Special Issue "Stable Perovskite Materials: From Synthesis to Optoelectronic Devices"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Solar Energy and Solar Cells".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sofia Masi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Advanced Materials (INAM), Universitat Jaume I (UJI), Avenida de Vicent Sos Baynat, s/n, 12071 Castellón de la Plana, Spain
Interests: perovskite solar cells; perovskite LEDs; nuclear magnetic spectroscopy; nanomaterials; perovskite quantum dots; PbS quantum dots; hole transport layer; electron transport layer; lead-free perovskite; photocatalysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metal halide perovskites have emerged as a class of semiconductor materials with unique optoelectronic properties that enable a broad range of energy-related applications. Since the first application of metal halide perovskites, their photoconversion efficiencies have been improved to 25%. However, in moving towards commercialization, the scientific community is focusing the efforts on the contemporary challenges associated with the limited operational stability of hybrid perovskites and on the replacement of lead (Pb) with less toxic metals, commonly tin (Sn). This Special Issue of Nanomaterials aims to publish original research papers and review articles focusing on the innovative synthesis and application of stable and/or lead-free perovskite, in the form of methylammonium-free perovskite, nanocomposite perovskite additives, 2D perovskite, and perovskite quantum dots, in order to understand the fundamental degradation mechanisms and address them. Recent advances towards deepening the understanding of the nature of instabilities in hybrid perovskite materials and the corresponding devices from the perspective of structural properties and optoelectronics as well as device operation will be covered.

In this Special Issue, we aim to provide a timely perspective on the advances in perovskite optoelectronics, especially those related to stabilization strategies. Topics to be covered include (but are not limited to):

  • Chemical–structural strategies to stabilize hybrid perovskites;
  • Low-dimensional perovskites for stable devices;
  • Stability of hybrid perovskite devices under real-world operation conditions;
  • Lead-free stable perovskite synthesis and optical properties;
  • Advanced optoelectronic devices (solar cells, LEDs);
  • Photocatalysis.

Experimental and theoretical contributions are both welcome.

Accepted papers are published in the joint Special Issue in Nanomaterials or Nanomanufacturing (https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/journal/nanomanufacturing/special_issues/Nanom_Optoele_Perov).

Dr. Sofia Masi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Stability
  • Metal halide perovskite
  • 2D/ 3D perovskite
  • Perovskite quantum dots
  • Lead-free perovskite
  • Surface chemistry
  • Crystal phase stability
  • Strain in metal halide perovskite
  • Ambient stability
  • Solar cells
  • LEDs
  • Optoelectronics

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Effect of PbSO4-Oleate Coverage on Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Quantum Dots to Control Halide Exchange Kinetics
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(10), 2515; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nano11102515 - 27 Sep 2021
Viewed by 297
Abstract
The selective control of halide ion exchange in metal halide perovskite quantum dots (PQDs) plays an important role in determining their band gap and composition. In this study, CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, and I) PQDs [...] Read more.
The selective control of halide ion exchange in metal halide perovskite quantum dots (PQDs) plays an important role in determining their band gap and composition. In this study, CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, and I) PQDs were self-assembled with PbSO4-oleate to form a peapod-like morphology to selectively control halide ion exchange. Considering the distinct absorption and bright luminescence characteristics of these PQDs, in situ UV-Vis. absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies were employed to monitor the time-dependent band gap and compositional changes of the PQDs. We determined that the halide exchange in the capped PQDs is hindered—unlike the rapid anion exchange in noncapped PQDs—by a reduction in the halide exchange kinetic rate depending on the extent of coverage of the PQDs. Thus, we tracked the halide ion exchange kinetics between CsPbBr3 and CsPbI3 PQDs, depending on the coverage, using in situ UV-Vis. absorption/photoluminescence spectroscopy. We regulated the halide exchange reaction rate by varying the capping reaction temperature of the PQDs. The capping hindered the halide exchange kinetics and increased the activation energy. These results will enable the development of white LEDs, photovoltaic cells, and photocatalysts with alternative structural designs based on the divalent composition of CsPbX3 PQDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stable Perovskite Materials: From Synthesis to Optoelectronic Devices)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
The Contribution of NMR Spectroscopy in Understanding Perovskite Stabilization Phenomena
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(8), 2024; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nano11082024 - 08 Aug 2021
Viewed by 691
Abstract
Although it has been exploited since the late 1900s to study hybrid perovskite materials, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has only recently received extraordinary research attention in this field. This very powerful technique allows the study of the physico-chemical and structural properties of [...] Read more.
Although it has been exploited since the late 1900s to study hybrid perovskite materials, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has only recently received extraordinary research attention in this field. This very powerful technique allows the study of the physico-chemical and structural properties of molecules by observing the quantum mechanical magnetic properties of an atomic nucleus, in solution as well as in solid state. Its versatility makes it a promising technique either for the atomic and molecular characterization of perovskite precursors in colloidal solution or for the study of the geometry and phase transitions of the obtained perovskite crystals, commonly used as a reference material compared with thin films prepared for applications in optoelectronic devices. This review will explore beyond the current focus on the stability of perovskites (3D in bulk and nanocrystals) investigated via NMR spectroscopy, in order to highlight the chemical flexibility of perovskites and the role of interactions for thermodynamic and moisture stabilization. The exceptional potential of the vast NMR tool set in perovskite structural characterization will be discussed, aimed at choosing the most stable material for optoelectronic applications. The concept of a double-sided characterization in solution and in solid state, in which the organic and inorganic structural components provide unique interactions with each other and with the external components (solvents, additives, etc.), for material solutions processed in thin films, denotes a significant contemporary target. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stable Perovskite Materials: From Synthesis to Optoelectronic Devices)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Effect of PbSO4-Oleate Coverage on Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals to Control Anion Exchange
Authors: Yeonsu Woo; Seeun Park; Junsang Cho; Seog Joon Yoon
Affiliation: 1) Department of Chemistry, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 38541, Republic of Korea 2) Department of Chemistry, Duksung Women's University, Seoul, 04763, Republic of Korea
Abstract: Selective control of halide ion exchange in metal halide nanocrystals (NCs) plays an important role in determining the bandgap and composition of nanocrystals. The CsPbX3 (X = Cl-, Br-, and I-) NCs were self-assembled with PbSO4-oleate to form as peapod-like morphology to control halide ion exchange selectively. By utilizing the distinct absorption and bright luminescence characteristics of these NCs, in-situ UV-Vis. absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic tools were utilized to monitor time-dependent band gap and composition changes of the NCs. Unlike non-capped NCs and their rapid anion exchange, we figured out the halide exchange is dependent on morphology of peapod on the NCs. Depending on the morphological change, we tracked the halide ion exchange between two CsPbBr3 and CsPbI3 NCs through the in-situ UV-Vis. absorption/photoluminescence spectroscopies. We were able to regulate the halide exchange reaction rate through time adjustment of peapods self-assembly process, and these adjustments can selectively control the bandgap and composition ratio of nanocrystals. These results can be attributed to white-LEDs, photovoltaic cells, and photocatalysts using the divalent composition of the CsPbX3 NCs for alternative structural designs.

Back to TopTop