Special Issue "Feature Papers for Landscape Ecology Section"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Landscape Ecology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 December 2022 | Viewed by 1963

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Javier Martínez-López
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Ecology Department, Facultad de Ciencias - Campus de Fuentenueva, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: landscape ecology; remote sensing; ecosystem services; environmental modelling; climate change
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Alejandro Rescia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biodiversity, Ecology and Evolution, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Complutense University of Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: landscape ecology; biological diversity; ecosystem services; spatial resilience; socio-ecological sustainability; agricultural landscapes
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Prof. Dr. Robert Baldwin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Forestry and Environmental Conservation Department, 261 Lehotsky Hall, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA
Interests: biodiversity; landscape-scale conservation planning; wetland landscapes; habitat connectivity
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Prof. Dr. Diane Pearson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Agriculture and Environment, College of Sciences, Massey University, 4442 Palmerston North, New Zealand
Interests: sustainable landscape management; landscape ecology; environmental management; land system change; land use; GIS; environmental change; participatory research; co-production of knowledge; landscape planning and design and landscape function
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Dr. Guillermo J. Martinez-Pastur
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina
2. Laboratorio de Recursos Agroforestales, Centro Austral de Investigaciones Científicas (CADIC), Houssay 200 (9410) Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina
Interests: forest management and biodiversity conservation in native forests of South Patagonia; development of new silviculture; including the variable retention of elements in the managed areas to promote the conservation of endangered species

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Landscape ecology is the science of studying and improving relationships between ecological environmental processes and particular ecosystems within a variety of landscape scales and organizational levels of research and policy. Landscapes are spatially heterogeneous geographic areas characterized by diverse interacting patches or ecosystems, ranging from relatively natural terrestrial and aquatic systems to human-dominated environments such as agricultural and urban settings. Landscape ecology predominantly focuses on the relationship surrounding pattern, process and scale, which often needs coupling between biophysical and socioeconomic sciences. Landscape Ecology specifically seeks to integrate human activities influencing pattern and process, and also provide information that is helpful for land use planning.

This Special Issue aims to tackle complex problems related to landscape ecology from a broad perspective, and will address issues such as ecosystem services assessment, integrated catchment management, protected area monitoring and management, connectivity assessment, land use and land cover change, the relationship between landscape pattern analysis and ecological processes, spatial resilience to disturbances, changes in spatial structure, landscapes as socio-ecological systems, etc.

This Special Issue seeks contributions concerning the dynamics of patterns and processes at landscape scales related to any land use or land cover type, including aquatic and marine systems. Manuscripts can be original research articles covering theory and applications, or "state of the science" reviews, but should explicitly address scale. Interdisciplinary manuscripts are particularly welcome, as are manuscripts from fields adjacent to landscape ecology, such as geography, macroecology, agriculture and biological diversity.

Prof. Dr. Javier Martínez-López
Prof. Dr. Alejandro Rescia
Prof. Dr. Robert Baldwin
Prof. Dr. Diane Pearson
Dr. Guillermo Martinez-Pastur
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • landscape ecology
  • remote sensing
  • land use and land cover change
  • ecological processes
  • connectivity assessment
  • landscape services
  • agricultural landscapes
  • spatial resilience
  • biological diversity
  • global change

