Special Issue "Climate-Smart Agriculture and Rural Sustainability"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land–Climate Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mária Szalmáné Csete
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Economics, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Műegyetem rkp. 3., 1111 Budapest, Hungary
Interests: sustainability management; climate change and sustainability; regional and sectoral adaptation and mitigation strategies; IoT and sustainability; climate-smart agriculture; smart cities and sustainable urban development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Monica Salvia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CNR-IMAA, National Research Council of Italy, Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis, 7-00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: energy systems analysis and models development; climate change mitigation strategies; rational use of energy; renewable energy sources; technology support and capacity building for local governments; smart cities
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The agricultural sector is extremely vulnerable to the increasing effects of climate change, which poses new challenges for agriculture. Land–climate interactions, especially focusing on the possibilities related to climate-smart land management and smart rural development, can play a pivotal role in fostering the transition toward sustainability.

The main aim of this Special Issue is to provide an overview to enhance research oriented toward climate-smart agriculture (CSA) and to share recent results, solutions, and novel ways related to case studies at both global and local levels, focusing on the financing mechanism of CSA projects, technical aspects, scaling issues, effectiveness and sustainability perspectives.

In the case of CSA activities, it is pivotal to reveal the synergies among the three pillars of CSA (productivity, adaptation, and mitigation) to foster practical implementations and to move towards sustainable agriculture systems. There is outstanding potential in developing CSA tools to create sustainable agriculture, as it can support global climate policy goals and improve sectoral and regional resilience in accordance with green economic development issues and the digital transition.

The target audience of this Special Issue includes both academic researchers and practitioners.

Dr. Mária Szalmáné Csete
Dr. Monica Salvia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land–climate interactions
  • climate-smart agriculture
  • climate-smart land management
  • financing mechanism
  • effectiveness
  • scaling
  • productivity
  • mitigation
  • adaptation
  • sustainable development goals

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Preferences in Farmland Eco-Compensation Methods: A Case Study of Wuhan, China
Land 2021, 10(11), 1159; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/land10111159 - 29 Oct 2021
Viewed by 284
Abstract
Successful farmland eco-compensation projects need to reflect the heterogeneous preferences both from suppliers and beneficiaries. This paper tries to answer this question by investigating both citizen and farmer preferences for different farmland eco-compensation methods in Wuhan, China, and explore some of the socio-demographic [...] Read more.
Successful farmland eco-compensation projects need to reflect the heterogeneous preferences both from suppliers and beneficiaries. This paper tries to answer this question by investigating both citizen and farmer preferences for different farmland eco-compensation methods in Wuhan, China, and explore some of the socio-demographic characteristics that contribute to their preferences. Based on the data of 288 citizens and 331 farmers, the multinomial logit model was employed to analyze their preferences for the four farmland eco-compensation methods (monetary compensation, in-kind compensation, technology compensation and policy compensation), respectively. The results show that: (1) Monetary compensation is the most welcomed farmland eco-compensation method among both citizens and farmers. (2) Despite farmers and citizens both putting a high value on monetary compensation methods, citizens are more likely to provide compensation methods that can help farmers improve their living standards in a sustainable method (in-kind compensation, technology compensation and policy compensation). Farmers are less likely to choose the in-kind compensation method. (3) The preference for farmland eco-compensation systems of farmers and citizens are influenced by different socio-demographic characteristics. The results can help the government to design more aimed farmland eco-compensation methods for farmers with different socio-demographic characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate-Smart Agriculture and Rural Sustainability)
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Article
Land Reform in the Era of Global Warming—Can Land Reforms Help Agriculture Be Climate-Smart?
Land 2020, 9(12), 471; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/land9120471 - 24 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1535
Abstract
In an era of global warming, long-standing challenges for rural populations, including land inequality, poverty and food insecurity, risk being exacerbated by the effects of climate change. Innovative and effective approaches, such as Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA), are required to alleviate these environmental [...] Read more.
In an era of global warming, long-standing challenges for rural populations, including land inequality, poverty and food insecurity, risk being exacerbated by the effects of climate change. Innovative and effective approaches, such as Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA), are required to alleviate these environmental pressures without hampering efficiency. In countries with unequal distribution of land, where issues of access to and use of land rank high on the policy agenda, policymakers are confronted with the challenge of implementing interventions such as land reforms, whilst endeavouring to ensure that sustainable agriculture approaches be adopted by farm-households. The aim of this study is to investigate how land reforms can provide an opportunity for policymakers, particularly in lower-income countries, to enhance not only equity and efficiency but also environmental sustainability. In particular, this study builds on an extensive review of the theoretical and empirical literature and employs a conceptual framework analysis method to develop and describe a framework that explores how land reforms can be associated with the CSA approach. The resultant “Climate Smart Land Reform” (CSLR) framework contains four driving pillars, namely land redistribution, tenure reform, rural advisory services and markets and infrastructure. The framework disentangles relevant channels through which land reform, via its four pillars, can foster CSA adoption and thus contribute to the attainment of sustainable increases in agricultural productivity, climate change adaptation and climate change mitigation. The framework also includes relevant channels through which more ‘traditional’ objectives of land reformers, including economic, social and political objectives, can be achieved. In turn, the (partial) attainment of such objectives would lead to improvements in agroecological and socioeconomic conditions of rural areas and populations. These improvements are considered within the framework as the ‘ultimate’ objective of land reformers. The CSLR framework represents an innovative way of conceptualising how land reforms can generate beneficial effects not only in terms of equity and efficiency but also of environmental sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate-Smart Agriculture and Rural Sustainability)
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Review

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Review
Agrivoltaics: A Climate-Smart Agriculture Approach for Indian Farmers
Land 2021, 10(11), 1277; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/land10111277 - 20 Nov 2021
Viewed by 299
Abstract
India is a leader when it comes to agriculture. A significant part of the country’s population depends on agriculture for livelihood. However, many of them face challenges due to using unreliable farming techniques. Sometimes the challenges increase to the extent that they commit [...] Read more.
India is a leader when it comes to agriculture. A significant part of the country’s population depends on agriculture for livelihood. However, many of them face challenges due to using unreliable farming techniques. Sometimes the challenges increase to the extent that they commit suicide. Besides, India is highly populated, and its population is steadily increasing, requiring its government to grow its GDP and increase its energy supply proportionately. This paper reviews integrating solar farming with agriculture, known as Agrivoltaics, as a Climate-Smart Agriculture (CSA) option for Indian farmers. This study is further supported by the Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis of agrivoltaics. Using the SWOT analysis, this article presents how agrivoltaics can make agriculture sustainable and reliable. This paper identifies rural electrification, water conservation, yield improvement, sustainable income generation, and reduction in the usage of pesticides as the strengths of agrivoltaics. Similarly, the paper presents weaknesses, opportunities, and threats to agrivoltaics in India. The research concludes with the findings that agrivoltaics have the potential of meeting multiple objectives such as meeting global commitments, offering employment, providing economic stability, increasing clean energy production capacity, conserving natural resources, and succeeding in several others. The paper also includes a discussion about the findings, suggestions, and implications of adopting agrivoltaics on a large scale in India. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate-Smart Agriculture and Rural Sustainability)
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