as a carrier to produce a putty. DBM/CSH putty possesses a low washout rate, good mechanical strength and biocompatibility. In conclusion, we believe that the moldable DBM/CSH composite putty developed in this study could be a promising substitute for the currently available bone grafts, and might have practical application in the orthopedics field as a potential bone void filler. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioceramics and Bioactive Glass-Based Materials)
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Article
Preliminary Studies on Graphene-Reinforced 3D Products Obtained by the One-Stage Sacrificial Template Method for Bone Reconstruction Applications
J. Funct. Biomater. 2021, 12(1), 13; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jfb12010013 - 12 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1151
Abstract
The bone remodeling field has shifted focus towards the delineation of products with two main critical attributes: internal architectures capable to promote fast cell colonization and good mechanical performance. In this paper, Luffa-fibers and graphene nanoplatelets were proposed as porogen template and [...] Read more.
The bone remodeling field has shifted focus towards the delineation of products with two main critical attributes: internal architectures capable to promote fast cell colonization and good mechanical performance. In this paper, Luffa-fibers and graphene nanoplatelets were proposed as porogen template and mechanical reinforcing agent, respectively, in view of framing 3D products by a one-stage polymer-free process. The ceramic matrix was prepared through a reproducible technology, developed for the conversion of marble resources into calcium phosphates (CaP) powders. After the graphene incorporation (by mechanical and ultrasonication mixing) into the CaP matrix, and Luffa-fibers addition, the samples were evaluated in both as-admixed and thermally-treated form (compact/porous products) by complementary structural, morphological, and compositional techniques. The results confirmed the benefits of the two agents’ addition upon the compact products’ micro-porosity and the global mechanical features, inferred by compressive strength and elastic modulus determinations. For the porous products, overall optimal results were obtained at a graphene amount of <1 wt.%. Further, no influence of graphene on fibers’ ability to generate at high temperatures internal interconnected-channels-arrays was depicted. Moreover, its incorporation led to a general preservation of structural composition and stability for both the as-admixed and thermally-treated products. The developed CaP-reinforced structures sustain the premises for prospective non- and load-bearing biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioceramics and Bioactive Glass-Based Materials)
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Article
Considerations and Influencing Parameters in EDS Microanalysis of Biogenic Hydroxyapatite
J. Funct. Biomater. 2020, 11(4), 82; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jfb11040082 - 15 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 940
Abstract
Calcium phosphates (CPs) used as biomaterials have been intensively studied in recent years. In most studies, the determination of the chemical composition is mandatory. Due to the versatility and possibilities of performing qualitative and quantitative compositional analyses, energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) is a [...] Read more.
Calcium phosphates (CPs) used as biomaterials have been intensively studied in recent years. In most studies, the determination of the chemical composition is mandatory. Due to the versatility and possibilities of performing qualitative and quantitative compositional analyses, energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) is a widely used technique in this regard. The range of calcium phosphates is very diverse, the first method of approximating the type of compound being EDS microanalysis, by assessing the atomic Ca/P ratio. The value of this ratio can be influenced by several factors correlated with instrumental parameters and analysed samples. This article highlights the influence of the electron beam acceleration voltage (1 kV–30 kV) and of the particle size of calcium phosphate powders on the EDS analysis results. The characterised powders were obtained from bovine bones heat-treated at 1200 °C for 2 h, which have been ground and granulometrically sorted by mechanical vibration. The granulometric sorting generated three types of samples, with particle sizes < 20 μm, < 40 μm and < 100 μm, respectively. These were morphologically and dimensionally analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compositionally by EDS, after the spectrometer was calibrated with a standard reference material (SRM) from NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology). The results showed that the adjusting of acceleration voltage and of the powder particle size significantly influences the spectrum profile and the results of EDS analyses, which can lead to an erroneous primary identification of the analysed calcium phosphate type. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioceramics and Bioactive Glass-Based Materials)
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Article
Hierarchical Surface Texturing of Hydroxyapatite Ceramics: Influence on the Adhesive Bonding Strength of Polymeric Polycaprolactone
J. Funct. Biomater. 2020, 11(4), 73; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jfb11040073 - 03 Oct 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1368
Abstract
The tailored manipulation of ceramic surfaces gained recent interest to optimize the performance and lifetime of composite materials used as implants. In this work, a hierarchical surface texturing of hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics was developed to improve the poor adhesive bonding strength in hydroxyapatite [...] Read more.
