Special Issue "Non-coding RNA: 5th Anniversary"

A special issue of Non-Coding RNA (ISSN 2311-553X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues and Non-coding RNA Aficionados,

It's time to celebrate – the Non-Coding RNA journal is celebrating its 5th anniversary! It is quite an achievement, as the non-coding RNA field is very competitive and the number of journals publishing papers on genes that do not codify for proteins but regulate their roles is increasing each day. This news is good: the journal established its own niche by publishing interesting and well cited papers related to the roles of non-coding RNAs in many organisms and in a plethora of physiologic and disease conditions. Consequently, we are expecting, and curious about, the first impact factor of the journal!

It is time to thank all the members of the Editorial Board who, in spite of their busy schedule, reviewed many papers and contributed scientifically by publishing in the journal. It is also time to thank the authors, as trusting the journal before the impact factor is on the market has risks, but rewards also, if and when the journal keeps growing and establishing an identity, as Non-Coding RNA has done already! And of course, time to thank the editorial staff that kept through dedicated work the journal expanding. And last but not the least, to thank the many passionate readers – without your curiosity and time to read the papers from Non-Coding RNA and without you citing the manuscripts that you enjoyed and trusted, the journal would not exist!

It is also time to prepare a commemorative Special Issue focused on non-coding RNAs. I invite the members of the Editorial Board, the authors of former papers and the readers with passion for ncRNAs to contribute experimental papers or reviews. Any topic that is new and they consider interesting on ncRNAs can be covered! With the editorial staff, I will work on organizing a quick and fair reviewing process to publish the most interesting manuscripts. Science is all about having fun making discoveries and presenting reproducible results that back up creative conclusions!

Thank you all again and keep making discoveries!

Prof. Dr. George A Calin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Non-Coding RNA is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Research

