Special Issue "Environmental, Ecological and Food Resources in the Biodiversity Overview: Health Benefits"

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Ecology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alessandra Durazzo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CREA-Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, Via Ardeatina 546, 00178 Rome, Italy
Interests: natural products; bioactive compounds; antioxidants; food quality; nutrition; food composition databases; dietary supplements; herbs; botanicals; natural substances databases; synthesis; bioavailability, metabolic pathways
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Massimo Lucarini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CREA-Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, Via Ardeatina 546, 00178 Rome, Italy
Interests: food quality; bioactive compounds; antioxidants; nutrition; metabolism; foods; biodiversity; sustainability; bioavailability; beverages; meat; biorefinery; vegetable; fish; fibre; fatty acids; milk; cereals; food composition database; natural product
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Classification, cataloguing and analysis of environmental, agricultural, ecological, botanical and food resources from native species to unconventional sources and wastes should be promoted in the perspective of biodiversity. Studies on botanical classification, optimization of diversity of species, and monitoring the biochemistry of wild species, intra-species biodiversity, or environmental influences, and their effects on food qualities and health benefits are welcome. Studies on the impact of biodiverse environment in food production and nutrition should be promoted: exploitation and promotion of wild and native foods in the perspective of responsible human consumption and health outcomes. Management and modelling environment and biodiversity data are encouraged. Studies addressing to the promotion of diversities, to building synergies throughout food, nutrition and health systems and sharing of knowledge.

The production of food composition data for nutrients and biologically active compounds as well as the definition of new biomarkers represent key determinants in understanding the linkage and crosslinks between food, environment, nutrition and health. Studies on mapping diversity of food products and consumer preferences are welcome.

Developments, management, applications and utilizations of agricultural, ecological, botanical, food and environmental resources from environmental to nutritional- and health- related fields are here explored. Current research trends are defined.

Dr. Alessandra Durazzo
Dr. Massimo Lucarini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental, ecological, food resource
  • cataloguing
  • environment data
  • botanical data
  • food data
  • nutrients
  • natural substances
  • classification
  • categorization
  • applications and benefits
  • biomedicine and health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Environmental, Ecological and Food Resources in the Biodiversity Overview: Health Benefits
Life 2021, 11(11), 1228; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/life11111228 - 13 Nov 2021
Viewed by 278
Abstract
The Special Issue “Environmental, Ecological and Food Resources in the Biodiversity Overview: Health Benefits” wants to underline the importance of classification, cataloguing and analysis of environmental, agricultural, ecological, botanical and food sources—from native species to unconventional sources and wastes—which should be promoted from [...] Read more.
The Special Issue “Environmental, Ecological and Food Resources in the Biodiversity Overview: Health Benefits” wants to underline the importance of classification, cataloguing and analysis of environmental, agricultural, ecological, botanical and food sources—from native species to unconventional sources and wastes—which should be promoted from the perspectives of biodiversity and sustainability [...] Full article

Research

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Article
Land-Use Impact on Stand Structure and Fruit Yield of Tamarindus indica L. in the Drylands of Southeastern Ethiopia
Life 2021, 11(5), 408; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/life11050408 - 30 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 516
Abstract
In this study, we evaluated stand status, dendrometric variables, and fruit production of Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) trees growing in bushland and farmland-use types in dryland areas of Ethiopia. The vegetation survey was conducted using the point-centered quarter method. The fruit yield [...] Read more.
In this study, we evaluated stand status, dendrometric variables, and fruit production of Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) trees growing in bushland and farmland-use types in dryland areas of Ethiopia. The vegetation survey was conducted using the point-centered quarter method. The fruit yield of 54 trees was also evaluated. Tree density and fruit production in ha were estimated. There was a significant difference in Tamarind tree density between the two land-use types (p = 0.01). The mean fruit yield of farmland trees was significantly higher than that of bushland trees. However, Tamarind has unsustainable structure on farmlands. Differences in the dendrometric characteristics of trees were also observed between the two land-use types. Predictive models were selected for Tamarind fruit yield estimations in both land-use types. Although the majority of farmland trees produced <5000 fruit year−1, the selection of Tamarind germplasm in its natural ranges could improve production. Thus, the development of management plans to establish stands that have a more balanced diameter structure and thereby ensure continuity of the population and fruit yields is required in this area, particularly in the farmlands. This baseline information could assist elsewhere in areas that are facing similar challenges for the species due to land-use change. Full article
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Other

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Perspective
Bee Products: A Representation of Biodiversity, Sustainability, and Health
Life 2021, 11(9), 970; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/life11090970 - 15 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 696
Abstract
Biodiversity strengthens the productivity of any ecosystem (agricultural land, forest, lake, etc.). The loss of biodiversity contributes to food and energy insecurity; increases vulnerability to natural disasters, such as floods or tropical storms; and decreases the quality of both life and health. Wild [...] Read more.
Biodiversity strengthens the productivity of any ecosystem (agricultural land, forest, lake, etc.). The loss of biodiversity contributes to food and energy insecurity; increases vulnerability to natural disasters, such as floods or tropical storms; and decreases the quality of both life and health. Wild and managed bees play a key role in maintaining the biodiversity and in the recovery and restoration of degraded habitats. The novelty character of this perspective is to give an updated representation of bee products’ biodiversity, sustainability, and health relationship. The role of bees as bioindicators, their importance in the conservation of biodiversity, their ecosystem services, and the variety of the bee products are described herein. An overview of the main components of bee products, their biological potentials, and health is highlighted and detailed as follows: (i) nutritional value of bee products, (ii) bioactive profile of bee products and the related beneficial properties; (iii) focus on honey and health through a literature quantitative analysis, and (iv) bee products explored through databases. Moreover, as an example of the interconnection between health, biodiversity, and sustainability, a case study, namely the “Cellulose Park”, realized in Rome (Italy), is presented here. This case study highlights how bee activities can be used to assess and track changes in the quality of agricultural ecosystems—hive products could be valid indicators of the quality and health of the surrounding environment, as well as the changes induced by the biotic and abiotic factors that impact the sustainability of agricultural production and biodiversity conservation in peri-urban areas. Full article
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