Special Issue "Preservation, Reuse and Reveal of Cultural Heritage through Sustainable Land Management, Rural and Urban Development"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land Socio-Economic and Political Issues".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Antonia Moropoulou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science & Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytechniou str, 15773 Athens, Greece
Interests: cutural heritage; building materials; non destructive testing; sustainable development; circular economy; development schemes; environmental management; gis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Charalabos Ioannidis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Photogrammetry, School of Rural, Surveying and Geoinformatics Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytechniou str., 15773 Athens, Greece
Interests: cultural heritage geometric documentation; HBIM; multi-dimensional modelling; city modelling; change detection; data fusion; photogrammetry; land management
Dr. Ekaterini Delegou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science & Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytechniou str, 15773 Athens, Greece
Interests: cutural heritage; building materials; non destructive testing; sustainable development; environmental management; gis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cultural heritage contributes considerably to promoting economic, social and territory cohesion, as it enhances locals’ identity and appreciation for their land and its history.

However, cultural heritage is exposed to multiple risks due to ageing, adverse environmental conditions, and human pressure. As the environmental crisis is emphasized by intense climatic changes and extreme natural hazards, new demands on preservation strategies arise to remediate and prevent damage on cultural heritage. At the same time, and despite cultural tourism is acknowledged and is being promoted over the last decades as a regional and national development tool by many countries, it has recently been transformed to overtourism at several cases. In contrast, there are urban or rural areas, unable to assure a satisfactory standard of living for their population, facing underdevelopment and population decrease, even if these areas are rich in cultural reserve.

To diminish these kinds of inequalities within urban matrices and/or regions, innovative methodologies and successfully applied expertise strategies are required, especially nowadays where technological advances in Remote sensing/GIS tools can be a significant support.

Cultural heritage can be used as a growth pole for underdeveloped areas, whereas in overdeveloped areas alteration of socio-spatial patterns can lead to the improvement of cultural sites safeguarding and locals’ life quality. Whatever the case is, the principles of sustainability and circular economy can play a key role on land management and urban/rural development for achieving the goals of revitalization and balanced economic growth.

Accordingly, this special issue aims to contribute to the literature of “the nexus: cultural heritage preservation – sustainable urban/rural land management - local society enhancement - economic growth”, to shed light on this multi-variant and complex scientific area, suggesting viable and novel resolving strategies.

Prof. Dr. Antonia Moropoulou
Prof. Dr. Charalabos Ioannidis
Dr. Ekaterini Delegou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable development
  • remote sensing
  • 3D modeling
  • spatial planning
  • GIS/HBIM
  • cultural routes
  • tangible/intangible cultural heritage
  • historical settlements
  • historical cities
  • circular economy
  • cultural tourism
  • environmental management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Article
Abandoned or Degraded Areas in Historic Cities: The Importance of Multifunctional Reuse for Development through the Example of the Historic Commercial Triangle (Emporiko Trigono) of Athens
Land 2022, 11(1), 114; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/land11010114 - 11 Jan 2022
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Abstract
This article investigates the problem of changing land uses in historical city centers, a problem which often leads to the alteration of their historical, architectural and functional physiognomy, as well as the loss of their inhabitants. It also discusses the importance of land [...] Read more.
This article investigates the problem of changing land uses in historical city centers, a problem which often leads to the alteration of their historical, architectural and functional physiognomy, as well as the loss of their inhabitants. It also discusses the importance of land management and proposes a multifunctional reuse model for sustainable development in abandoned or degraded areas in historic cities. This problem is found in historical centers nowadays, especially in the European South, and many theoretical texts and urban studies deal with the issue. Taking under consideration the case of the Historical “Commercial Triangle” of Athens, this article presents the results of an extensive field work, which led to the mapping and analysis of the neighborhood’s special identity. Subsequently, these results lead to the presentation of the problems caused by the dominating uses of recreation and tourism, which suppress the traditional existing commercial uses and the residency. It concludes by proposing preservation strategies for the reuse and development of the area and emphasizes the importance of a management plan aiming towards the preservation of the historical character of the commercial center and its sustainable development. The work presented in this paper is based on an assignment produced in 2020 for the purposes of the post-graduate course “Protection and Preservation of a historical urban center or settlement”, which is part of the post-graduate program “Protection of Monuments” in the School of Architecture, NTUA. Full article
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Article
Protection and Revealing of Traditional Settlements and Cultural Assets, as a Tool for Sustainable Development: The Case of Kythera Island in Greece
Land 2021, 10(12), 1324; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/land10121324 - 01 Dec 2021
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Abstract
Preserving and highlighting cultural heritage is directly related to sustainable development. The adaptive reuse of cultural heritage buildings and traditional settlements can be a core issue in the implementation of a circular economy strategy, especially in remote areas. In this framework, the current [...] Read more.
Preserving and highlighting cultural heritage is directly related to sustainable development. The adaptive reuse of cultural heritage buildings and traditional settlements can be a core issue in the implementation of a circular economy strategy, especially in remote areas. In this framework, the current study focuses on Kythera, an isolated Greek island. For the analysis of the study area, research in local archives and communication with the municipality and local stakeholders was conducted, while questionnaires addressed to Kythera’s residents and visitors were developed and processed. Thus, both the special features of the island and the needs of the local community were identified, leading to the proposal of three adaptive reuse schemes at a different scale and within a different management model. The first scheme is focused on the institution of “Eghorios Periousia” and proposes the adaptive reuse of the island’s English Schools as focal points for the promotion of Kythera’s identity. The second scheme focuses on the smaller declared traditional settlements and proposes the adaptive reuse of their housing stock as an affordable permanent residence solution. The third scheme focuses on the abandoned neighborhood of Mavrogiorgiannika in the traditional settlement of Karavas and proposes its adaptive reuse as agritourism accommodation facilities. Full article
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Narrative-Based Nature of Heritage: Between Myth and Discourses: Case of Šiluva Place-Making in Progress
Land 2022, 11(1), 47; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/land11010047 - 29 Dec 2021
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Abstract
The article focuses on the phenomenon of myth, which cannot be seen and may not even exist based on empirical evidence, although it can function as a long-lasting wave inceptor, as demonstrated in numerous cases in history. The singular presence of myth has [...] Read more.
The article focuses on the phenomenon of myth, which cannot be seen and may not even exist based on empirical evidence, although it can function as a long-lasting wave inceptor, as demonstrated in numerous cases in history. The singular presence of myth has no linear time, and the way to approach the concealed mythic meaning that is beyond tales, oral traditions or ritual practices is based on language and narrative. Narrative is how myth manifests itself in the temporal layers of discourse through collective decision-making processes within cultures and in places. The urban cultural heritage seems to be a promising source of understanding of what sort of narrative history has been telling. We emphasize that the closest possible approach to the permanence of myth lies in this subtle between-epoch or between-generational moment wherein the discourse alters. The hermeneutics of repetition within alteration processes is what could be called the narrative of cultural heritage in towns and cities. Development of the physical heritage properties has been touched by a variety of agents, and therefore it must have gathered a nearly unlimited amount of explicit and implicit knowledge. The research further demonstrates how the myth–narrative–discourse interaction affects our understanding of the authenticity of heritage objects, shifting towards a permanent pervading authenticity which could be intensive or extensive in the tangible realm. The case of Šiluva is discussed in order to explain how myth can be used practically in placemaking. Full article
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