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Article
MicroSalmon: A Comprehensive, Searchable Resource of Predicted MicroRNA Targets and 3’UTR Cis-Regulatory Elements in the Full-Length Sequenced Atlantic Salmon Transcriptome
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(4), 61; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ncrna7040061 (registering DOI) - 22 Sep 2021
Abstract
Complete 3’UTRs unambiguously assigned to specific mRNA isoforms from the Atlantic salmon full-length (FL) transcriptome were collected into a 3’UTRome. miRNA response elements (MREs) and other cis-regulatory motifs were subsequently predicted and assigned to 3’UTRs of all FL-transcripts. The MicroSalmon GitHub repository provides [...] Read more.
Complete 3’UTRs unambiguously assigned to specific mRNA isoforms from the Atlantic salmon full-length (FL) transcriptome were collected into a 3’UTRome. miRNA response elements (MREs) and other cis-regulatory motifs were subsequently predicted and assigned to 3’UTRs of all FL-transcripts. The MicroSalmon GitHub repository provides all results. RNAHybrid and sRNAtoolbox tools predicted the MREs. UTRscan and the Teiresias algorithm predicted other 3’UTR cis-acting motifs, both known vertebrate motifs and putative novel motifs. MicroSalmon provides search programs to retrieve all FL-transcripts targeted by a miRNA (median number 1487), all miRNAs targeting an FL-transcript (median number 27), and other cis-acting motifs. As thousands of FL-transcripts may be targets of each miRNA, additional experimental strategies are necessary to reduce the likely true and relevant targets to a number that may be functionally validated. Low-complexity motifs known to affect mRNA decay in vertebrates were over-represented. Many of these were enriched in the terminal end, while purine- or pyrimidine-rich motifs with unknown functions were enriched immediately downstream of the stop codon. Furthermore, several novel complex motifs were over-represented, indicating conservation and putative function. In conclusion, MicroSalmon is an extensive and useful, searchable resource for study of Atlantic salmon transcript regulation by miRNAs and cis-acting 3’UTR motifs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNA: 5th Anniversary)
Article
A New Specific and Sensitive RT-qPCR Method Based on Splinted 5′ Ligation for the Quantitative Detection of RNA Species Shorter than microRNAs
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(3), 59; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ncrna7030059 - 18 Sep 2021
Viewed by 149
Abstract
Recently, we discovered a new family of unusually short RNAs mapping to 5.8S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and which we named dodecaRNAs (doRNAs), according to the number of core nucleotides (12 nt) their members contain. To confirm these small RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) data, validate the [...] Read more.
Recently, we discovered a new family of unusually short RNAs mapping to 5.8S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and which we named dodecaRNAs (doRNAs), according to the number of core nucleotides (12 nt) their members contain. To confirm these small RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) data, validate the existence of the two overly abundant doRNAs—the minimal core 12-nt doRNA sequence and its + 1-nt variant bearing a 5′ Cytosine, C-doRNA—and streamline their analysis, we developed a new specific and sensitive splinted 5′ ligation reverse transcription (RT)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method. This method is based on a splint-assisted ligation of an adapter to the 5′ end of doRNAs, followed by RT-qPCR amplification and quantitation. Our optimized protocol, which may discriminate between doRNA, C-doRNA, mutated and precursor sequences, can accurately detect as low as 240 copies and is quantitatively linear over a range of 7 logs. This method provides a unique tool to expand and facilitate studies exploring the molecular and cellular biology of RNA species shorter than microRNAs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNA: 5th Anniversary)
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Article
Systematic Identification and Functional Validation of New snoRNAs in Human Muscle Progenitors
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(3), 56; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ncrna7030056 - 13 Sep 2021
Viewed by 267
Abstract
Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) represent an important class of regulatory RNAs involved in the regulation of transcription, RNA splicing or translation. Among these sncRNAs, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) mostly originate from intron splicing in humans and are central to posttranscriptional regulation of gene [...] Read more.
Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) represent an important class of regulatory RNAs involved in the regulation of transcription, RNA splicing or translation. Among these sncRNAs, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) mostly originate from intron splicing in humans and are central to posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. However, the characterization of the complete repertoire of sncRNAs in a given cellular context and the functional annotation of the human transcriptome are far from complete. Here, we report the large-scale identification of sncRNAs in the size range of 50 to 200 nucleotides without a priori on their biogenesis, structure and genomic origin in the context of normal human muscle cells. We provided a complete set of experimental validation of novel candidate snoRNAs by evaluating the prerequisites for their biogenesis and functionality, leading to their validation as genuine snoRNAs. Interestingly, we also found intergenic snoRNAs, which we showed are in fact integrated into candidate introns of unannotated transcripts or degraded by the Nonsense Mediated Decay pathway. Hence, intergenic snoRNAs represent a new type of landmark for the identification of new transcripts that have gone undetected because of low abundance or degradation after the release of the snoRNA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNA: 5th Anniversary)
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Article
17β-Estradiol Regulates miR-9-5p and miR-9-3p Stability and Function in the Aged Female Rat Brain
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(3), 53; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ncrna7030053 - 30 Aug 2021
Viewed by 370
Abstract
Clinical studies demonstrated that the ovarian hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) is neuroprotective within a narrow window of time following menopause, suggesting that there is a biological switch in E2 action that is temporally dependent. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this temporal [...] Read more.
