Special Issue "Nursing and COVID-19"

A special issue of Nursing Reports (ISSN 2039-4403).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Richard Gray
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
Interests: mental health services; psychosocial interventions; co-morbidity; workforce
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sonia Udod
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Nursing, University of Manitoba Winnipeg, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada
Interests: nurse manager development; nurse leader role in transitions of care; nurses' work environments; health care quality; qualitative research approaches; healthcare leadership
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nurses have been a frontline workforce in managing the COVID-19 pandemic, and there are many important reflections and observations that need to be discussed and shared by clinicians and researchers. This Nursing Reports Special Issue on “Nursing and COVID-19” will provide a platform to highlight the issues and challenges faced by nurses practicing in hospital and community settings during the pandemic by bringing together experts to present evidence-based discussions on the impact, experience, and reality of providing evidence-based nursing care during the crisis. We are particularly interested in papers that examine the psychosocial impact of COVID-19 on nurses, showcase novel and innovative ways of delivering patient care (e.g., telehealth), and consider the organizational and management challenges of providing a safe and effective nursing service. This timely dialogue is highly relevant, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to profoundly impact the way in which we live and work.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public.

Prof. Dr. Richard Gray
Dr. Sonia Udod
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nursing Reports is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • nursing
  • pandemic
  • public health
  • workforce

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Published Papers (10 papers)

