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Special Issue "Chemistry in Pavement Materials"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Zhanping You
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931-1295, USA
Interests: design, construction, and maintenance of pavements; micromechanics for road materials; discrete and finite element modeling techniques; construction materials: asphalt, aggregate; alternative and recycled materials for civil engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Shihui Shen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Rail Transportation Engineering, Penn State Altoona, 1431 12th Ave., Altoona, PA 16601, USA
Interests: civil engineering material characterization and modeling; pavement performance evaluation and monitoring; innovative design and materials for infrastructure sustainability; sensing technology application in transportation infrastructure

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a tremendous amount of interest in the design and construction of sustainable asphalt pavement systems among academics, industries, government entities and various stakeholders. This Special Issue aims to provide a unique platform to exchange ideas on topics related to the materials, design, production and chemical application aspects of asphalt technology. This Special Issue aims to provide a unique flatform to exchange ideas on topics related to the materials, design, production and processing, construction, and maintenance aspects of asphalt technology. We especially welcome articles on the chemistry of asphalt, fundamental asphaltic material characterization, innovative material design and synthesis, such as the bio-asphalt and chemistry modification of asphalt with polymers and waste plastics, modeling using methodologies such as molecular dynamics and atomic force microscopy, as well as pavement mechanics and performance modeling using mechanics or empirical-based approaches. We also believe that topics related to the chemistry aspect of cement materials, concrete, and chemical stabilization are suitable for this Special Issue.

This Special Issue will cover recent progress and trends in the utilization of chemistry in pavement material practice, but also in the research and development front. Submissions are welcome, but are not limited to the topics listed. Types of contributions to this Special Issue can be full research articles, short communications, and reviews focusing on advances in asphalt materials and other pavement materials.

Prof. Zhanping You
Prof. Shihui Shen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Asphalt chemistry
  • Bio asphalt
  • Molecular dynamics
  • Materials chemistry
  • Asphalt processing method
  • Material modeling
  • Synthesis of pavement materials
  • Cementitious material chemistry
  • Chemical stabilization