Clinical studies demonstrated that the ovarian hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) is neuroprotective within a narrow window of time following menopause, suggesting that there is a biological switch in E2 action that is temporally dependent. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this temporal switch have not been determined. Our previous studies focused on microRNAs (miRNA) as one potential molecular mediator and showed that E2 differentially regulated a subset of mature miRNAs which was dependent on age and the length of time following E2 deprivation. Notably, E2 significantly increased both strands of the miR-9 duplex (miR-9-5p and miR-9-3p) in the hypothalamus, raising the possibility that E2 could regulate miRNA stability/degradation. We tested this hypothesis using a biochemical approach to measure miRNA decay in a hypothalamic neuronal cell line and in hypothalamic brain tissue from a rat model of surgical menopause. Notably, we found that E2 treatment stabilized both miRNAs in neuronal cells and in the rat hypothalamus. We also used polysome profiling as a proxy for miR-9-5p and miR-9-3p function and found that E2 was able to shift polysome loading of the miRNAs, which repressed the translation of a predicted miR-9-3p target. Moreover, miR-9-5p and miR-9-3p transcripts appeared to occupy different fractions of the polysome profile, indicating differential subcellular. localization. Together, these studies reveal a novel role for E2 in modulating mature miRNA behavior, independent of its effects at regulating the primary and/or precursor form of miRNAs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNA: 5th Anniversary)
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Article
Non-Coding, RNAPII-Dependent Transcription at the Promoters of rRNA Genes Regulates Their Chromatin State in S. cerevisiae
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(3), 41; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ncrna7030041 - 11 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1230
Abstract
Pervasive transcription is widespread in eukaryotes, generating large families of non-coding RNAs. Such pervasive transcription is a key player in the regulatory pathways controlling chromatin state and gene expression. Here, we describe long non-coding RNAs generated from the ribosomal RNA gene promoter called [...] Read more.
Pervasive transcription is widespread in eukaryotes, generating large families of non-coding RNAs. Such pervasive transcription is a key player in the regulatory pathways controlling chromatin state and gene expression. Here, we describe long non-coding RNAs generated from the ribosomal RNA gene promoter called UPStream-initiating transcripts (UPS). In yeast, rDNA genes are organized in tandem repeats in at least two different chromatin states, either transcribed and largely depleted of nucleosomes (open) or assembled in regular arrays of nucleosomes (closed). The production of UPS transcripts by RNA Polymerase II from endogenous rDNA genes was initially documented in mutants defective for rRNA production by RNA polymerase I. We show here that UPS are produced in wild-type cells from closed rDNA genes but are hidden within the enormous production of rRNA. UPS levels are increased when rDNA chromatin states are modified at high temperatures or entering/leaving quiescence. We discuss their role in the regulation of rDNA chromatin states and rRNA production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNA: 5th Anniversary)
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Article
Exosomes in Epilepsy of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Carriers of Pro-Inflammatory MicroRNAs
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(3), 40; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ncrna7030040 - 10 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1226
Abstract
Exosomes are a class of small, secreted extracellular vesicles (EV) that have recently gained considerable attention for their role in normal cellular function, disease processes and potential as biomarkers. Exosomes serve as intercellular messengers and carry molecular cargo that can alter gene expression [...] Read more.
Exosomes are a class of small, secreted extracellular vesicles (EV) that have recently gained considerable attention for their role in normal cellular function, disease processes and potential as biomarkers. Exosomes serve as intercellular messengers and carry molecular cargo that can alter gene expression and the phenotype of recipient cells. Here, we investigated alterations of microRNA cargo in exosomes secreted by epileptogenic tissue in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a multi-system genetic disorder that includes brain lesions known as tubers. Approximately 90% of TSC patients suffer from seizures that originate from tubers, and ~60% are resistant to antiseizure drugs. It is unknown why some tubers cause seizures while others do not, and the molecular basis of drug-resistant epilepsy is not well understood. It is believed that neuroinflammation is involved, and characterization of this mechanism may be key to disrupting the “vicious cycle” between seizures, neuroinflammation, and increased seizure susceptibility. We isolated exosomes from epileptogenic and non-epileptogenic TSC tubers, and we identified differences in their microRNA cargo using small RNA-seq. We identified 12 microRNAs (including miR-142-3p, miR-223-3p and miR-21-5p) that are significantly increased in epileptogenic tubers and contain nucleic acid motifs that activate toll-like receptors (TLR7/8), initiating a neuroinflammatory cascade. Exosomes from epileptogenic tissue caused induction of key pathways in cultured cells, including innate immune signaling (TLR), inflammatory response and key signaling nodes SQSTM1 (p62) and CDKN1A (p21). Genes induced in vitro were also significantly upregulated in epileptogenic tissue. These results provide new evidence on the role of exosomes and non-coding RNA cargo in the neuroinflammatory cascade of epilepsy and may help advance the development of novel biomarkers and therapeutic approaches for the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNA: 5th Anniversary)
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Article
miR-24 Targets the Transmembrane Glycoprotein Neuropilin-1 in Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(1), 9; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ncrna7010009 - 02 Feb 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2248
Abstract
Neuropilin-1 is a transmembrane glycoprotein that has been implicated in several processes including angiogenesis and immunity. Recent evidence has also shown that it is implied in the cellular internalization of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), which causes the coronavirus disease 2019 [...] Read more.
Neuropilin-1 is a transmembrane glycoprotein that has been implicated in several processes including angiogenesis and immunity. Recent evidence has also shown that it is implied in the cellular internalization of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), which causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We hypothesized that specific microRNAs can target Neuropilin-1. By combining bioinformatic and functional approaches, we identified miR-24 as a regulator of Neuropilin-1 transcription. Since Neuropilin-1 has been shown to play a key role in the endothelium-mediated regulation of the blood-brain barrier, we validated miR-24 as a functional modulator of Neuropilin-1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs), which are the most suitable cell line for an in vitro blood–brain barrier model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNA: 5th Anniversary)
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Review