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Research

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Article
Stress and Coping Strategies among Nursing Students in Clinical Practice during COVID-19
Nurs. Rep. 2021, 11(3), 629-639; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nursrep11030060 - 11 Aug 2021
Viewed by 818
Abstract
Stress is common among nursing students and it has been exacerbated during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examined nursing students’ stress levels and their coping strategies in clinical practice before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. A repeated-measures study design was used to examine [...] Read more.
Stress is common among nursing students and it has been exacerbated during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examined nursing students’ stress levels and their coping strategies in clinical practice before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. A repeated-measures study design was used to examine the relationship between nursing students’ stress levels and coping strategies before and during the pandemic. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to validate the survey and a student T-test was used to compare the level of stress and coping strategies among 131 nursing students. The STROBE checklist was used. During COVID-19, there was a reliable and accurate relationship between stress and coping strategies. Furthermore, both stress and coping strategy scores were lower before COVID-19 and higher during COVID-19. Nursing students are struggling to achieve a healthy stress-coping strategy during the pandemic. There is a need for the introduction of stress management programs to help foster healthy coping skills. Students are important resources for our health system and society and will continue to be vital long term. It is now up to both nursing educators and health administrators to identify and implement the needed improvements in training and safety measures because they are essential for the health of the patient as well as future pandemics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
Article
Healthcare Management and Quality during the First COVID-19 Wave in a Sample of Spanish Healthcare Professionals
Nurs. Rep. 2021, 11(3), 536-546; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nursrep11030051 - 13 Jul 2021
Viewed by 638
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess how the healthcare professionals in the Castellón Province (Spain) perceive healthcare quality and management during the first COVID-19 wave. A cross-sectional study was carried out. An online survey on healthcare quality and management during the [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to assess how the healthcare professionals in the Castellón Province (Spain) perceive healthcare quality and management during the first COVID-19 wave. A cross-sectional study was carried out. An online survey on healthcare quality and management during the first COVID-19 wave was sent to healthcare professionals. Almost half of the sample believed that healthcare quality worsened during the first COVID-19 wave (45.3%; n = 173). Heavier workload (m = 4.08 ± 1.011) and patients’ complexity (m = 3.77 ± 1.086) were the factors that most negatively impacted healthcare quality. Health department 3, primary care center, and other doctors assessed human and material resources management as significantly worse (p < 0.05). Human and material resources management and the healthcare organization negatively affected healthcare quality during the first COVID-19 wave. Significant differences were observed according to departments, services, and professionals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
Article
Novice Nurses’ Experiences Caring for Acutely Ill Patients during a Pandemic
Nurs. Rep. 2021, 11(2), 382-394; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nursrep11020037 - 27 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1685
Abstract
The Coronavirus pandemic erupted in 2020 and new graduate registered nurses (RNs) found themselves caring for those with devastating illness as they were transitioning into nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of novice nurses working in acute [...] Read more.
The Coronavirus pandemic erupted in 2020 and new graduate registered nurses (RNs) found themselves caring for those with devastating illness as they were transitioning into nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of novice nurses working in acute care settings during a pandemic. This qualitative phenomenological study of novice nurses working in facilities providing acute care for COVID-19 patients was conducted in Phoenix, Arizona, USA. Purposive sampling identified 13 participants for interviews. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Eight themes emerged: Dealing with death, Which personal protective equipment (PPE) will keep us safe?, Caring for high acuity patients with limited training, Difficulties working short-staffed, Everything is not okay, Support from the healthcare team, Nursing school preparation for a pandemic, I would still choose nursing. Novice nurses felt challenged by the experience and were at times overwhelmed and struggling to cope. Support from peers and coping skills learned during nursing school helped them continue to work during a critical time. Data from this study suggest that some participants may have been experiencing symptoms of anxiety, depression, or post-traumatic stress disorder, and findings provide foundational insights for nursing education and psychological interventions to support the nursing workforce. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
Article
Healthcare Provider Attitudes toward the Newly Developed COVID-19 Vaccine: Cross-Sectional Study
Nurs. Rep. 2021, 11(1), 187-194; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nursrep11010018 - 23 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1100
Abstract
Background: During the long wait and the global anxiety for a vaccine against COVID-19, impressively high-safety and effective vaccines were invented by multiple pharmaceutical companies. Aim: We aimed to assess the attitudes of healthcare providers and evaluate their intention to advocate for the [...] Read more.
Background: During the long wait and the global anxiety for a vaccine against COVID-19, impressively high-safety and effective vaccines were invented by multiple pharmaceutical companies. Aim: We aimed to assess the attitudes of healthcare providers and evaluate their intention to advocate for the vaccine. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary private hospital where an electronic survey was distributed among healthcare providers (HCPs). The survey contained two sections: socio-demographic characteristics and Likert-scale perception, with 72% internal consistency. Results: The response rate to the email survey was 37% (n = 236). In addition, 169 (71.6%) of respondents were women, with more than half (134, 56.8%) aged ≤35 years. A total of 110 (46.6%) had over 10 years of experience, and most of them were nurses (146, 62%). Univariate analysis revealed that older participants significantly accepted and advocated for the new vaccine more than the younger ones. In the multivariate analysis, men were significantly more likely than women to accept and advocate for the new vaccine, as were those with chronic illnesses. Participants with allergy were significantly less likely to accept the vaccine than others. odds ratio (OR) and p-values were 2.5, 0.003; 2.3, 0.04; and 0.4, 0.01, respectively. Conclusion: The acceptance rate for the newly-developed COVID-19 vaccines was average among HCPs. Sex, age, presence of chronic illnesses, and allergy were significant predictors of accepting the vaccine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
