molecules-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Chitin and Chitosan Derivatives: Biological Activities and Application 2020"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Medicinal Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Már Másson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Hofsvallagata 53, IS-107 Reykjavík, Iceland
Interests: chitosan and chitosan conjugates; synthesis; structure activity relationship (SAR); spectroscopy; antimicrobial chitosan conjugates and natural compound derivatives; photochemistry; NMR analysis; nanomedicine; nanoparticles; regenerative medicine; antimicrobial activity; absorption enhancers; photodynamic therapy; cancer therapy; mathematical modeling and design of experiment (DOE)
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ólafur E. Sigurjónsson
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Blood Bank, Landspitali University Hospital, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland
2. Biomedical Engineering Department, Reykjavik University, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland
Interests: platelet lysates in biomaterial use; bone tissue engineering; bioreactors for bone tissue engineering
Dr. Federico Lopez-Moya
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Multidisciplinary Institute for Environmental Studies/Department of Marine Sciences and Applied Biology, University of Alicante, Apdo. 99, E-03080 Alicante, Spain
Interests: biocontrol; nematophagous fungi; entomopathogenic fungi; chitosan; plant pathology; endophytes; fungal "omics"
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chitosan is a unique biopolymer that is derived from chitin. It can be polycationic under somewhat acidic conditions, and this separates it from other common polysaccharides that are either neutral or have a negative net charge in aqueous solutions. It is also biocompatible and has significant biological activity, most notably an antimicrobial effect, and has also been shown to stimulate tissue regeneration. Chitosan and chitooligosaccharides have been marked as neutraceuticals and used in wound treatment and in scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. There is also much interest in applications in drug delivery, including the use of chitosan as an absorption enhancer, in nanoparticles and non-viral gene delivery. Chemical modification of the chitin and chitosan backbone can be used to further expand the applicability and bioactivity of these biopolymers. Polar moieties can be introduced to improve solubility and biological activity under certain conditions, and conjugates with novel activities can created by covalent linking to other biomolecules. The derivatization of chitin and chitosan is now a very active research field, where new derivatives have been created using different approaches, including conventional synthesized chemical procedures, sometimes also involving the use of protection groups via ‘‘click chemistry“ or enzymatic grafting or by crosslinking to make biocompatible polymer networks.

The aim this Special Issue is to highlight these developments and bring toghether new findings related to biologically active chitin and chitosan derivatives. Reporting of new approaches for chemical modification and charactierization, including detailed structural characterization by NMR or other methods as well as exciting new findings with regard to biological activity and the application of chitin and chitosan derivatives, will be included in this Special Issue.

Dr. Már Másson
Prof. Ólafur Sigurjónsson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chitin
  • chitosan
  • chitooligosaccharides
  • derivatives
  • conjugates
  • synthesis
  • protection groups
  • grafting
  • click chemistry
  • structure
  • molecular weight
  • NMR
  • FT-IR
  • X-ray
  • SEC
  • Mw
  • antimicrobial
  • regeneration
  • cell growth
  • tight-junction
  • anti-cancer
  • drug-delivery
  • gene-delivery
  • absorption
  • wound healing
  • bone growth
  • nanoparticles
  • hydrogels
  • films
  • membranes
  • coatings