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Review
Functional Role of miR-155 in the Pathogenesis of Diabetes Mellitus and Its Complications
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(3), 39; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ncrna7030039 - 07 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1359
Abstract
Substantial evidence indicates that microRNA-155 (miR-155) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications. A number of clinical studies reported low serum levels of miR-155 in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Preclinical studies revealed that miR-155 [...] Read more.
Substantial evidence indicates that microRNA-155 (miR-155) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications. A number of clinical studies reported low serum levels of miR-155 in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Preclinical studies revealed that miR-155 partakes in the phenotypic switch of cells within the islets of Langerhans under metabolic stress. Moreover, miR-155 was shown to regulate insulin sensitivity in liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle. Dysregulation of miR-155 expression was also shown to predict the development of nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy in DM. Here, we systematically describe the reports investigating the role of miR-155 in DM and its complications. We also discuss the recent results from in vivo and in vitro models of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and T2D, discussing the differences between clinical and preclinical studies and shedding light on the molecular pathways mediated by miR-155 in different tissues affected by DM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNA: 5th Anniversary)
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Review
Long Non-Coding RNAs in the Control of Gametogenesis: Lessons from Fission Yeast
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(2), 34; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ncrna7020034 - 11 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1563
Abstract
Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) contribute to cell fate decisions by modulating genome expression and stability. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the transition from mitosis to meiosis results in a marked remodeling of gene expression profiles, which ultimately ensures gamete production and [...] Read more.
Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) contribute to cell fate decisions by modulating genome expression and stability. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the transition from mitosis to meiosis results in a marked remodeling of gene expression profiles, which ultimately ensures gamete production and inheritance of genetic information to the offspring. This key developmental process involves a set of dedicated lncRNAs that shape cell cycle-dependent transcriptomes through a variety of mechanisms, including epigenetic modifications and the modulation of transcription, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulations, and that contribute to meiosis-specific chromosomal events. In this review, we summarize the biology of these lncRNAs, from their identification to mechanism of action, and discuss their regulatory role in the control of gametogenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNA: 5th Anniversary)
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Review
Elucidating the Functions of Non-Coding RNAs from the Perspective of RNA Modifications
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(2), 31; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ncrna7020031 - 11 May 2021
Viewed by 2027
Abstract
It is now commonly accepted that most of the mammalian genome is transcribed as RNA, yet less than 2% of such RNA encode for proteins. A majority of transcribed RNA exists as non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) with various functions. Because of the lack of [...] Read more.
It is now commonly accepted that most of the mammalian genome is transcribed as RNA, yet less than 2% of such RNA encode for proteins. A majority of transcribed RNA exists as non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) with various functions. Because of the lack of sequence homologies among most ncRNAs species, it is difficult to infer the potential functions of ncRNAs by examining sequence patterns, such as catalytic domains, as in the case of proteins. Added to the existing complexity of predicting the functions of the ever-growing number of ncRNAs, increasing evidence suggests that various enzymes modify ncRNAs (e.g., ADARs, METTL3, and METTL14), which has opened up a new field of study called epitranscriptomics. Here, we examine the current status of ncRNA research from the perspective of epitranscriptomics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNA: 5th Anniversary)
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Review
Emerging Data on the Diversity of Molecular Mechanisms Involving C/D snoRNAs
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(2), 30; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ncrna7020030 - 06 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1927
Abstract
Box C/D small nucleolar RNAs (C/D snoRNAs) represent an ancient family of small non-coding RNAs that are classically viewed as housekeeping guides for the 2′-O-methylation of ribosomal RNA in Archaea and Eukaryotes. However, an extensive set of studies now argues that they are [...] Read more.
Box C/D small nucleolar RNAs (C/D snoRNAs) represent an ancient family of small non-coding RNAs that are classically viewed as housekeeping guides for the 2′-O-methylation of ribosomal RNA in Archaea and Eukaryotes. However, an extensive set of studies now argues that they are involved in mechanisms that go well beyond this function. Here, we present these pieces of evidence in light of the current comprehension of the molecular mechanisms that control C/D snoRNA expression and function. From this inventory emerges that an accurate description of these activities at a molecular level is required to let the snoRNA field enter in a second age of maturity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNA: 5th Anniversary)
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Review
Non-Coding RNAs in Retinoic Acid as Differentiation and Disease Drivers
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(1), 13; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ncrna7010013 - 17 Feb 2021
Viewed by 1699
Abstract
All-trans retinoic acid (RA) is the most active metabolite of vitamin A. Several studies have described a pivotal role for RA signalling in different biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation, embryonic development and organogenesis. Since RA signalling is highly dose-dependent, a [...] Read more.
All-trans retinoic acid (RA) is the most active metabolite of vitamin A. Several studies have described a pivotal role for RA signalling in different biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation, embryonic development and organogenesis. Since RA signalling is highly dose-dependent, a fine-tuning regulatory mechanism is required. Thus, RA signalling deregulation has a major impact, both in development and disease, related in many cases to oncogenic processes. In this review, we focus on the impact of ncRNA post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, especially those of microRNAs and lncRNAs, in RA signalling pathways during differentiation and disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNA: 5th Anniversary)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: To be determined
Authors: Martin Pichler
Affiliation: Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 15, Austria