Article
Impacts of Coping Mechanisms on Nursing Students’ Mental Health during COVID-19 Lockdown: A Cross-Sectional Survey
Nurs. Rep. 2021, 11(1), 36-44; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nursrep11010004 - 12 Jan 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3454
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic and consequent lockdown have precipitated significant disruption in the educational system. Nursing students are known to have higher levels of stress and anxiety than other non-nursing students, but there is a dearth of evidence regarding the impacts of the COVID-19 [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic and consequent lockdown have precipitated significant disruption in the educational system. Nursing students are known to have higher levels of stress and anxiety than other non-nursing students, but there is a dearth of evidence regarding the impacts of the COVID-19 lockdown on their mental health and coping mechanisms. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the influence of coping mechanisms as predictors of stress, anxiety, and depression among nursing students during the COVID-19 lockdown. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted from 20 April to 10 May 2020 among 173 nursing students at a private university in Southern California, USA. Results: Self-reported stress, anxiety, and depression were significantly higher during the lockdown compared to the pre-lockdown period (p < 0.001). Almost a quarter of participants reported high stress, while more than half reported moderate-to-severe symptoms of anxiety and depression. High resilience was negatively associated with high stress (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.46; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.22–0.98; p = 0.045), moderate-to-severe anxiety (OR = 0.47; 95%CI = 0.25–0.90; p = 0.022), and moderate-to-severe depression (OR = 0.50; 95%CI = 0.26–0.95; p = 0.036). Similarly, high family functioning was negatively associated with high stress (OR = 0.41; 95%CI = 0.20–0.86; p = 0.018), moderate-to-severe anxiety (OR = 0.41; 95%CI = 0.21–0.80; p = 0.009), and moderate-to-severe depression (OR = 0.41; 95%CI = 0.20–0.81; p = 0.011). High spiritual support was negatively associated with moderate-to-severe depression (OR = 0.48; 95%CI = 0.24–0.95; p = 0.035). Conclusions: During the COVID-19 lockdown, nursing students experienced remarkable levels of poor mental health. High levels of resilience and family functioning were associated with 2- to 2.4-fold lower risk of stress, anxiety, and depression, whereas high spiritual support was associated with 2-fold lower risk of depression. As the pandemic evolves, fostering these coping mechanisms may help students to maintain their psychological wellbeing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
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Article
Blessings and Curses: Exploring the Experiences of New Mothers during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Nurs. Rep. 2020, 10(2), 207-219; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nursrep10020023 - 21 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1957
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore the postpartum experiences of new parents during the COVID-19 pandemic. The postpartum period can be a time of significant transition, both positive and negative, for parents as they navigate new relationships with their babies and [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to explore the postpartum experiences of new parents during the COVID-19 pandemic. The postpartum period can be a time of significant transition, both positive and negative, for parents as they navigate new relationships with their babies and shifts in family dynamics. Physical distancing requirements mandated by public health orders during the COVID-19 pandemic had the potential to create even more stress for parents with a newborn. Examining personal experiences would provide health care professionals with information to help guide support during significant isolation. Feminist poststructuralism guided the qualitative research process. Sixty-eight new mothers completed an open-ended on-line survey. Responses were analyzed using discourse analysis to examine the beliefs, values, and practices of the participants relating to their family experiences during the pandemic period. It was found that pandemic isolation was a time of complexity with both ‘blessings and curses’. Participants reported that it was a time for family bonding and enjoyment of being a new parent without the usual expectations. It was also a time of missed opportunities as they were not able to share milestones and memories with extended family. Caring for a newborn during the COVID-19 pandemic where complex contradictions were constructed by competing social discourses created difficult dichotomies for families. In acknowledging the complex experiences of mothers during COVID-19 isolation, nurses and midwives can come to understand and help new parents to focus on the blessings of this time while acknowledging the curses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
Article
Development and Validation of a Questionnaire to Measure Knowledge of and Attitude toward COVID-19 among Nursing Students in Greece
Nurs. Rep. 2020, 10(2), 82-94; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nursrep10020012 - 16 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1604
Abstract
Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic, nursing students have had a key role in supporting the healthcare sector. They can join healthcare professionals in clinical practice or provide information to increase citizens’ levels of knowledge and their compliance with the restriction measures. The study [...] Read more.
Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic, nursing students have had a key role in supporting the healthcare sector. They can join healthcare professionals in clinical practice or provide information to increase citizens’ levels of knowledge and their compliance with the restriction measures. The study aimed to develop and validate a tool to measure knowledge of and attitudes toward COVID-19 among nursing students in Greece. Methods: A questionnaire was developed through theoretical research and expert consultation. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 348 undergraduate nursing students of the Department of Nursing, Hellenic Mediterranean University, recruited by convenient sampling. Validity and reliability were analyzed. Results: The Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin measure was 0.84, indicating that the sample size was adequate for factor analysis. In addition, the p-value for Bartlett’s test of sphericity was <0.001, denoting that the correlation matrix was suitable for factor analysis. The construct validity of the questionnaire was determined through exploratory factor analysis (EFA), which revealed that 16 items lead to four factors: knowledge, attitude toward restriction measures, compliance with them, and volunteering. One of the key findings of this study was that participants preferred to receive information from valid sources rather than social media during the crucial period of the “infodemic”. Conclusions: The questionnaire was shown to have satisfying psychometric properties and, therefore, can be used as a tool in future research in the area of nursing students’ knowledge, attitudes, compliance, and volunteering during the COVID-19 pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)

