Special Issue "Bio- and Hydrometallurgy and Bio-Crystallization of Secondary Minerals"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (22 September 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Zygmunt Sadowski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Process Engineering and Technology of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50 370 Wroclaw, Poland
Interests: biohydrometallurgy; biogeochemistry; colloid chemistry; surface chemistry; adsorption; bionanotechnology; mineral processing
Dr. Agnieszka Pawlowska
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Process Engineering and Technology of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50 370 Wroclaw, Poland
Interests: biohydrometallurgy (bioleaching, biosorption); nanoparticle biosynthesis; surfactant/biosurfactant adsorption on minerals; mineral processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past three decades, there has been systematic growth in the application of bio- and hydrometallurgical methods. Depletion of the primary metal resources and stricter environmental regulations have triggered a need for the use of low-grade ores and waste. This Special Issue focuses on bioleaching as an alternative method of metal extraction from ores, concentrates, slags, and mine tailings involving microorganisms. In a natural environment, bacteria associated with minerals are also responsible for bio-weathering and biocorrosion. The result of all presented processes is acid mine drainage (AMD), which is a source of a wide variety of metal ions. Leachate generated from bio- and chemical processes is a metal-rich solution. There is still a need to propose systems and operations for selective recovery of metals from polymetallic solutions but also to develop other applications of this kind of solutions, e.g., in nanoparticle synthesis. Another critical issue is waste management.  

Schwertmannite, jarosite, ferrihydrite, and goethite as secondary iron hydroxysulfates are formed in acidic and sulfate-rich environments. They affect the bioleaching process but can also serve as sorbents for toxic metals to prevent environmental pollution, e.g., via the immobilization of arsenic ions. Therefore, the role of secondary minerals in leaching and bioleaching processes is worth explaining.

Prof. Dr. Zygmunt Sadowski
Dr. Agnieszka Pawlowska
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mineral leaching
  • Bioleaching
  • Acid mine drainage (AMD)
  • Bio-precipitation
  • Schwertmannite
  • Jarosite
  • Goethite
  • Nanoparticles
  • Biosynthesis
  • Arsenic

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Lead Recovery from Solid Residues of Copper Industry Using Triethylenetetramine Solution
Minerals 2021, 11(5), 546; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/min11050546 - 20 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 874
Abstract
Industrial processing of mineral ores and concentrates generates large amounts of solid residues, which can be landfilled or further processed to recover selected elements depending on its economical profitability. Pressure leaching is a technology enabling high recovery of base metals like copper and [...] Read more.
Industrial processing of mineral ores and concentrates generates large amounts of solid residues, which can be landfilled or further processed to recover selected elements depending on its economical profitability. Pressure leaching is a technology enabling high recovery of base metals like copper and zinc, transferring others like lead and iron to the solid residue. High temperature and pressure of such leaching leads to formation of sparingly soluble lead jarosite (plumbojarosite). The load of lead landfilled as solid residues resulting from such operation is so big that its recovery is perspective and crucial for waste-limiting technologies. This paper is devoted to lead extraction from pressure leaching residues using triethylenetetramine solution and then its precipitation as a commercial lead carbonate. The highest obtained recovery of lead was 91.3%. Additionally, presented technology allows to manage and recycle amine solution and reuse solid products. Produced pure lead carbonate can be directly added to smelting, not increasing temperature within the furnace. Full article
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