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Topical Collection "Feature Papers from High Cited Researchers"

Editor

Prof. Dr. Farid Chemat
grade E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Université d´Avignon et des Pays du Vaucluse, 84029 Avignon, France
Interests: green extraction; alternative solvents; innovative technologies; original procedures; microwave; ultrasound; intensification
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

The journal Molecules helps researchers disseminate their research and also provides free access to scientific and technical information.

The 2020 list of Highly Cited Researchers was recently published (https://recognition.webofscience.com/awards/highly-cited/2020/). Highly Cited Researchers, who rank in the top 1% according to citations, have been selected for their exceptional influence and performance for the period 2009–2019. They are pioneers in their field and have been recognized by their peers.

The present Special Issue will honor Highly Cited Researchers from Molecules and invite them to contribute an article or a review in the field of the journal.

It is also an honor to have many High Cited Researchers from different disciplines serving as Editorial members (Prof. Dr. Maurizio Battino, Prof. Dr. Didier Astruc, Dr. Francisco J. Barba, Prof. Dr. Cyrille Boyer, Prof. Dr. Neil Champness, Prof. Dr. Wei Chen, Prof. Dr. Daniel Granato, Prof. Dr. Baibiao Huang, Prof. Dr. Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh, Dr. Rob Keyzers, Dr. Yangchao Luo, Prof. Dr. Rafael Luque, Prof. Dr. Yanming Ma, Prof. Dr. Liqiang Mai, Prof. Dr. Jianbo Xiao) in Molecules. 

Prof. Dr. Farid Chemat
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

2021

Perspective
Heterogeneous Catalysis to Drive the Waste-to-Pharma Concept: From Furanics to Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients
Molecules 2021, 26(21), 6738; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules26216738 - 08 Nov 2021
Viewed by 301
Abstract
A perspective on the use of heterogeneous catalysis to drive the waste-to-pharma concept is provided in this contribution based on the conversion of furanics to active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). The provided overview of the concept in this perspective article has been exemplified for [...] Read more.
A perspective on the use of heterogeneous catalysis to drive the waste-to-pharma concept is provided in this contribution based on the conversion of furanics to active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). The provided overview of the concept in this perspective article has been exemplified for two key molecule examples: Ancarolol and Furosemide. Full article
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Review
Citrus aurantium L. Active Constituents, Biological Effects and Extraction Methods. An Updated Review
Molecules 2021, 26(19), 5832; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules26195832 - 26 Sep 2021
Viewed by 739
Abstract
Citrus genus is a prominent staple crop globally. Long-term breeding and much hybridization engendered a myriad of species, each characterized by a specific metabolism generating different secondary metabolites. Citrus aurantium L., commonly recognized as sour or bitter orange, can exceptionally be distinguished from [...] Read more.
Citrus genus is a prominent staple crop globally. Long-term breeding and much hybridization engendered a myriad of species, each characterized by a specific metabolism generating different secondary metabolites. Citrus aurantium L., commonly recognized as sour or bitter orange, can exceptionally be distinguished from other Citrus species by unique characteristics. It is a fruit with distinctive flavor, rich in nutrients and phytochemicals which possess different health benefits. This paper presents an overview of the most recent studies done on the matter. It intends to provide an in-depth understanding of the biological activities and medicinal uses of active constituents existing in C. aurantium. Every plant part is first discussed separately with regards to its content in active constituents. All extraction methods, their concepts and yields, used to recover these valuable molecules from their original plant matrix are thoroughly reported. Full article
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Graphical abstract

Article
Adsorption of Crystal Violet Dye Using Activated Carbon of Lemon Wood and Activated Carbon/Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanocomposite from Aqueous Solutions: A Kinetic, Equilibrium and Thermodynamic Study
Molecules 2021, 26(8), 2241; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules26082241 - 13 Apr 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 766
Abstract
Activated carbon prepared from lemon (Citrus limon) wood (ACL) and ACL/Fe3O4 magnetic nanocomposite were effectively used to remove the cationic dye of crystal violet (CV) from aqueous solutions. The results showed that Fe3O4 nanoparticles were [...] Read more.
Activated carbon prepared from lemon (Citrus limon) wood (ACL) and ACL/Fe3O4 magnetic nanocomposite were effectively used to remove the cationic dye of crystal violet (CV) from aqueous solutions. The results showed that Fe3O4 nanoparticles were successfully placed in the structure of ACL and the produced nanocomposites showed superior magnetic properties. It was found that pH was the most effective parameter in the CV dye adsorption and pH of 9 gave the maximum adsorption efficiency of 93.5% and 98.3% for ACL and ACL/Fe3O4, respectively. The Dubinin–Radushkevich (D-R) and Langmuir models were selected to investigate the CV dye adsorption equilibrium behavior for ACL and ACL/Fe3O4, respectively. A maximum adsorption capacity of 23.6 and 35.3 mg/g was obtained for ACL and ACL/Fe3O4, respectively indicating superior adsorption capacity of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The kinetic data of the adsorption process followed the pseudo-second order (PSO) kinetic model, indicating that chemical mechanisms may have an effect on the CV dye adsorption. The negative values obtained for Gibb’s free energy parameter (−20 < ΔG < 0 kJ/mol) showed that the adsorption process using both types of the adsorbents was physical. Moreover, the CV dye adsorption enthalpy (ΔH) values of −45.4 for ACL and −56.9 kJ/mol for ACL/Fe3O4 were obtained indicating that the adsorption process was exothermic. Overall, ACL and ACL/Fe3O4 magnetic nanocomposites provide a novel and effective type of adsorbents to remove CV dye from the aqueous solutions. Full article
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Article
Efficacy of Phytochemicals Derived from Avicennia officinalis for the Management of COVID-19: A Combined In Silico and Biochemical Study
Molecules 2021, 26(8), 2210; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules26082210 - 12 Apr 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 1321
Abstract
The recent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a global threat for healthcare management and the economic system, and effective treatments against the pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus responsible for this disease have not yet progressed beyond the developmental [...] Read more.
The recent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a global threat for healthcare management and the economic system, and effective treatments against the pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus responsible for this disease have not yet progressed beyond the developmental phases. As drug refinement and vaccine progression require enormously broad investments of time, alternative strategies are urgently needed. In this study, we examined phytochemicals extracted from Avicennia officinalis and evaluated their potential effects against the main protease of SARS-CoV-2. The antioxidant activities of A. officinalis leaf and fruit extracts at 150 µg/mL were 95.97% and 92.48%, respectively. Furthermore, both extracts displayed low cytotoxicity levels against Artemia salina. The gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy analysis confirmed the identifies of 75 phytochemicals from both extracts, and four potent compounds, triacontane, hexacosane, methyl linoleate, and methyl palminoleate, had binding free energy values of −6.75, −6.7, −6.3, and −6.3 Kcal/mol, respectively, in complexes with the SARS-CoV-2 main protease. The active residues Cys145, Met165, Glu166, Gln189, and Arg188 in the main protease formed non-bonded interactions with the screened compounds. The root-mean-square difference (RMSD), root-mean-square fluctuations (RMSF), radius of gyration (Rg), solvent-accessible surface area (SASA), and hydrogen bond data from a molecular dynamics simulation study confirmed the docked complexes′ binding rigidity in the atomistic simulated environment. However, this study′s findings require in vitro and in vivo validation to ensure the possible inhibitory effects and pharmacological efficacy of the identified compounds. Full article
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