Special Issue "Estrogen-Dependent Diseases: Endometriosis"

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1648-9144).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Simone Ferrero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, University of Genova, Largo R Benzi 10, I-16132 Genoa, Italy
Interests: gynecology; endometriosis; fibroids; laparoscopy; hormonal therapy; hysteroscopy; ultrasonography; gynecological surgery; minimally invasive surgery; infertility
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Endometriosis affects 4–10% of reproductive age women, causing pain symptoms and infertility. Endometriosis-related pain severely affects quality of life, impairing working efficiency, social life and sexual function. Although research has improved our knowledge of the genetic and molecular pathways involved in the establishment and progression of endometriosis, the pathogenesis of this condition remains to be fully understood.

Given the growing importance of endometriosis in the clinical practice of gynaecologists, radiologists, colorectal surgeons, urologists and general practitioners, the journal Medicina is launching a Special Issue entitled “Estrogen-Dependent Diseases: Endometriosis” with the aim of gathering accurate and up-to-date scientific information on all aspects of this condition. We are pleased to invite you and your co-workers to submit your original research articles reporting the findings of your basic research studies performed on endometriosis. We also encourage the submission of original manuscripts on the diagnosis of endometriosis and on the treatment of pain and infertility in patients with endometriosis. Furthermore, we would like to invite you to submit review articles aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in the diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatment of endometriosis.

Prof. Simone Ferrero
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • endometriosis
  • diagnosis
  • bowel endometriosis
  • ureteral endometriosis
  • bladder endometriosis
  • endometrioma
  • infertility
  • assisted reproductive technologies
  • laparoscopy
  • surgery

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Impact of Endometriomas and Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis on Pregnancy Outcomes and on First and Second Trimester Markers of Impaired Placentation
Medicina 2019, 55(9), 550; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicina55090550 - 30 Aug 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 918
Abstract
Background and objective: Previous studies did not draw a definitive conclusion about the influence of the role of deep endometriosis (DE) and ovarian endometrioma (OE) as risk factor for developing adverse perinatal outcomes in patients affected by endometriosis. This study aimed to [...] Read more.
Background and objective: Previous studies did not draw a definitive conclusion about the influence of the role of deep endometriosis (DE) and ovarian endometrioma (OE) as risk factor for developing adverse perinatal outcomes in patients affected by endometriosis. This study aimed to investigate if adverse fetal and maternal outcomes, and in particular the incidence of small for gestational age (SGA) infants, are different in pregnant women with OE versus pregnant women with DE without OE. Material and methods: This study was based on a retrospective analysis of a database collected prospectively. The population included in the study was divided into three groups: patients with OE, patients with DE without concomitant OE, and patients without endometriosis (controls). The controls were matched on the basis of age and parity. Demographic data at baseline and pregnancy outcomes were recorded. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in first trimester levels of PAPP-A, first and mid-pregnancy trimester mean Uterine Artery Doppler pulsatile index, estimated fetal weight centile, and SGA fetuses’ prevalence for patients with OE, and those with DE without OE in comparison to health women; moreover, there was no statistically significant difference with regard to SGA birth prevalence, prevalence of preeclampsia, and five-minute Apgar score between these three groups. Conclusions: The specific presence of OE or DE in pregnant women does not seem to be associated with an increased risk of delivering an SGA infant. These data seem to suggest that patients with endometriosis should be treated in pregnancy as the general population, thus not needing a closer monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Estrogen-Dependent Diseases: Endometriosis)
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Article
Validation of Laser Capture Microdissection Protocol in Endometriosis Studies
Medicina 2019, 55(9), 520; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicina55090520 - 22 Aug 2019
Viewed by 952
Abstract
Background and Objectives: The presence of endometrial-like tissue outside the uterine cavity is a key feature of endometriosis. Although endometriotic lesions appear to be histologically quite similar to the eutopic endometrium, detailed studies comparing both tissues are required because their inner and surrounding [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: The presence of endometrial-like tissue outside the uterine cavity is a key feature of endometriosis. Although endometriotic lesions appear to be histologically quite similar to the eutopic endometrium, detailed studies comparing both tissues are required because their inner and surrounding cellular arrangement is distinct. Thus, comparison between tissues might require methods, such as laser capture microdissection (LCM), that allow for precise selection of an area and its specific cell populations. However, it is known that the efficient use of LCM depends on the type of studied tissue and on the choice of an adequate protocol. Recent studies have reported the use of LCM in endometriosis studies. The main objective of the present study is to establish a standardized protocol to obtain good-quality microdissected material from eutopic or ectopic endometrium. Materials and Methods: The main methodological steps involved in the processing of the lesion samples for LCM were standardized to yield material of good quality to be further used in molecular techniques. Results: We obtained satisfactory results regarding the yields and integrity of RNA and protein obtained from LCM-processed endometriosis tissues. Conclusion: LCM can provide more precise analysis of endometriosis biopsies, provided that key steps of the methodology are followed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Estrogen-Dependent Diseases: Endometriosis)
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