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Characterizing the Diffusion and Rheological Properties of Aged Asphalt Binder Rejuvenated with Bio-Oil Based on Molecular Dynamic Simulations and Laboratory Experimentations
Molecules 2021, 26(23), 7080; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules26237080 - 23 Nov 2021
Viewed by 284
Abstract
Soybean-derived bio-oil is one of the vegetable-based oils that is gaining the most interest for potential use in the rejuvenation of aged asphalt binders. This laboratory study was conducted to characterize and quantify the diffusion and rheological properties of bio-oil-rejuvenated aged asphalt binder [...] Read more.
Soybean-derived bio-oil is one of the vegetable-based oils that is gaining the most interest for potential use in the rejuvenation of aged asphalt binders. This laboratory study was conducted to characterize and quantify the diffusion and rheological properties of bio-oil-rejuvenated aged asphalt binder (BRAA) using soybean oil. In the study, the chemical structure of the soybean oil was comparatively characterized using an element analyzer (EA), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and a Fourier infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, respectively. Based on the chemical structure of the bio-oil, BRAA molecular models were built for computing the diffusion parameters using molecular dynamic simulations. Likewise, a dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) test device was used for measuring and quantifying the rheological properties of the aged asphalt binder rejuvenated with 0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, and 5% soybean oil, respectively. The laboratory test results indicate that bio-oil could potentially improve the diffusion coefficients and phase angle of the aged asphalt binder. Similarly, the corresponding decrease in the complex shear modulus has a positive effect on the low-temperature properties of BRAA. For a bio-oil dosage 4.0%, the diffusion coefficients of the BRAA components are 1.52 × 10−8, 1.33 × 10−8, 3.47 × 10−8, 4.82 × 10−8 and 3.92 × 10−8, respectively. Similarly, the corresponding reduction in the complex shear modulus from 1.27 × 107 Pa to 4.0 × 105 Pa suggests an improvement in the low-temperature properties of BRAA. Overall, the study contributes to the literature on the potential use of soybean-derived bio-oil as a rejuvenator of aged asphalt binders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemistry in Pavement Materials)
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Article
High-Temperature Performance Evaluation of Asphaltenes-Modified Asphalt Binders
Molecules 2020, 25(15), 3326; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules25153326 - 22 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 928
Abstract
Asphalt binder comprises four main fractions—asphaltenes (A), saturates (S), aromatics (A), and resins (R)—referred to as “SARA”. Asphaltenes plays an important role in determining the linear viscoelastic behavior of asphalt binders. In this research, asphaltenes are added as a distinct modifier to improve [...] Read more.
Asphalt binder comprises four main fractions—asphaltenes (A), saturates (S), aromatics (A), and resins (R)—referred to as “SARA”. Asphaltenes plays an important role in determining the linear viscoelastic behavior of asphalt binders. In this research, asphaltenes are added as a distinct modifier to improve the performance properties of asphalt binder. The modified binders are aged using a rolling thin film oven. A dynamic shear rheometer is then used to measure the rheological properties of the binders at high temperatures. Changes in the chemical composition of the modified binders are also studied through the determination of SARA fractions, using precipitation and gravity-driven chromatography methods. The rheological results show that asphaltenes improve the stiffness and elasticity of asphalt binder. It is also shown that the addition of asphaltenes raises the high Performance grade (PG) temperature of the asphalt binder, with every 6% of asphaltenes added resulting in a one-interval increase in high PG temperature grade. SARA analysis shows that the increase in polar fraction content due to the addition of asphaltenes causes the stiffness, elasticity, and viscosity of asphalt binders to increase. The results indicate that asphaltenes are an effective yet inexpensive additive to improve asphalt binder properties at high temperatures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemistry in Pavement Materials)
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Article
Evaluation of Organosolv Lignin as an Oxidation Inhibitor in Bitumen
Molecules 2020, 25(10), 2455; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules25102455 - 25 May 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 941
Abstract
Organosolv lignin, a natural polymer, has been used in this study as an oxidation inhibitor in bitumen. Particularly, the effect of oxidative aging on the chemical compositional changes and on the rheology of bituminous binders with organosolv lignin and the impact to inhibit [...] Read more.
Organosolv lignin, a natural polymer, has been used in this study as an oxidation inhibitor in bitumen. Particularly, the effect of oxidative aging on the chemical compositional changes and on the rheology of bituminous binders with organosolv lignin and the impact to inhibit oxidation in bitumen were evaluated. Firstly, after analyzing the microstructure and surface characteristics of utilized organosolv lignin, a high shear mixing procedure was followed to produce binders of different proportions of lignin in bitumen. Pressure aging vessel conditioning was applied to these binders to simulate in-field aging and a series of tests were performed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to track the compositional changes of lignin–bitumen systems before and after aging respectively. The rheological changes due to oxidative aging in the different lignin–bitumen systems were studied by means of dynamic shear rheometer tests. Based on the spectroscopic laboratory analyses, certain proportions of organosolv lignin in bitumen have shown a potential oxidation retardation effect in bitumen since a reduction of carbonyl and sulfoxide compounds was observed. However, the addition of lignin reduced the fatigue life of bitumen and potentially led to an increase in brittle fracture sensitivity at low and medium temperatures. Nevertheless, lignin improved the rutting resistance at high temperatures. Overall, it can be concluded that organosolv lignin can suppress the oxidation of sulfur and carbon compounds in bitumen either by direct deceleration of oxidation reaction or interaction with compounds that otherwise are oxidizable, without seriously degrading the mechanical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemistry in Pavement Materials)
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Review

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Review
A Review of Characteristics of Bio-Oils and Their Utilization as Additives of Asphalts
Molecules 2021, 26(16), 5049; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules26165049 - 20 Aug 2021
Viewed by 560
Abstract
Transforming waste biomass materials into bio-oils in order to partially substitute petroleum asphalt can reduce environmental pollution and fossil energy consumption and has economic benefits. The characteristics of bio-oils and their utilization as additives of asphalts are the focus of this review. First, [...] Read more.
Transforming waste biomass materials into bio-oils in order to partially substitute petroleum asphalt can reduce environmental pollution and fossil energy consumption and has economic benefits. The characteristics of bio-oils and their utilization as additives of asphalts are the focus of this review. First, physicochemical properties of various bio-oils are characterized. Then, conventional, rheological, and chemical properties of bio-oil modified asphalt binders are synthetically reviewed, as well as road performance of bio-oil modified asphalt mixtures. Finally, performance optimization is discussed for bio-asphalt binders and mixtures. This review indicates that bio-oils are highly complex materials that contain various compounds. Moreover, bio-oils are source-depending materials for which its properties vary with different sources. Most bio-oils have a favorable stimulus upon the low temperature performance of asphalt binders and mixtures but exhibit a negative impact on their high-temperature performance. Moreover, a large amount of oxygen element, oxygen-comprising functional groups, and light components in plant-based bio-oils result in higher sensitivity to ageing of bio-oil modified asphalts. In order to increase the performance of bio-asphalts, most research has been limited to adding additive agents to bio-asphalts; therefore, more reasonable optimization methods need to be proposed. Furthermore, upcoming exploration is also needed to identify reasonable evaluation indicators of bio-oils, modification mechanisms of bio-asphalts, and long-term performance tracking in field applications of bio-asphalts during pavement service life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemistry in Pavement Materials)
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