Special Issue "Strength and Conditioning for Team Sports"

A special issue of Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology (ISSN 2411-5142).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 4 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Filipe Manuel Clemente
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, School of Sport and Leisure, 4960-320 Melgaço, Portugal
Interests: football; soccer; match analysis; performance analysis; network analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Supporting sports performance by using strength and conditioning methods has become a very popular topic in different team sports. Although the popularity, not always the implementation of strength and conditioning programmes are adjusted to specific populations (e.g., age-groups; sexes) or implemented considering the congested periods of different team sports. Many questions arise from the daily use of strength and conditioning programmes in team sports as “what is the most appropriate dose?”, “how to define the minimal and maximal dose to obtain the best results?”, “when and how to implement strength and conditioning programmes to not affect the field-based performance?”.All those questions (and others) have been partially explored in the literature, however, no consistent answers can be provided at the moment. Additionally, few studies consider the heterogeneity levels of acute effects and adaptations to a standardized stimulus or how to employ heterogeneous stimulus to achieve the most adequate effect on players. Therefore, strength and conditioning for team sports is still a hot topic and deserves a dedicated special issue that receives and disseminates high-quality original studies, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis. This special is looking for contributions regarding the following topics (but not exclusively): (i) strength and conditioning training interventions in team sports; (ii) dose-response relationships; (iii) acute effects of strength and conditioning programmes; (iv) interactions between adaptations, recovery, dietary and supplementation; and (v) implications of strength and conditioning programmes for performance and injury risk.

Dr. Filipe Manuel Clemente
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • strength training
  • aerobic training
  • power training
  • team sports
  • sports performance
  • recovery
  • dietary
  • injury risk

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Article
Effects of Congested Fixture on Men’s Volleyball Load Demands: Interactions with Sets Played
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2021, 6(2), 53; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jfmk6020053 - 17 Jun 2021
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Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the external load, internal load, and technical efficacy between the first and the second matches (M1 and M2) occurring in congested fixtures (two matches in two days) using the number of sets as a moderating [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to compare the external load, internal load, and technical efficacy between the first and the second matches (M1 and M2) occurring in congested fixtures (two matches in two days) using the number of sets as a moderating factor. An observational analytic research design was adopted. Data from official volleyball matches were collected during the first competitive period of the championship, comprising 14 competitive games within 10 weeks. Ten male elite volleyball athletes (age: 21.7 ± 4.19 years of age; experience: 6.2 ± 3.8 years; body mass: 85.7 ± 8.69 kg; height: 192.4 ± 6.25 cm; BMI: 23.1 ± 1.40 kg/m2) participated in this study. Players were monitored for external load (number of jumps and height of jumps) and internal load (using the rate of perceived exertion—RPE). Additionally, notational analysis collected information about attack efficacy and receptions made during matches. The mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction between time (M1 vs. M2) and number of sets for number of jumps per minute (p = 0.235; ηp2 = 0.114), mean jump height (p = 0.076; ηp2 = 0.193), RPE (p = 0.261; ηp2 = 0.106), attack efficacy (p = 0.346; ηp2 = 0.085), Positive reception (p = 0.980; ηp2 = 0.002) and Perfect reception (p = 0.762; ηp2 = 0.022). In conclusion, congested fixtures do not seem to affect the performance of volleyball players negatively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strength and Conditioning for Team Sports)
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Review

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Review
Stretching for Recovery from Groin Pain or Injury in Athletes: A Critical and Systematic Review
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2021, 6(3), 73; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jfmk6030073 - 30 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Stretching is usually used as part of rehabilitation protocols for groin pain or injury, but its specific contribution to and within multimodal recovery protocols is unclear. Our goal was to systematically review the effects of stretching for the recovery from groin pain or [...] Read more.
Stretching is usually used as part of rehabilitation protocols for groin pain or injury, but its specific contribution to and within multimodal recovery protocols is unclear. Our goal was to systematically review the effects of stretching for the recovery from groin pain or injury. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed, with eligibility criteria defined according to PICOS: (Participants) athletes with groin pain or injuries; (Interventions) interventions with stretching as the differentiating factor; (Comparators) comparators not applying stretching; (Outcomes) symptom remission or improvement and/or time to return to sport and/or return to play; (Study design) randomized controlled trials. Searches were performed on 26 March 2021, in CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EBSCO, EMBASE, PEDro, PubMed, Scielo, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and Web of Science, with no limitations regarding language or date, and no filters. Of 117 retrieved results, 65 were duplicates and 49 were excluded at the screening stage. The three articles eligible for full-text analysis failed to comply with one or more inclusion criteria (participants, intervention and/or comparators). We then went beyond the protocol and searched for non-randomized trials and case series, but no intervention was found where stretching was the differentiating factor. We found no trials specifically assessing the effects of stretching on recovery or improvement of groin pain or injury in athletes. Currently, the efficacy of these interventions is unknown, and more research is warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strength and Conditioning for Team Sports)
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