Title: Biogenesis and regulation of gene expression by miRNAs: all about structure
Authors: Francisco J. Enguita
Affiliation: Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Professor Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisbon, Portugal

Title: To be determined
Authors: Patrick Provost
Affiliation: Université Laval, CHUQ Research Center/CHUL, 2705 Blvd Laurier, Room T1-65, Quebec, QC G1V 4G2, Canada

Title: To be determined
Authors: Ramiro Garzon
Affiliation: Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine and Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

Title: To be determined
Authors: Ioana Berindan Neagoe
Affiliation: Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Romania

Title: isomiR contribution to melanoma pathogenesis
Authors: Elisabetta Broseghini, Giorgio Durante, (others) and Manuela Ferracin
Affiliation: Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine (DIMES), University of Bologna, Italy.

Title: Long non-coding RNAs regulation of epigenetics in vascular cells
Authors: Hester Garratt 1, Robert Ashburn 1, Miron Šopić 2, Antonella Nogara 1, Andrea Caporali 1 and, Tijana Mitić 1.
Affiliation: 1Centre for Cardiovascular Science, The Queen's Medical Research Institute, Edinburgh BioQuarter, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4TJ
2 University of Belgrade - Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medical Biochemistry, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia 

Title: The rising functions of C/D snoRNAs: mind the molecular step
Authors: Stéphane Labialle
Affiliation: Université de Lorrainedisabled, Nancy, France

Title: Metadata analysis: microRNAs in medulloblastoma.
Authors: Gianpiero Di Leva
Affiliation: Keele University, Guy Hilton Research Facility, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG

Title: miR-124 in medullbolastoma
Authors: Gianpiero Di Leva
Affiliation: Keele University, Guy Hilton Research Facility, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG

Title: review/metadata analysis on miR-128 in glioblastoma
Authors: Agnieszka Bronisz
Affiliation: Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Harvard University

Title: non coding RNAs in retinoic acid signalling.
Authors: Diego Franco Jaime
Affiliation: Universidad de Jaén

Title: long non-coding RNAs involved in the control of gametogenesis in fission yeast
Authors: Mathieu Rougemaille
Affiliation: CNRS investigator, Group Leader Institute for Integrative Biology of the Cell Université Paris-Saclay, CEA, CNRS 91190 Gif-sur-Yvette France

Title: Non-coding, RNAPII-dependent transcription at the promoters of rRNA genes regulates their chromatin state in yeast S. cerevisiae
Authors: Emma Lesage1#, Jorge Perez-Fernandez 1,2#, Christophe Dez1, Olivier Gadal1* and Marta Kwapisz1*
Affiliation: 1 Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire Eucaryote, Centre de Biologie Intégrative (CBI), Université de Toulouse, CNRS, UPS, France.