Review

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Review
Stressors and Coping Strategies among Nursing Students during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Scoping Review
Nurs. Rep. 2021, 11(2), 444-459; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nursrep11020042 - 03 Jun 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1983
Abstract
COVID-19 has impacted every aspect of life around the world. Nursing education has moved classes online. Undoubtedly, the period has been stressful for nursing students. The scoping review aimed to explore the relevant evidence related to stressors and coping strategies among nursing students [...] Read more.
COVID-19 has impacted every aspect of life around the world. Nursing education has moved classes online. Undoubtedly, the period has been stressful for nursing students. The scoping review aimed to explore the relevant evidence related to stressors and coping strategies among nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. The scoping review methodology was used to map the relevant evidence and synthesize the findings by framing the research question using PICOT, determining the keywords, eligibility criteria, searching the CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PubMed databases for the relevant studies. The review further involved study selection based on the PRISMA flow diagram, charting the data, collecting, and summarizing the findings. The critical analysis of findings from the 13 journal articles showed that the COVID-19 period has been stressful for nursing students with classes moving online. The nursing students feared the COVID-19 virus along with experiencing anxiety and stressful situations due to distance learning, clinical training, assignments, and educational workloads. Nursing students applied coping strategies of seeking information and consultation, staying optimistic, and transference. The pandemic affected the psychological health of learners as they adjusted to the new learning structure. Future studies should deliberate on mental issues and solutions facing nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
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Review
Nursing Surge Capacity Strategies for Management of Critically Ill Adults with COVID-19
Nurs. Rep. 2020, 10(1), 23-32; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nursrep10010004 - 08 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1877
Abstract
Background: There is a vital need to develop strategies to improve nursing surge capacity for caring of patients with coronavirus (COVID-19) in critical care settings. COVID-19 has spread rapidly, affecting thousands of patients and hundreds of territories. Hospitals, through anticipation and planning, can [...] Read more.
Background: There is a vital need to develop strategies to improve nursing surge capacity for caring of patients with coronavirus (COVID-19) in critical care settings. COVID-19 has spread rapidly, affecting thousands of patients and hundreds of territories. Hospitals, through anticipation and planning, can serve patients and staff by developing strategies to cope with the complications that a surge of COVID-19 places on the provision of adequate intensive care unit (ICU) nursing staff—both in numbers and in training. Aims: The aim is to provide an evidence-based starting point from which to build expanding staffing models dealing with these additional demands. Design/Method: In order to address and develop nursing surge capacity strategies, a five-member expert panel was formed. Multiple questions directed towards nursing surge capacity strategies were posed by the assembled expert panel. Literature review was conducted through accessing various databases including MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central, and EMBASE. All studies were appraised by at least two reviewers independently using the Joanna Briggs Institute JBI Critical Appraisal Tools. Results: The expert panel has issued strategies and recommendation statements. These proposals, supported by evidence-based resources in regard to nursing staff augmentation strategies, have had prior success when implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusion: The proposed guidelines are intended to provide a basis for the provision of best practice nursing care during times of diminished intensive care unit (ICU) nursing staff capacity and resources due to a surge in critically ill patients. The recommendations and strategies issued are intended to specifically support critical care nurses incorporating COVID-19 patients. As new knowledge evidence becomes available, updates can be issued and strategies, guidelines and/or policies revised. Relevance to Clinical Practice: Through discussion and condensing research, healthcare professionals can create a starting point from which to synergistically develop strategies to combat crises that a pandemic like COVID-19 produces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
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Other

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Commentary
Nurses and Doctors Heroes? A Risky Myth of the COVID19 Era
Nurs. Rep. 2020, 10(2), 37-40; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nursrep10020006 - 28 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1173
Abstract
Recent newspapers reports have named health professionals as “heroes”. This is surprising, because in the last few decades, doctors and nurses have been taken into account by mass media only to describe cases of misconduct or of violence. This change was due to [...] Read more.
Recent newspapers reports have named health professionals as “heroes”. This is surprising, because in the last few decades, doctors and nurses have been taken into account by mass media only to describe cases of misconduct or of violence. This change was due to the coronavirus pandemic scenario that has produced fear in the population and the need for an alleged “savior”. This need for health professionals seen as heroes is also disclosed by the fact that even politicians have abdicated to their role in favor of the healthcare “experts” to whom important decisions on social life during this pandemic have been delegated, even those decisions that fall outside of the specific health field. This commentary is a claim to framing the job of caregivers in its correct role, neither angel nor devil, but allied to the suffering person, that the image of “heroes” risks to overshadow. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
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