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Special Issue "Pesticide Residues in the Environment and Food Chain: Fate, Bioaccumulation and Toxicology"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Medicinal Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2014).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jesus Simal-Gandara
grade E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry and Food Science, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, University of Vigo, Ourense Campus, E-32004 Ourense, Spain
Interests: phenolic compounds; antioxidants; marine drugs; food safety; bioaccessibility; functional foods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pesticides have numerous beneficial effects. These include crop protection, preservation of food and materials and prevention of vector-borne diseases. Since their mode of action is by targeting systems or enzymes in the pests which may be identical or very similar to systems or enzymes in human beings and other animals, they can pose risks to human health and also the environment. Some pesticides are characterized by being very persistent in the environment. They may represent long-term dangers as they biomagnify up the food-chain. There is growing concern about exposure to pesticides at both high and low levels.

Prof. Dr. Jesus Simal-Gandara
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • pesticides
  • environmental fate
  • accumulation in the food chain
  • toxicology
  • regulatory issues

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Degradation Dynamics of Glyphosate in Different Types of Citrus Orchard Soils in China
Molecules 2015, 20(1), 1161-1175; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules20011161 - 12 Jan 2015
Cited by 40 | Viewed by 4145
Abstract
Glyphosate formulations that are used as a broad-spectrum systemic herbicide have been widely applied in agriculture, causing increasing concerns about residues in soils. In this study, the degradation dynamics of glyphosate in different types of citrus orchard soils in China were evaluated under [...] Read more.
Glyphosate formulations that are used as a broad-spectrum systemic herbicide have been widely applied in agriculture, causing increasing concerns about residues in soils. In this study, the degradation dynamics of glyphosate in different types of citrus orchard soils in China were evaluated under field conditions. Glyphosate soluble powder and aqueous solution were applied at 3000 and 5040 g active ingredient/hm2, respectively, in citrus orchard soils, and periodically drawn soil samples were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that the amount of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in soils was reduced with the increase of time after application of glyphosate formulations. Indeed, the amount of glyphosate in red soil from Hunan and Zhejiang Province, and clay soil from Guangxi Province varied from 0.13 to 0.91 µg/g at 42 days after application of aqueous solution. Furthermore, the amount of glyphosate in medium loam from Zhejiang and Guangdong Province, and brown loam from Guizhou Province varied from less than 0.10 to 0.14 µg/g, while the amount of AMPA varied from less than 0.10 to 0.99 µg/g at 42 days after application of soluble powder. Overall, these findings demonstrated that the degradation dynamics of glyphosate aqueous solution and soluble powder as well as AMPA depend on the physicochemical properties of the applied soils, in particular soil pH, which should be carefully considered in the application of glyphosate herbicide. Full article
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Article
Determination and Occurrence of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides and Their Transformation Products in Groundwater Using Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Molecules 2014, 19(12), 20627-20649; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules191220627 - 10 Dec 2014
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 3585
Abstract
A sensitive method was developed and validated for ten phenoxyacetic acid herbicides, six of their main transformation products (TPs) and two benzonitrile TPs in groundwater. The parent compounds mecoprop, mecoprop-p, 2,4-D, dicamba, MCPA, triclopyr, fluroxypr, bromoxynil, bentazone, and 2,3,6-trichlorobenzoic acid (TBA) are included [...] Read more.
A sensitive method was developed and validated for ten phenoxyacetic acid herbicides, six of their main transformation products (TPs) and two benzonitrile TPs in groundwater. The parent compounds mecoprop, mecoprop-p, 2,4-D, dicamba, MCPA, triclopyr, fluroxypr, bromoxynil, bentazone, and 2,3,6-trichlorobenzoic acid (TBA) are included and a selection of their main TPs: phenoxyacetic acid (PAC), 2,4,5-trichloro-phenol (TCP), 4-chloro-2-methylphenol (4C2MP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP), 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (T2P), and 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (BrAC), as well as the dichlobenil TPs 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) and 3,5-dichlorobenzoic acid (DBA) which have never before been determined in Irish groundwater. Water samples were analysed using an efficient ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method in an 11.9 min separation time prior to detection by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The limit of detection (LOD) of the method ranged between 0.00008 and 0.0047 µg·L−1 for the 18 analytes. All compounds could be detected below the permitted limits of 0.1 µg·L−1 allowed in the European Union (EU) drinking water legislation [1]. The method was validated according to EU protocols laid out in SANCO/10232/2006 with recoveries ranging between 71% and 118% at the spiked concentration level of 0.06 µg·L−1. The method was successfully applied to 42 groundwater samples collected across several locations in Ireland in March 2012 to reveal that the TPs PAC and 4C2MP were detected just as often as their parent active ingredients (a.i.) in groundwater. Full article
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