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Special Issue "Identification and Quantitative Analysis of Bisphenols in Food, Biological and Environmental Samples, and Highly Processed Products by Chromatographic Techniques Coupled with Modern Detection Techniques (MS, MS/MS, FLD, and DAD)"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Analytical Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Tomasz Tuzimski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Chodźki 4a, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
Interests: theory and application of liquid chromatography; modern extraction techniques (eg., QuEChERS); detection techniques (DAD, FLD, MS, MS/MS); method development and validation; optimisation of chromatographic systems for separation and quantitative analysis of xenobiotics and others (multicomponent mixtures) in food, environmental and biological samples
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) have become a chemical group of special concern due to their ability to interfere with the hormonal system. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-production volume industrial chemical mainly used as a monomer in the production of polycarbonate plastics (~80%) and epoxy resins (~18%). Both of these polymers are widely used as food contact materials (viz. polycarbonate plastics in reusable food and drink containers, in tableware, and in water pipes, and epoxy resins as inner coatings of cans and lids of glass jars and bottles for food and beverages). Bisphenol A (BPA) has attracted significant concern because of its typical endocrine-disrupting effects and its widespread occurrence.

Common steps in sample treatment for most of the analytical methods reported for mixtures of bisphenols include sample pretreatment, extraction of analytes from the matrix, cleanup of the extracts to remove interferences, and concentration to achieve the desired sensitivity. Incontestable progress has been made in recent years regarding the development of the techniques of preparation of samples for analysis such as QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe), solid phase extraction (SPE), solid phase microextraction (SPME), stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), hallow-fiber liquid phase microextraction (HFLPME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), and focused ultrasonic solid–liquid extraction (FUSLE).

The most efficient approach to bisphenols analysis involves the use of chromatographic methods. The following chromatographic methods are most frequently applied in environmental/biological samples and food analysis: high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), and gas chromatography (GC).

The Special Issue is planned as a topic that presents, in a properly structured manner, up-to-date, state-of-the-art information on the very important field of high-performance chromatographic techniques coupled with modern detection techniques such as mass spectrometry (MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), fluorescence detection (FLD), and diode-array detection (DAD).

Chromatographic techniques coupled with modern detection techniques can find broad applications in the separation, identification, and quantification of bisphenol A (BPA) and important BPA structural analogs, such as bisphenol S (BPS), bisphenol F (BPF), bisphenol B (BPB), bisphenol C (BPC), bisphenol E (BPE), bisphenol M (BPM), bisphenol P (BPP), bisphenol Z (BPZ), bisphenol AF (BPAF), bisphenol AP (BPAP), bisphenol BP (BPBP), bisphenol FL (BPFL), dihydroxydiphenyl ether (DHDPE), and bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE).

I warmly invite our colleagues to submit their original contributions to this Special Issue in order to provide recent updates regarding chromatographic methods for bisphenols analysis related to food, biological and environmental samples, and highly processed products, that will be of interest to our readers.

I would be delighted if you could respond to confirm your contribution and the proposed title by 15 July 2019 to assist in planning the whole project. In the case of review articles, an additional brief (1–2 pages) description of the topic including a draft index is required. This preliminary step is essential to avoid overlapping of topics. The degree of novelty and the significance of the research will be scrutinized prior to the peer-reviewing process.

Dr. Tomasz Tuzimski (Ph.D., Adjunct Professor)
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bisphenol A and analogs;
  • extraction techniques (QuEChERS/d-SPE, SPE, SPME, SBSE, HFLPME, DLLME, FUSLE, and others);
  • chromatographic techniques (HPLC, UPLC, and GC);
  • detection techniques (MS, MS/MS, FLD, and DAD)

