Special Issue "Updates on Naturopathic and Osteopathic Medicines: The Coming of Age of Age-Old Remedies"

A special issue of Medicines (ISSN 2305-6320).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Debasis Mondal
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Guest Editor
Associate Professor of Microbiology & Infectious Disease, Lincoln Memorial University—Debusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, 9737 Cogdill Road, Knoxville, TN 37932, USA
Interests: microbiology; cancer; diagnostics; therapeutics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Syed Siraj A. Quadri
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Guest Editor
Associate Professor of Pharmacology, Lincoln Memorial University—Debusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, 9737 Cogdill Road, Knoxville, TN 37932, USA
Interests: pharmacology; cardiovascular disease; therapy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

The initial promise of targeted pharmaceutical agents (i.e., allopathic medicines) for the treatment of chronic diseases has been significantly dampened, primarily due to their side effects and ultimate lack of therapeutic success.  In this respect, recent years have documented the benefits of safer approaches to the treatment of chronic diseases, e.g., naturopathic and osteopathic medicines. However, despite their promise, neither osteopathic nor naturopathic treatment modalities have become a part of mainstream medicine. The underlying principle of both these therapeutic strategies is the suppression of inflammation and oxidative stress, conditions frequently associated with the progression of many chronic diseases.  The anti-inflammatory properties of natural compounds, e.g., curcumin, have documented success in the laboratory; and strategies to increase curcumin’s bio-availability are being addressed towards its clinical approval.  Similarly, the application of osteopathic manipulations, such as lymphatic pump techniques (LPTs), to enhance the flow of lymphs through the lymphatic system has been shown to reduce systemic inflammation.  Indeed, evidence shows that the numbers of osteopathic physicians (DOs) and osteopathic medical schools are increasing across the United States. Therefore, in addition to implementing these safer therapies in patients with chronic diseases, a clear molecular understanding of their systemic benefits would be of essential value. Indeed, effects of both naturopathic and osteopathic treatments on changes in the patient's microbiome and, possibly, changes in the micro-RNA contents of their secreted exosomes may provide some clues.

Therefore, this Special Issue will focus on recent developments in the field of naturopathic and osteopathic medicines and on the molecular findings that provide us with a better understanding of their therapeutic effects. Original research articles, case studies, and review papers will be accepted for publication in this Special Issue.

Dr. Debasis Mondal
Dr. Syed Siraj A. Quadri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chronic diseases
  • inflammation
  • therapy
  • side effects
  • natural compounds
  • osteopathic medicine
  • systemic effects
  • microbiome
  • exosome
  • miRNA

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
Herb–Drug Interactions: Worlds Intersect with the Patient at the Center
Medicines 2021, 8(8), 44; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicines8080044 - 05 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1217
Abstract
This review examines three bodies of literature related to herb–drug interactions: case reports, clinical studies, evaluations found in six drug interaction checking resources. The aim of the study is to examine the congruity of resources and to assess the degree to which case [...] Read more.
This review examines three bodies of literature related to herb–drug interactions: case reports, clinical studies, evaluations found in six drug interaction checking resources. The aim of the study is to examine the congruity of resources and to assess the degree to which case reports signal for further study. A qualitative review of case reports seeks to determine needs and perspectives of case report authors. Methods: Systematic search of Medline identified clinical studies and case reports of interacting herb–drug combinations. Interacting herb–drug pairs were searched in six drug interaction resources. Case reports were analyzed qualitatively for completeness and to identify underlying themes. Results: Ninety-nine case-report documents detailed 107 cases. Sixty-five clinical studies evaluated 93 mechanisms of interaction relevant to herbs reported in case studies, involving 30 different herbal products; 52.7% of these investigations offered evidence supporting reported reactions. Cohen’s kappa found no agreement between any interaction checker and case report corpus. Case reports often lacked full information. Need for further information, attitudes about herbs and herb use, and strategies to reduce risk from interaction were three primary themes in the case report corpus. Conclusions: Reliable herb–drug information is needed, including open and respectful discussion with patients. Full article
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