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Chitosan and Lecithin Ameliorate Osteoarthritis Symptoms Induced by Monoiodoacetate in a Rat Model
Molecules 2020, 25(23), 5738; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules25235738 - 04 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 692
Abstract
The present work aimed to assess the chondroprotective influence of chitosan and lecithin in a monoiodoacetate (MIA)-induced experimental osteoarthritis (OA) model. Forty male rats weighing 180–200 g were randomly distributed among the following five experimental groups (eight per group): control, MIA-induced OA, MIA-induced [...] Read more.
The present work aimed to assess the chondroprotective influence of chitosan and lecithin in a monoiodoacetate (MIA)-induced experimental osteoarthritis (OA) model. Forty male rats weighing 180–200 g were randomly distributed among the following five experimental groups (eight per group): control, MIA-induced OA, MIA-induced OA + chitosan, MIA-induced OA + lecithin, and MIA-induced OA + chitosan + lecithin. The levels of TNF-α, IL6, RF, ROS, and CRP, as well as mitochondrial markers such as mitochondrial swelling, cytochrome C oxidase (complex IV), MMP, and serum oxidative/antioxidant status (MDA level) (MPO and XO activities) were elevated in MIA-induced OA. Also, SDH (complex II) activity in addition to the levels of ATP, glutathione (GSH), and thiol was markedly diminished in the MIA-induced OA group compared to in control rats. These findings show that mitochondrial function is associated with OA pathophysiology and suggest that chitosan and lecithin could be promising potential ameliorative agents in OA animal models. Lecithin was more effective than chitosan in ameliorating all of the abovementioned parameters. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Recent Developments in Chitosan-Based Micro/Nanofibers for Sustainable Food Packaging, Smart Textiles, Cosmeceuticals, and Biomedical Applications
Molecules 2021, 26(9), 2683; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules26092683 - 03 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 817
Abstract
Chitosan has many useful intrinsic properties (e.g., non-toxicity, antibacterial properties, and biodegradability) and can be processed into high-surface-area nanofiber constructs for a broad range of sustainable research and commercial applications. These nanofibers can be further functionalized with bioactive agents. In the food industry, [...] Read more.
Chitosan has many useful intrinsic properties (e.g., non-toxicity, antibacterial properties, and biodegradability) and can be processed into high-surface-area nanofiber constructs for a broad range of sustainable research and commercial applications. These nanofibers can be further functionalized with bioactive agents. In the food industry, for example, edible films can be formed from chitosan-based composite fibers filled with nanoparticles, exhibiting excellent antioxidant and antimicrobial properties for a variety of products. Processing ‘pure’ chitosan into nanofibers can be challenging due to its cationic nature and high crystallinity; therefore, chitosan is often modified or blended with other materials to improve its processability and tailor its performance to specific needs. Chitosan can be blended with a variety of natural and synthetic polymers and processed into fibers while maintaining many of its intrinsic properties that are important for textile, cosmeceutical, and biomedical applications. The abundance of amine groups in the chemical structure of chitosan allows for facile modification (e.g., into soluble derivatives) and the binding of negatively charged domains. In particular, high-surface-area chitosan nanofibers are effective in binding negatively charged biomolecules. Recent developments of chitosan-based nanofibers with biological activities for various applications in biomedical, food packaging, and textiles are discussed herein. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Understanding the Factors Influencing Chitosan-Based Nanoparticles-Protein Corona Interaction and Drug Delivery Applications
Molecules 2020, 25(20), 4758; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules25204758 - 16 Oct 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 723
Abstract
Chitosan is a polymer that is extensively used to prepare nanoparticles (NPs) with tailored properties for applications in many fields of human activities. Among them, targeted drug delivery, especially when cancer therapy is the main interest, is a major application of chitosan-based NPs. [...] Read more.
Chitosan is a polymer that is extensively used to prepare nanoparticles (NPs) with tailored properties for applications in many fields of human activities. Among them, targeted drug delivery, especially when cancer therapy is the main interest, is a major application of chitosan-based NPs. Due to its positive charges, chitosan is used to produce the core of the NPs or to cover NPs made from other types of polymers, both strategies aiming to protect the carried drug until NPs reach the target sites and to facilitate the uptake and drug delivery into these cells. A major challenge in the design of these chitosan-based NPs is the formation of a protein corona (PC) upon contact with biological fluids. The composition of the PC can, to some extent, be modulated depending on the size, shape, electrical charge and hydrophobic/hydrophilic characteristics of the NPs. According to the composition of the biological fluids that have to be crossed during the journey of the drug-loaded NPs towards the target cells, the surface of these particles can be changed by covering their core with various types of polymers or with functionalized polymers carrying some special molecules, that will preferentially adsorb some proteins in their PC. The PC’s composition may change by continuous processes of adsorption and desorption, depending on the affinity of these proteins for the chemical structure of the surface of NPs. Beside these, in designing the targeted drug delivery NPs one can take into account their toxicity, initiation of an immune response, participation (enhancement or inhibition) in certain metabolic pathways or chemical processes like reactive oxygen species, type of endocytosis of target cells, and many others. There are cases in which these processes seem to require antagonistic properties of nanoparticles. Products that show good behavior in cell cultures may lead to poor in vivo results, when the composition of the formed PC is totally different. This paper reviews the physico-chemical properties, cellular uptake and drug delivery applications of chitosan-based nanoparticles, specifying the factors that contribute to the success of the targeted drug delivery. Furthermore, we highlight the role of the protein corona formed around the NP in its intercellular fate. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop