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Special Issue "Current Advances in Medicinal Phytochemistry—A Themed Issue in Honour of Professor Simon Gibbons"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Agnieszka Ludwiczuk
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Independent Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Products, Medical University of Lublin, Poland
Interests: bioactivity-guided isolation and structural characterization of compounds from medicinal, aromatic, and spore-forming plants; the chemical relationships of algae, bryophytes, and ferns; the chemosystematics of non-vascular plants from the division Marchantiophyta, based on their terpenoid, aromatic, and phenolic constituents
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Yoshinori Asakawa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Japan
Interests: natural product chemistry; isolation and structure elucidation of bioactive secondary metabolites of bryophytes, pteridophytes, inedible mushrooms, medicinal and aromatic plants and insects and their bioassay; biotransformation of secondary metabolites by fungi and mammals; total synthesis of natural products; chemical reaction of organic per-acids; chemical phylogeny of spore-forming plants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We welcome the submission of original research papers and review articles for the Special Issue of Molecules that will honor Prof. Simon Gibbons for his contribution in the field of Medicinal Phytochemistry.

He and his group have carried out excellent research in the chemistry and antibacterial activity of natural products from plants and his expertise is in the isolation, structure elucidation and biological evaluation of these compounds. He is also interested in compounds that modify bacterial resistance. A further focus of his research is into the characterization of natural and synthetic New Psychoactive Substances that can be crude plant or fungal materials or single natural or synthetic chemical entities.

Simon Gibbons is Head of the UEA School of Pharmacy and Professor of Natural Product Chemistry. He received BSc and PhD degrees in Chemistry and Phytochemistry respectively and worked in the Biotechnology sector in Natural Product Chemistry from 1993-1997. In October 1997 he was appointed as Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the Faculty of Pharmacy at Kuwait University and in 1999 moved to the University of London to become Lecturer in Pharmacognosy. In 2007 he was appointed as Professor of Phytochemistry. Currently, he is a co-opted member of the UK Government Home Office’s Cannabis-Based Medicinal Products Work Group and was a Council Member of the UK Home Office Advisory Council for the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) and Chairman of the Novel Psychoactive Substances Committee (NPSC). From 2010-2012 he was a member of the Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory products Agency (MHRA) Herbal Medicines Advisory Committee (HMAC). In 2009 he was elected as a Fellow of the Prince of Wales Foundation for Integrated Health. He is also a Fellow of the Linnean Society of London and the Royal Society of Chemistry and in 2009 was invited to be an Associate Researcher of the University Kebangsaan Malaysia.

He was President and Vice-President of the Phytochemical Society of Europe from 2010-2016 and has been honoured for his work as recipient of the Pharmanex Prize for Phytochemistry (2012), the first Tshwane University of Technology Vice Chancellor’s Seminar Award (2009) and the 2005 Phytochemical Society of Europe - Pierre Fabre Award for Phytochemistry.

Simon Gibbons is founding Editor-in-Chief of Phytochemistry Letters and Co-editor of Progress in the Chemistry of Organic Natural Products (“Zechmeister”) and a member of the Editorial Boards of Journal of Natural Products, Phytochemical Analysis, Phytochemistry Reviews, Fitoterapia, Phytotherapy Research, Chinese Journal of Natural Medicines (CJNM), Scientia Pharmaceutica, Natural Products and Bioprospecting and Phytopharmacotherapy.

In the Special Issue, we aim to collect original research articles and review articles in the following topics:

  • Plant-derived antibacterials
  • Natural product bacterial resistance modifying agents
  • The chemistry and pharmacology of novel psychoactive substances and drugs of abuse
  • Phytochemistry of Herbal drugs
  • Bioactivity-guided isolation and structure characterization of compounds from medicinal plants
  • Bioactive potential of metabolites derived from plant endophytes
  • Synthetic transformations of biologically interesting compounds

Dr. Agnieszka Ludwiczuk
Prof. Dr. Yoshinori Asakawa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • natural products
  • medicinal plants
  • bioactive compounds
  • antibiotics
  • psychoactive drugs
  • isolation and structure elucidation
  • drug discovery