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A New LC-MS/MS Method for Simultaneous and Quantitative Detection of Bisphenol-A and Steroids in Target Tissues: A Power Tool to Characterize the Interference of Bisphenol-A Exposure on Steroid Levels
Molecules 2020, 25(1), 48; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules25010048 - 21 Dec 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1319
Abstract
Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, may affect in situ steroidogenesis and alter steroids levels. The present work proposes a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method to simultaneously quantify BPA, 17β-Estradiol and testosterone in two target tissues: testis and visceral fat mass. Analytes [...] Read more.
Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, may affect in situ steroidogenesis and alter steroids levels. The present work proposes a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method to simultaneously quantify BPA, 17β-Estradiol and testosterone in two target tissues: testis and visceral fat mass. Analytes were isolated and lipophilic impurities removed by two serial steps: liquid-liquid and solid phase extraction. All compounds were separated in a single gradient run by Kinetex F5 column and detected via multiple reaction monitoring using a triple quadrupole with a TurboIon electrospray source in both negative and positive modes. The method is selective and very sensitive. In the investigated concentration range, the linearity of the detector response is verified in both tissues. The use of specific SPE cartridges for affinity chromatography purification allows obtaining high percentages of process efficiency (68.0–83.3% for testicular tissue; 63.7–70.7% for visceral fat mass). Good repeatability and reproducibility was observed. The validated method can be efficiently applied for direct biological monitoring in testis and visceral fat mass from mice exposed to BPA. The quantification of compounds in a single assay could be achieved without a loss of sensitivity. Full article
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Article
Method Development for Selected Bisphenols Analysis in Sweetened Condensed Milk from a Can and Breast Milk Samples by HPLC–DAD and HPLC-QqQ-MS: Comparison of Sorbents (Z-SEP, Z-SEP Plus, PSA, C18, Chitin and EMR-Lipid) for Clean-Up of QuEChERS Extract
Molecules 2019, 24(11), 2093; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules24112093 - 01 Jun 2019
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2110
Abstract
Background: Identification and quantitative determination of analytes released from the packaging material is undoubtedly a difficult and tricky task, requiring the chemical analyst to develop an individual approach to obtain reliable analytical information. Unfortunately, it is still challenging for scientists to determine [...] Read more.
Background: Identification and quantitative determination of analytes released from the packaging material is undoubtedly a difficult and tricky task, requiring the chemical analyst to develop an individual approach to obtain reliable analytical information. Unfortunately, it is still challenging for scientists to determine bisphenols at trace or even ultra-trace levels in samples characterized by a very complex, and often variable, matrix composition. Objective: Optimization and application of QuEChERS/d-SPE coupled with HPLC-DAD (and LC-QqQ-MS) method for the simultaneous determination of bisphenols (A, S, F, B, BADGE and derivatives) in milk samples from a can and breast milk samples have been performed. Methods: Concerning the analysis of unconjugated analytes, after the thawing and shaking the sample (5 mL breast milk or 10 mL milk samples from a can), it was transferred into a 50 mL polypropylene centrifuge tube. For the analysis of the total amount of analytes, prior to the extraction with acetonitrile, a deconjugation step was implemented in a tube by adding to sample, the an Isotopically Labelled Internal Standard (IS) solution (50 ng/mL) and 1 mL of the enzymatic solution with the β-Glucuronidase (3500 U/mL). The mix was homogenized and incubated for 16–18 h at 37 °C. Next, 10 mL of acetonitrile, and a QuEChERS salt packet (4 g anhydrous MgSO4, 1 g NaCl) were added. After shaking and centrifugation, the total acetonitrile layer was isolated in a polypropylene tube evaporate to dryness, and reconstitute in 1.2 mL acetonitrile. During d-SPE step the extract was transferred into a 15 mL polypropylene tube with Z-Sep and primary secondary amine (PSA). Next, shake the tube, store in fridge, and centrifuge for 15 min. The acetonitrile supernatant was obtained with a pipette and evaporated to dryness. Mixture MeOH: water (20:80, v/v) were added to the dry residue and the extract was reconstitute in 200 μL and analyzed by HPLC-DAD and HPLC–QqQ-MS equipment. Conclusion: Six different salts during d-SPE step were evaluated such as: zirconium dioxide-based sorbent (Z-Sep, Z-Sep Plus), primary secondary amine (PSA), octadecyl (C18), EMR-Lipid, Chitin and also their mixtures. Negligible matrix interference was observed for most of the analytes due to application of Z-Sep and PSA in dispersive-solid phase extraction clean-up step. Extraction of target analytes was performed using QuEChERS/d-SPE cleanup, and presents good performance for selected analytes with recoveries in the range of 15–103% and relative standard deviations (RSD) less than 10% in breast milk samples. Full article
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