Title: Imaging Intron Evolution
Authors: Maria Antonietta Panaro
Affiliation: Department of Biosciences, Biotechnologies and Biopharmaceutics, University of Bari, Bari, Italy

Title: noncoding RNAs in neuro-degenerative diseases
Authors: Babu V. Sajesh
Affiliation: Research Institute in Oncology and Hematology, Cancer Care Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 0V9, Canada

Title: MicroRNA-204 impairs vasculogenic mimicry by targeting CREB5 transcription factor in breast cancer cells
Authors: Cesar Lopez-Camarillo
Affiliation: Universidad Autonoma de la Ciudad de Mexico. CDMX, Mexico.

Title: The diverse mechanisms of lncRNAs in virus-related cancers
Authors: Lei Shi
Affiliation: Transcriptional Networks in Lung Cancer Group, Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute, The University of Manchester, Alderley Park SK10 4TG, UK

Title: Elucidating the functions of non-coding RNAs from the perspective of RNA modifications
Authors: Venkata Naga Srikanth Garikipati 1,2 and Shizuka Uchida 3,*
Affiliation: 1 Department of Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, 43210 USA.; [email protected] 2 Dorothy M. Davis Heart Lung and Research Institute, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Co-lumbus, OH, 43210 USA; .; [email protected] 3 Center for RNA Medicine, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Frederikskaj 10B, 2. (building C), DK-2450 Copenhagen SV, Denmark; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Exosomes in epilepsy of tuberous sclerosis complex: carriers of pro-inflammatory microRNAs
Authors: Alan A. Dombkowski1*, Daniela Cukovic1, Shruti Bagla1, Dylan Ukasik1, Eishi Asano1,2, Aimee Luat2,3, and Diane C. Chugani
Affiliation: 1Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA 2Children’s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI 48201, USA 3Central Michigan University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA

Title: miRNA host genes - regulation, biogenesis, and functional duality
Authors: Erik Knutsen
Affiliation: Institutt for Medisinsk Biologi, Det Helsevitenskapelige Fakultet, UiT Norges Arktiske Universitet 9037 Tromsø, Noway

Title: Comprehensive databases for predicted microRNA targets and 3’UTR cis-regulatory elements in the Atlantic salmon transcriptome
Authors: Sigmund Ramberg and Rune Andreassen
Affiliation: Oslo metropolitan University (Oslomet), Oslo, Norway

Title: discovery and functions of M. tuberculosis encoded small RNAs
Authors: Nicolai S.C. van Oers
Affiliation: Department of Immunology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, NA2.200, 6000 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, USA

Title: Binding of the RNA chaperone Hfq on target mRNAs promotes the small RNA RyhB-induced degradation in Escherichia coli
Authors: David Lalaouna1,4†, Karine Prévost1,†, Seongjin Park2, Thierry Chénard1, Marie-Pier Bouchard1, Marie-Pier Caron1, Carin K. Vanderpool3, Jingyi Fei2,*, and Eric Massé1,*,γ
Affiliation: 1. Université de Sherbrooke, CRCHUS, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Biochemistry and Functional Genomics, RNA Group, 3201 Jean Mignault Street, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada, J1E 4K8 2. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, 929 E. 57 St., Chicago, USA, IL 60637 3. Department of Microbiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 601 S Goodwin Ave., Urbana, USA, IL 61801

Title: Estradiol differentially regulates miR-9-5p and miR-9-3p depending on age in a rat model of menopause
Authors: Chun K. Kim, Megan Linscott, Sarah Flury, Mengjie Zhang, and Toni R. Pak
Affiliation: Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine

Title: LncRNA signature in Leishmania-infected macrophage
Authors: Sandra M Muxel
Affiliation: University of São Paulo

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