The tailored manipulation of ceramic surfaces gained recent interest to optimize the performance and lifetime of composite materials used as implants. In this work, a hierarchical surface texturing of hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics was developed to improve the poor adhesive bonding strength in hydroxyapatite and polycaprolactone (HAp/PCL) composites. Four different types of periodic surface morphologies (grooves, cylindric pits, linear waves and Gaussian hills) were realized by a ceramic micro-transfer molding technique in the submillimeter range. A subsequent surface roughening and functionalization on a micron to nanometer scale was obtained by two different etchings with hydrochloric and tartaric acid. An ensuing silane coupling with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) enhanced the chemical adhesion between the HAp surface and PCL on the nanometer scale by the formation of dipole–dipole interactions and covalent bonds. The adhesive bonding strengths of the individual and combined surface texturings were investigated by performing single-lap compressive shear tests. All individual texturing types (macro, micro and nano) showed significantly improved HAp/PCL interface strengths compared to the non-textured HAp reference, based on an enhanced mechanical, physical and chemical adhesion. The independent effect mechanisms allow the deliberately hierarchical combination of all texturing types without negative influences. The hierarchical surface-textured HAp showed a 6.5 times higher adhesive bonding strength (7.7 ± 1.5 MPa) than the non-textured reference, proving that surface texturing is an attractive method to optimize the component adhesion in composites for potential medical implants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioceramics and Bioactive Glass-Based Materials)
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Article
Sol-Gel Derived Tertiary Bioactive Glass–Ceramic Nanorods Prepared via Hydrothermal Process and Their Composites with Poly(Vinylpyrrolidone-Co-Vinylsilane)
J. Funct. Biomater. 2020, 11(2), 35; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jfb11020035 - 01 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1716
Abstract
Bioactive glass (BG) nanoparticles have wide applications in bone repair due to their bone-bonding and biodegradable nature. In this work, nanometric rod-shaped ternary SiO2-CaO-P2O5 bioactive glass particles were prepared through sol-gel chemistry followed by a base-induced hydrothermal process [...] Read more.
Bioactive glass (BG) nanoparticles have wide applications in bone repair due to their bone-bonding and biodegradable nature. In this work, nanometric rod-shaped ternary SiO2-CaO-P2O5 bioactive glass particles were prepared through sol-gel chemistry followed by a base-induced hydrothermal process at 130 °C and 170 °C for various times up to 36 h. This facile, low-temperature and surfactant-free hydrothermal process has shown to be capable of producing uniform nanorods and nanowires. One-dimensional growth of nanorods and the characteristics of siloxane bridging networks were dependent on the hydrothermal temperature and time. Hardened bioactive composites were prepared from BG nanorods and cryo-milled poly(vinylpyrrolidone-co-triethoxyvinylsilane) in the presence of ammonium phosphate as potential bone graft biomaterials. Covalent crosslinking has been observed between the organic and inorganic components within these composites. The ultimate compressive strength and modulus values increased with increasing co-polymer content, reaching 27 MPa and 500 MPa respectively with 30% co-polymer incorporation. The materials degraded in a controlled non-linear manner when incubated in phosphate-buffered saline from 6 h to 14 days. Fibroblast cell attachment and spreading on the composite were not as good as the positive control surfaces and suggested that they may require protein coating in order to promote favorable cell interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioceramics and Bioactive Glass-Based Materials)
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