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication
Semisynthesis of Selenoauraptene
Molecules 2021, 26(9), 2798; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules26092798 - 10 May 2021
Viewed by 157
Abstract
Selenium-containing compounds are gaining more and more interest due to their valuable and promising pharmacological properties, mainly as anticancer and antioxidant agents. Ebselen, the up to now only approved drugs, is well known to possess very good glutathione peroxidase mimicking effects. To date, [...] Read more.
Selenium-containing compounds are gaining more and more interest due to their valuable and promising pharmacological properties, mainly as anticancer and antioxidant agents. Ebselen, the up to now only approved drugs, is well known to possess very good glutathione peroxidase mimicking effects. To date, the most of efforts have been directed to build pure synthetic Se containing molecules, while less attention have been devoted to Se-based semisynthetic products resembling natural compounds like terpenes, polyphenols, and alkaloids. The aim of this short communication is to report the synthesis of the first example of a Se-phenylpropanoids, namely selenoauraptene, containing a selenogeranyl side chain in position 7 of the umbelliferone core. The key step was the Newman-Kwart rearrangement to obtain a selenocarbamate in which the Se atom was directly attached to umbelliferone (replacing its 7-OH function) followed by hydrolysis to get diumbelliferyl diselenide, which was finally easily converted to the desired Se-geranyl derivative in quite a good overall yield (28.5%). The synthesized adduct displayed a greater antioxidant and a radical scavenger in vitro activity than parent auraptene. The procedure we describe herein, to the best of our knowledge for the first time in the literature, represents an easy-to-handle method for the synthesis of a wide array of seleno analogues of naturally occurring biologically active oxyprenylated secondary metabolites. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Anti-MRSA Constituents from Ruta chalepensis (Rutaceae) Grown in Iraq, and In Silico Studies on Two of Most Active Compounds, Chalepensin and 6-Hydroxy-rutin 3′,7-Dimethyl ether
Molecules 2021, 26(4), 1114; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules26041114 - 19 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 708
Abstract
Ruta chalepensis L. (Rutaceae), a perennial herb with wild and cultivated habitats, is well known for its traditional uses as an anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic agent, and in the treatment of rheumatism, nerve diseases, neuralgia, dropsy, convulsions and mental disorders. The antimicrobial activities of [...] Read more.
Ruta chalepensis L. (Rutaceae), a perennial herb with wild and cultivated habitats, is well known for its traditional uses as an anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic agent, and in the treatment of rheumatism, nerve diseases, neuralgia, dropsy, convulsions and mental disorders. The antimicrobial activities of the crude extracts from the fruits, leaves, stem and roots of R. chalepensis were initially evaluated against two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacterial strains and a strain of the fungus Candida albicans. Phytochemical investigation afforded 19 compounds, including alkaloids, coumarins, flavonoid glycosides, a cinnamic acid derivative and a long-chain alkane. These compounds were tested against a panel of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, i.e., ATCC 25923, SA-1199B, XU212, MRSA-274819 and EMRSA-15. The MIC values of the active compounds, chalepin (9), chalepensin (10), rutamarin (11), rutin 3′-methyl ether (14), rutin 7,4′-dimethyl ether (15), 6-hydroxy-rutin 3′,7-dimethyl ether (16) and arborinine (18) were in the range of 32–128 µg/mL against the tested MRSA strains. Compounds 10 and 16 were the most active compounds from R. chalepensis, and were active against four out of six tested MRSA strains, and in silico studies were performed on these compounds. The anti-MRSA activity of compound 16 was comparable to that of the positive control norfloxacin (MICs 32 vs 16 μg/mL, respectively) against the MRSA strain XU212, which is a Kuwaiti hospital isolate that possesses the TetK tetracycline efflux pump. This is the first report on the anti-MRSA property of compounds isolated from R. chalepensis and relevant in silico studies on the most active compounds. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
7-Isopentenyloxycoumarin: What Is New across the Last Decade
Molecules 2020, 25(24), 5923; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules25245923 - 14 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 464
Abstract
7-Isopentenyloxycoumarin is among the most widespread naturally occurring prenyloxy umbelliferone derivatives. This secondary metabolite of mixed biosynthetic origin has been typically isolated from plants belonging to several genera of the Rutaceae and Apiaceae families, comprising widely used medicinal plants and in general plants [...] Read more.
7-Isopentenyloxycoumarin is among the most widespread naturally occurring prenyloxy umbelliferone derivatives. This secondary metabolite of mixed biosynthetic origin has been typically isolated from plants belonging to several genera of the Rutaceae and Apiaceae families, comprising widely used medicinal plants and in general plants with beneficial effects on human welfare, as well as edible fruits and vegetables. Although known for quite a long time (more than 50 years), only in the last two decades has this natural compound been revealed to exert powerful and promising pharmacological properties, such as active cancer chemopreventive, antibacterial, antiprotozoal, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and antioxidant properties, among the activities best outlined in the recent literature. The aim of this comprehensive miniature review article is to detail the novel natural sources and the effects described during the last decade for 7-isopentenyloxycoumarin and what has been reported on the mechanisms of action underlying the observed biological activities of this oxyprenylated secondary metabolite. In view of the herein described data, suggestions on how to address future research on the abovementioned natural product and structurally related derivatives in the best ways according to the authors will be also provided. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Flavonoids as inhibitors of efflux pumps
Authors: Franz Bucar; Martin Waditzer
Affiliation: University of Graz, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graz, Austria
Abstract: Flavonoids are widely occurring secondary plant constituents, and are abundant in vegetable and fruit diets as well as herbal medicines. Therapeutic treatment options for bacterial infections are limited due to the spread of antimicrobial resistances. Hence, in a number of studies during the last years, different classes of plant secondary metabolites as resistance-modifying agents have been studied. In this review, the role of flavonoids as inhibitors of bacterial efflux pumps will be presented. As selectivity of compounds towards bacterial efflux pumps or transporters present in humans is an important issue, also influence of such flavonoids on human transport proteins will be discussed.

Title: Anti-MRSA constituents from Ruta chalepensis (Rutaceae) grown in Iraq, and in silico studies on two most active compounds, chalepensin and 6-hydroxy-rutin 3',7-dimethyl ether
Authors: Sarker SD
Affiliation: Liverpool John Moores University
Abstract: -

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