Special Issue "Biobased Nanoscale Drug Delivery Systems"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanoparticles or nanocapsules are an attractive tool used in medicine, responsible for several advancements in the diagnosis and treatment of multiple diseases. Between their many applications, their use as drug delivery systems, diagnosis, and the improvement of biocompatible materials properties can be highlighted. Their large functional surface, quantum properties, ability to bind, adsorb, and carry drugs, probes, and proteins are unique features of nanoparticles, which are very important for medical purposes. Even though inorganic systems are the most widely researched, lately, biobased, sustainable solutions have encountered a great demand as they are less harmful not only to the human body but also to the environment. New approaches to deal with the growing concern associated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the urgency for target-directed systems that act on a local bases and prevent systemic side effects have boosted research on biobased systems as platforms for drug delivery. This Special Issue seeks manuscript submissions that further our understanding of the ability of organic nanosystems to target and deliver specialized biomolecules in a sustainable way, without causing harmful responses. Further, studies that deal with the advantages of these systems over conventional strategies or inorganic nanoscale approaches are very welcome. Submissions on new processing and extraction methodologies for biobased materials, including biomolecules and polymers, are also encouraged.

Dr. Helena P. Felgueiras
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanocapsules
  • organic particles
  • biomaterials functionalization
  • biological delivery systems
  • natural-origin polymers
  • organic synthesis
  • target-directed platforms
  • localized drug action
  • antimicrobial agents
  • infection control

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
In Situ Crosslinked Hydrogel Depot for Sustained Antibody Release Improves Immune Checkpoint Blockade Cancer Immunotherapy
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 471; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nano11020471 - 12 Feb 2021
Viewed by 791
Abstract
The therapeutic inhibition of immune checkpoints, including cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein (CTLA)-4 and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), through the use of function blocking antibodies can confer improved clinical outcomes by invigorating CD8+ T cell-mediated anticancer immunity. However, low rates of patient [...] Read more.
The therapeutic inhibition of immune checkpoints, including cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein (CTLA)-4 and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), through the use of function blocking antibodies can confer improved clinical outcomes by invigorating CD8+ T cell-mediated anticancer immunity. However, low rates of patient responses and the high rate of immune-related adverse events remain significant challenges to broadening the benefit of this therapeutic class, termed immune checkpoint blockade (ICB). To overcome these significant limitations, controlled delivery and release strategies offer unique advantages relevant to this therapeutic class, which is typically administered systemically (e.g., intravenously), but more recently, has been shown to be highly efficacious using locoregional routes of administration. As such, in this paper, we describe an in situ crosslinked hydrogel for the sustained release of antibodies blocking CTLA-4 and PD-1 signaling from a locoregional injection proximal to the tumor site. This formulation results in efficient and durable anticancer effects with a reduced systemic toxicity compared to the bolus delivery of free antibody using an equivalent injection route. This formulation and strategy thus represent an approach for achieving the efficient and safe delivery of antibodies for ICB cancer immunotherapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobased Nanoscale Drug Delivery Systems)
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Review

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Review
3D Printing in Development of Nanomedicines
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 420; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nano11020420 - 07 Feb 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1208
Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) printing is gaining numerous advances in manufacturing approaches both at macro- and nanoscales. Three-dimensional printing is being explored for various biomedical applications and fabrication of nanomedicines using additive manufacturing techniques, and shows promising potential in fulfilling the need for patient-centric personalized [...] Read more.
Three-dimensional (3D) printing is gaining numerous advances in manufacturing approaches both at macro- and nanoscales. Three-dimensional printing is being explored for various biomedical applications and fabrication of nanomedicines using additive manufacturing techniques, and shows promising potential in fulfilling the need for patient-centric personalized treatment. Initial reports attributed this to availability of novel natural biomaterials and precisely engineered polymeric materials, which could be fabricated into exclusive 3D printed nanomaterials for various biomedical applications as nanomedicines. Nanomedicine is defined as the application of nanotechnology in designing nanomaterials for different medicinal applications, including diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, prevention, and control of diseases. Nanomedicine is also showing great impact in the design and development of precision medicine. In contrast to the “one-size-fits-all” criterion of the conventional medicine system, personalized or precision medicines consider the differences in various traits, including pharmacokinetics and genetics of different patients, which have shown improved results over conventional treatment. In the last few years, much literature has been published on the application of 3D printing for the fabrication of nanomedicine. This article deals with progress made in the development and design of tailor-made nanomedicine using 3D printing technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobased Nanoscale Drug Delivery Systems)
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