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Special Issue "Polysaccharide-Based Materials II"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioorganic Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jun-ichi Kadokawa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology, and Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan
Interests: polysaccharides; supramolecules; nanostructures; enzymatic synthesis; ionic liquids
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polysaccharides are widely distributed and exhibit specific functions in nature. They are composed of a wide variety of monosaccharide residues, through glycosidic linkages with highly stereo- and regio-controlled arrangements. Such diverse structures of natural polysaccharides contribute to showing a wide range of properties and natures, which are used as components in functional materials. Although natural polysaccharides often show poor solubilities in common solvents, leading to difficulty in processability, dissolution media, such as ionic liquids, have been found to efficiently dissolve polysaccharides. Synthesis of non-natural polysaccharides has also attracted a great deal of attention in obtaining new polysaccharide-based functional materials. Owing to complicated structures, the chemical synthesis of polysaccharides is one of the most challenging research topics in glycoscience. Efficient synthetic methods with highly stereo- and regio-construction of glycosidic linkages, such as the enzymatic approach, have recently been developed to produce well-defined polysaccharides.

This Special Issue aims at covering all fields concerning polysaccharide-based materials, including the synthetic method, derivatization and modification, biocompatibility and biological functions, supramolecular and hierarchically controlled structures, environmentally benign and biomedical applications, and so on. Researchers in these fields are, therefore, warmly invited to propose relevant reviews, perspectives, and research papers to be published in this Special Issue of Molecules.

Prof. Dr. Jun-ichi Kadokawa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • New synthetic methods
  • Derivatization and modification, functional materials
  • Supramolecules
  • Hierarchically controlled structures
  • Environmentally benign materials
  • Biomedical applications

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Preparation of Amylose-Oligo[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] Inclusion Complex by Vine-Twining Polymerization
Molecules 2021, 26(9), 2595; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/molecules26092595 - 29 Apr 2021
Viewed by 652
Abstract
In this study, we attempted to prepare an amylose-oligo[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (ORHB) inclusion complex using a vine-twining polymerization approach. Our previous studies indicated that glucan phosphorylase (GP)-catalyzed enzymatic polymerization in the presence of appropriate hydrophobic guest polymers produces the corresponding amylose–polymer inclusion complexes, [...] Read more.
In this study, we attempted to prepare an amylose-oligo[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (ORHB) inclusion complex using a vine-twining polymerization approach. Our previous studies indicated that glucan phosphorylase (GP)-catalyzed enzymatic polymerization in the presence of appropriate hydrophobic guest polymers produces the corresponding amylose–polymer inclusion complexes, a process named vine-twining polymerization. When vine-twining polymerization was conducted in the presence of ORHB under general enzymatic polymerization conditions (45 °C), the enzymatically produced amylose did not undergo complexation with ORHB. However, using a maltotriose primer in the same polymerization system at 70 °C for 48 h to obtain water-soluble amylose, called single amylose, followed by cooling the system over 7 h to 45 °C, successfully induced the formation of the inclusion complex. Furthermore, enzymatic polymerization initiated from a longer primer under the same conditions induced the partial formation of the inclusion complex. The structures of the different products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, 1H-NMR, and IR measurements. The mechanism of formation of the inclusion complexes discussed in the study is proposed based on the additional experimental results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polysaccharide-Based Materials II)
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