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Impact of Future Development Scenario Selection on Landscape Ecological Risk in the Chengdu-Chongqing Economic Zone
Land 2022, 11(7), 964; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/land11070964 - 23 Jun 2022
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Abstract
The management of regional eco-environmental risks is the key to promoting regional economic sustainability from the macro level, and accurate evaluation of the evolutionary trends of regional ecological risk in the future is of high importance. In order to clearly identify the possible [...] Read more.
The management of regional eco-environmental risks is the key to promoting regional economic sustainability from the macro level, and accurate evaluation of the evolutionary trends of regional ecological risk in the future is of high importance. In order to clearly identify the possible impact of future development scenario selection for the Chengdu-Chongqing Economic Zone (C-C E Zone) on the evolution of landscape ecological risk (LER), we introduced the Patch-generating Land Use Simulation (PLUS) model to simulate land use data for the C-C E Zone from 2030 to 2050 for two scenarios: natural development (ND) and ecological protection (EP). Based on the ecological grid and landscape ecological risk index (LERI) model, the landscape ecological risk (LER) evolutionary trends seen in the C-C E Zone from 2000 to 2050 were analyzed and identified. The results showed that: (1) The PLUS model can obtain high-precision simulation results in the C-C E Zone. In the future, the currently increasing rate of land being used for construction will be reduced, the declining rates of forest and cultivated land area will also be reduced, and the amount of land being used for various purposes will remain stable going into the future. (2) This study found that the optimal size of the ecological grid in the LERI calculation of the mountainous area was 4 × 4 km. Additionally, the mean values of the LERI in 2030, 2040, and 2050 were 0.1612, 0.1628, and 0.1636 for ND and 0.1612, 0.1618, and 0.1620 for EP. (3) The hot spot analysis results showed that an area of about 49,700 km2 in the C-C E Zone from 2000 to 2050 belongs to high agglomeration of LER. (4) Since 2010, the proportions of high and extremely high risk levels have continued to increase, but under the EP scenario, the high and extremely high risk levels in 2040 and 2050 decreased from 14.36% and 6.66% to 14.33% and 6.43%. Regional analysis showed that the high and extremely high risk levels in most regions increased over 2010–2050. (5) Under the ND scenario, the proportions of grids with decreased, unchanged, and increased risk levels were 15.13%, 81.48%, and 3.39% for 2000–2010 and 0.54%, 94.75%, and 4.71% for 2040–2050. These trends indicated that the proportion of grids with changed risk levels gradually decreased going into the future. This study analyzed the evolutionary trends of LER at the C-C E Zone for the ND and EP scenario. On the whole, the LER for the C-C E Zone showed an upward trend, and the EP scenario was conducive to reducing the risk. These research results can serve as a valuable data reference set for regional landscape optimization and risk prevention and control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Landscape Ecology Section)
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Article
Albedo-Induced Global Warming Impact at Multiple Temporal Scales within an Upper Midwest USA Watershed
Land 2022, 11(2), 283; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/land11020283 - 13 Feb 2022
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Abstract
Land surface albedo is a significant regulator of climate. Changes in land use worldwide have greatly reshaped landscapes in the recent decades. Deforestation, agricultural development, and urban expansion alter land surface albedo, each with unique influences on shortwave radiative forcing and global warming [...] Read more.
Land surface albedo is a significant regulator of climate. Changes in land use worldwide have greatly reshaped landscapes in the recent decades. Deforestation, agricultural development, and urban expansion alter land surface albedo, each with unique influences on shortwave radiative forcing and global warming impact (GWI). Here, we characterize the changes in landscape albedo-induced GWI (GWIΔα) at multiple temporal scales, with a special focus on the seasonal and monthly GWIΔα over a 19-year period for different land cover types in five ecoregions within a watershed in the upper Midwest USA. The results show that land cover changes from the original forest exhibited a net cooling effect, with contributions of annual GWIΔα varying by cover type and ecoregion. Seasonal and monthly variations of the GWIΔα showed unique trends over the 19-year period and contributed differently to the total GWIΔα. Cropland contributed most to cooling the local climate, with seasonal and monthly offsets of 18% and 83%, respectively, of the annual greenhouse gas emissions of maize fields in the same area. Urban areas exhibited both cooling and warming effects. Cropland and urban areas showed significantly different seasonal GWIΔα at some ecoregions. The landscape composition of the five ecoregions could cause different net landscape GWIΔα. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Landscape Ecology Section)
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Article
Coupling Coordination Analysis and Prediction of Landscape Ecological Risks and Ecosystem Services in the Min River Basin
Land 2022, 11(2), 222; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/land11020222 - 02 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 585
Abstract
Watershed landscape ecological security and ecosystem service functions are the material basis and environmental guarantee for promoting socioeconomic development. Analyzing the spatiotemporal characteristics of landscape ecological risks (LERs) and ecosystem services (ESs) and exploring the coupling coordination relationship between the two are of [...] Read more.
Watershed landscape ecological security and ecosystem service functions are the material basis and environmental guarantee for promoting socioeconomic development. Analyzing the spatiotemporal characteristics of landscape ecological risks (LERs) and ecosystem services (ESs) and exploring the coupling coordination relationship between the two are of great significance for promoting the construction of ecological civilization and achieving sustainable development in the watershed. With the Min River Basin as the study area, the landscape ecological risk assessment, Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST), and Carnegie Ames–Stanford Approach (CASA) models were used to evaluate the LERs and ESs based on the shared socioeconomic pathways (SSPs), and the patch-generating land use simulation (PLUS) model was used to predict the land use distribution of the Min River Basin in 2030. On this basis, the coupling coordination degree model was used to explore the coupling coordination relationship between the LERs and ESs. The results show that, from 2000 to 2020, the LER of the Min River Basin gradually decreased, and the overall spatial distribution pattern was “high in the north and low in the south”. The ES of the Min River Basin initially decreased and then increased, showing a spatial distribution pattern of “low in the south and high in the north”. Among the SSPs in 2030, the LER is the largest under the SSP3 scenario and the smallest under the SSP4 scenario. The ES improvement is the most significant under the SSP1 scenario and the lowest under the SSP3 scenario. From 2000 to 2030, the coupling coordination degree of the Min River Basin first decreased and then increased, showing a spatial distribution pattern of “high in the south and low in the north”. Among the five SSPs, the coupling coordination degree was the highest under SSP1. The spatial distribution of urban area is the main driving factor affecting the coupling coordination relationship between the LER and ES, and the development of social and economy is the beginning of landscape pattern optimization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Landscape Ecology Section)
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