Special Issue "Gut Microbiota Metabolites in Health and Disease"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Giulia Malaguarnera
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Center “The Great Senescence”, University of Catania, 95100 Catania, Italy
Interests: gut microbiota; metabolites; metabolism; Alzheimer’s disease; retina; diabetes; nutrition; pharmacology; gastrointestinal diseases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The total number of bacterial species found in the gastrointestinal tract is estimated to be about 500–1000 [1]. A total of 90% of bacterial phyla of the gut microbiota are Bacteroides and Firmicutes [2]. The remaining species, however even if in lower quantities, may also provide important metabolites for health.

The gut microbiota varies between individuals, ages, and diet. The inter-individual data of fecal samples may provide a microbiome functional core in important biochemical or physiological pathways [3,4].

Many biomolecules are produced endogenously by commensal microbes in the digestive tract. These biomolecules include vitamins, fermentation products, and gut-derived hormones.  

Gut dysbiosis may provoke proinflammatory innate immunity response and can interfere with the crosstalk between the gut microbiota and the host releasing various biomolecules. Effects may be seen in other organs such as the liver and the brain.

This Special Issue aims to collect articles on the metabolites produced by the gut microbiota and how they are correlated to health and disease status. 

[1] Sommer, F.; Bäckhed, F. The gut microbiota-masters of host development and physiology. Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 2013, 11, 227–238.

[2] Qin, J.; Li, R.; Raes, Jeroen; Arumugam, M.; Burgdorf, K.S.; Manichanh, C.; Nielsen, T.; Pons, N.; Levenez, F.; Yamada, T. et.al. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing. Nature, 2010, 464, 59–65.

[3] Lloyd-Price, J.; Abu-Ali, G.; Huttenhower, C. The healthy human microbiome. Genome Medicine 2016, 8, 51.

[4] Biagi, E.; Franceschi, C. Rampelli, S.; Severgnini, M. Ostan, R. Turroni, S. Consolandi, C.; Quercia, S. Scurti, M. Monti, D. Gut Microbiota and Extreme Longevity. Curr. Biol., 2016, 26, 1480–1485

Dr. Giulia Malaguarnera
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gut microbiota
  • dysbiosis
  • gut–brain axis
  • bioactive compounds
  • malnutrition
  • short chain acids

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Fiber-Rich Barley Increases Butyric Acid-Producing Bacteria in the Human Gut Microbiota
Metabolites 2021, 11(8), 559; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/metabo11080559 - 22 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 944
Abstract
Butyric acid produced in the intestine by butyric acid-producing bacteria (BAPB) is known to suppress excessive inflammatory response and may prevent chronic disease development. We evaluated whether fiber-rich barley intake increases BAPB in the gut and concomitantly butyric acid in feces. Eighteen healthy [...] Read more.
Butyric acid produced in the intestine by butyric acid-producing bacteria (BAPB) is known to suppress excessive inflammatory response and may prevent chronic disease development. We evaluated whether fiber-rich barley intake increases BAPB in the gut and concomitantly butyric acid in feces. Eighteen healthy adults received granola containing functional barley (BARLEYmax®) once daily for four weeks. Fecal DNA before intake, after intake, and one month after intake was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing to assess microbial diversity, microbial composition at the order level, and the proportion of BAPB. Fecal butyric acid concentration was also measured. There were no significant differences in diversities and microbial composition between samples. The proportion of BAPB increased significantly after the intake (from 5.9% to 8.2%). However, one month after stopping the intake, the proportion of BAPB returned to the original value (5.4%). Fecal butyric acid concentration increased significantly from 0.99 mg/g feces before intake to 1.43 mg/g after intake (p = 0.028), which decreased significantly to 0.87 mg/g after stopping intake (p = 0.008). As BAPB produce butyric acid by degrading dietary fiber, functional barley may act as a prebiotic, increasing BAPB and consequently butyric acid in the intestine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microbiota Metabolites in Health and Disease)
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